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Old 01-19-2008, 10:46 AM   #1
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Grated apple pancakes fell apart

I followed a recipe that called for grated apple to go into my pancakes. I grated the apple and mixed it into the mixture just like it said, but it was impossible to turn them over with them falling to pieces. Advice?

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Old 01-19-2008, 12:59 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seans_potato_business View Post
I followed a recipe that called for grated apple to go into my pancakes. I grated the apple and mixed it into the mixture just like it said, but it was impossible to turn them over with them falling to pieces. Advice?
Did you wait until bubbles appeared on the top and the pc appeared golden and shrinking back a little around the edges?

Other possibilities:

Your grater produced too much juice and you included that with the apple and it created an over abundance of liquid in your mix.

You followed the pancake recipe, but added way too much apple. Did the recipe say Xcup or just an apple? An apple can yield much different amounts depending on the size and method of grating.

You missed something in the pancake mix recipe.
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Old 01-19-2008, 01:14 PM   #3
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If you followed the recipe exactly, and your technique was sound (see above post for when to turn over), then add an extra egg to the batter. This will add more body to the pancake. You might also substitue apple sauce for the grated apple, or diced aple. But remember, the ratio of flour batter top apple is important. Too much apple will make the pancake heavy, and won't give enough flour and egg to hold things together. Another great technique is to sprinkle the apple onto the pancake after the batter has been spooned onto the griddle. That way, you know you have enough batter for the amount of apple used.

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Old 01-19-2008, 04:23 PM   #4
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First, all published recipes are not reliable. Those from friends are less so.

The obvious culprit is water from the apples.

The first thing I learned to cook was pancakes, and as a kid would have other kids over for them. Why they let me and my sister access to the stove at the tender ages we were I have no idea, but we were very responsible. My sister and I were old, even as kids.

Anyway, my guess it is the liquid from the apples. Grate them thicker and squeeze the fluid out.

You are going to have to play with this a bit, at least that is my guess. But heck, it is only pancakes, not foie gras. Tossing a couple away is not a tragedy.

Just my take on things.
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Old 01-20-2008, 11:23 PM   #5
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Just a thought why not use some real apple cider in the mix say 1/4 cider to 3/4 milk
for apple flavored pancake. Just a thought
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Old 01-20-2008, 11:39 PM   #6
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I am often leary of recipes that tack on 'variations' at the end that just call for adding additional ingredients without adjusting the recipe. Rather, if I like a suggest I will instead search for a specific recipe for it, and tend to get better results that way.
I think I agree with those above, too much water and/or not enough flour/eggs to hold it all together.
With pancakes I often prefer to substitute one liquid with a fruit juice and then leave the actual fruit as topping once the pancake is cooked and served up.
Just MHO.
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Old 01-21-2008, 12:23 AM   #7
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I think that if you just chop your apple very small it will be okay. They cook very quickly. Place your chopped apple in a small bowl and add your apple spices (same as apple pie spices) and some vanilla. Toss to coat the apple and then add some chopped nuts (optional). Add sugar to the apple mixture. In another medium/large bowl mix together your flour & other dry ingredients. Add your slightly beaten egg(s) to the apples and stir to mix. Add 1/2 of the liquid to your dry ingredients and the apples and stir only until it is moistened. Add some of the other half of the liquid until you have a thick gooey batter. It will probably be about as thick as brownie mix. Only use veggie oil even if it calls for melted margarine or butter (because they cook to quickly and oil does not).

Preheat your skillet on low. You can spray with a nonstick spray or drizzel some oil in the bottom of the skillet. Ladle about 1/2 cup scoop of the pancake batter into the center of the skillet and place a lid to cover for a few minutes. (the steam will keep it moist). You should use a long spatual that will extend to at least the middle to turn it over. After turning no lid and just allow it to brown a little on the bottom. (you can always check the middle for doneness just as you would a cake (if the toothpick comes out clean, it's done)

You can serve with syrup & butter or just sprinkle with powdered sugar. (you can always add a little cinnamon in the powdered sugar) Well, yes, we eat these a lot. I also like banana pancakes and pumpkin.
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Old 01-21-2008, 01:22 AM   #8
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I think if you allowed us to see the recipe we might be able to stop guessing and tell you for sure why your pancakes fell apart.
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Old 01-21-2008, 03:52 AM   #9
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It is rather a sensitive process making those so they dont fall appart.
Here are my tips.
Use plenty of oil and make sure it is very hot before putting the pancake in it.
Make sure the pancakes are cooked very well before attempting to turn them over.
Use a wide instrument to turn them over.
Dont make them more than 4 inches wide.
Cook one at a time.

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Old 01-21-2008, 06:39 AM   #10
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I think if you allowed us to see the recipe we might be able to stop guessing and tell you for sure why your pancakes fell apart.
I don't know where I found it and don't seem to be able to find it again. I wonder if there's also a problem because in the UK we cook our pancakes much thinner than in the US. I don't know if it's appropriate to call them 'crepes', but they're not dissimilar.
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