"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-19-2008, 02:29 PM   #11
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 50
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
Nope. Chicken breast, flour, mushrooms, chicken stock, marsala wine (can be purchased at any liquor stor and is cheap)

There's a bazillion recipes, all you need is a side. Maybe some sauteed asparagus or rosemary roasted new potatoes.
It's a fairly easy recipe and very tasty.
Well then I'll definetly have to try it too :D

Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Roast Chicken.

Perfect Roast Chicken

A properly roasted chicken is so easy to prepare, and always SO delicious * brown, crispy skin and juicy, succulent meat. And it makes the house smell SO good!

makes 4 to 6 servings, depending upon what you serve with it

1 free-range roasting chicken (5 to 6 pounds)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt & freshly ground pepper to taste
2 whole heads plump fresh garlic, unpeeled, cut in half horizontally
several sprigs of fresh rosemary
several sprigs of fresh thyme
several sprigs of fresh marjoram
several sprigs of fresh lavender greens (if you can find a plant)
1 cup cold water or white wine (to baste the chicken)

1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Start by rinsing the chicken inside and out with cold running water. Drain it well and dry inside and out with paper towels. Make a mixture of about
2 teaspoons freshly ground pepper and 1 tablespoon of coarse sea salt in a small bowl. Place the bowl alongside a shallow 9 x 14-inch roasting pan. Put the olive oil in the pan and distribute evenly. You will also need a 3-foot length of kitchen string.

2. Put the chicken into the pan and turn to coat well with the olive oil.
Season it generously, inside and out with salt and pepper. Put about half of the herbs inside the cavity. Truss with string.

3. Place the chicken on its side in the pan. Put the halved garlic heads (cut side up) and the remainder of the herbs into the pan alongside the chicken. Place the pan on a rack in the center of the oven and roast, uncovered, for 20 minutes. Baste the chicken with the water and roast for another 25 minutes. Baste again * this time with the juices in the pan— turn the chicken to the other side, and repeat the process. This will take a total of 90 minutes roasting time. By this time the skin should be a deep golden color. Test to see if the juices run clear when you pierce a thigh with the point of a knife.

4. Remove the pan from the oven and transfer the chicken to a platter on which you have placed an overturned salad plate. Place the chicken at an angle against the edge of the plate with its tail in the air. (This retains moisture because the juices flow down through the breast meat.) Cover the chicken loosely with foil. Let it rest for at least 10 minutes or up to 30 minutes. The chicken will continue to cook as it rests. Reserve the roasted garlic to serve with the chicken.

5. To prepare a sauce, remove the herbs from the pan and skim as much fat as possible from the pan juices. Place the roasting pan over medium heat and scrape up any brown bits that cling to the bottom. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, scraping and stirring until the liquid is almost caramelized. Do not let it burn. Spoon off and discard any excess fat. Add several tablespoons cold water to deglaze (hot water would cloud the sauce), and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer until thickened, about 5 minutes.

6. While the sauce is cooking, carve the chicken and arrange it on a warmed serving platter along with the garlic.

7. Strain the sauce through a fine-mesh sieve and pour into a sauceboat. Serve immediately with the chicken and the halved heads of garlic.
hmmmm, how would this compare to the roast chickens you get from the supermarkets? We often buy roast chickens so I am wondering if it'll be worth it...

If I make it I also want a recipe to go with it, like a special way of making the mash potatoes or even better a good way of making the vegetables.... to go with it

Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
An easy one that doesn’t require a lot of ingredients would be Salmon Croquettes – Also known as Salmon Patties.

Take a can of Salmon and drain the liquid off. Put the Salmon in a bowl. In another bowl beat an egg – Like for scrambled eggs – Stir it in the Salmon – Next add about 2 or 3 tablespoons of finely minced onion, a little garlic powder, Salt, and black pepper etc. to taste Lastly, add in some flour, bread crumbs or my favorite finely crushed Saltine crackers or a combination of all three – Add just enough of this “binder” so you can form small patties without them falling apart --- Form the patties, and fry in just a little oil until brown --- turn and brown the other side. Remove and drain on paper towels….

Serve with Ketchup, Cabbage Slaw, and French fries….

If you use crackers as one of the binders, remember they have salt on them...so easy on the added salt. Also if you need to “stretch” the Salmon – add a can of drained Tuna!

Have Fun and Enjoy!
Definetly gonna make that, sounds simple....

I Think I'll go with this recipe too...

How To Make Butter Chicken Recipe (Food & Drink: Indian Cuisine)

Thanks for all the input definetly keep it coming, I'll get to make the stuff if not this week then the next....

Alx26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2008, 02:36 PM   #12
Master Chef
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
hmmmm, how would this compare to the roast chickens you get from the supermarkets? We often buy roast chickens so I am wondering if it'll be worth it...
Excuse me? Try making the Perfect Roast Chicken and purchase a supermarket rotisserie chicken too. Try them side by side.

If the roast chicken isn't better, then it's either YOUR cooking, or the quality of the chicken.

Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2008, 02:51 PM   #13
Sous Chef
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Philly PA
Posts: 702
I will second CJ for a long time I was intimidated by the whole chicken.. actually by anything but pre-cut chicken strips at first.... Once I made one I was totally converted. I am always trying new ways..stuffing, poaching different seasonings etc. It will taste more fresh and probably be more healthful han the market chicken... you will save a buck or two as well
PanchoHambre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2008, 03:37 PM   #14
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 50
hehe thats settled then

Whole chicken sunday dinner.

Salmon patties.

chicken thigh stew

butter chicken and chicken masala

BOOM got myself a fun weekend. THANKS A LOT GUYS!


I don't think my supermarket will sell these herbs fresh. where is a good place to get them, in the UK? How will fresh compare to dry herbs?

several sprigs of fresh rosemary
several sprigs of fresh thyme
several sprigs of fresh marjoram
several sprigs of fresh lavender greens
Alx26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2008, 04:58 PM   #15
Head Chef
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Boston area
Posts: 2,488
Perhaps for another time, I second Jeekins' suggestion of Chicken Marsala.

It's WAY easy but the flavor is somewhat rich and sophisticated, as if you put a lot more work into it than you did.

(I serve mine with egg noodles, Jeeks and maybe a side of steamed broccoli flowerets).

QSis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2008, 11:46 AM   #16
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 50
The roasted chicken was.....

Perfect, as the name suggests. Absolutely perfect

The salmon patties were also quite good.

not got to anything else yet

Alx26 is offline   Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities

Copyright 2002-2015 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:52 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.