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Old 01-14-2009, 11:14 AM   #11
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all great info, thanks.

So I am not to add ANY water at all, even in the beginning????
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Old 01-14-2009, 11:18 AM   #12
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So I am not to add ANY water at all, even in the beginning????
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Old 01-14-2009, 11:19 AM   #13
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I have been known to cut off the tail, or at least the fat from the tail, and put that in the bottom of the pan. However, to really increase the amount of drippings, the bird needs to be allowed to "drip". If you roast while the bird is horizontal, a lot of the liquids are trapped in the body cavity. I will take my carving fork, or a large, heavy-duty spoon, insert it up into the body cavity, and actually lift the bird up and tilt it so that the juices run out into the roasting pan. BE CAREFUL NOT TO SPLASH YOURSELF!

The fat from the bird will add some flavor to the gravy. However, is "everything else" that gets caramelized and adds the bulk of the flavor. That can be, but is not limited to, seasonings that drip off the bird, pieces of the meat and/or skin stuck to the roasting pan, blood that coagulates and then caramelizes, etc. I find that it's the caramelize, coagulated blood from the bird that really helps build the fond.

I usually don't use a roux to tighten my gravy. I just cook all the drippings after I remove the bird from the pan until they are well caramelized. I deglaze with rich stock, stirring and scraping to get every last bit dissolved into the liquid. Once that happens, I strain the liquid into a gravy separater, then pour off the liquid into a saucepan while keeping the fat in the separater. I tighten my gravy with cornstarch, then season to taste with salt and pepper.
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Old 01-14-2009, 11:30 AM   #14
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tHANK YOU!
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Old 01-14-2009, 11:35 AM   #15
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Looks like you will have some good gravy Luvs. I got in too late for input, everything I would have said has been said.
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Old 01-15-2009, 06:30 AM   #16
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Concerning water, I think that pretty much sums it up right there!!

I put mine on a rack and add some chicken broth to the pan with some white wine should I have some. I like a thicker creamier gravy so I add in some milk to it when it comes time to make the gravy.
I also layer the bottom of the pan with celery, onions, and carrots along with herbs and pepper. I don't add any salt as I find most chicken stock already has too much in it!
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Old 01-15-2009, 08:10 AM   #17
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Thank you everyone for all that wonderful advice. I will be sure to try a lot of these ideas next time. Sorry for sounding "dumb" but for some reason, I just don't get a whole lot of drippings when I do my chicken/turkeys. It probably totals about 4 or 5 tablespoons which won't make a whole lot of gravy! LOL.
Thanks again.
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Old 01-15-2009, 09:05 AM   #18
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You can also use Wondra, doesn't clump or give off a flour taste but thickens great.
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Old 01-15-2009, 09:22 AM   #19
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For dripping gravy.... unless you make a Roux.. don't use flour..
Uncooked flour adds nothing but a pasty taste...

No one is suggesting flour in gravy should go uncooked. As with any starch, after adding it, the gravy should be cooked for several minutes.

Cornstarch gives a different result from flour. When leftover gravy that has been thickened with cornstarch is reheated, it will lose some of its thickening power.
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Old 01-15-2009, 11:35 AM   #20
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I may not have read this carefully enough to see if anyone else suggested this, but if I am lacking in drippings, I always add some butter to the pan. To me, if it doesn't start out with a roux, it just doesn't taste like gravy to me, so I would never add flour & water to the pan. I'll add butter, scrape all the crusty bits off the bottom as it melts, add flour and let it cook a bit as I stir it and get out all the lumps. Then, add stock or broth, never water. Everyone does it differently...just a matter of what you are used to and the taste you are looking for.
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