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Old 07-24-2009, 10:25 PM   #11
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If you have Zea's Restaurant in your area you have to try their grits - YUMMY! They are cooked with heavy cream, lots of butter and whole kernel corn - TDF!

I like to cook mine with chicken broth instead of water and add either milk or heavy cream and tons of butter. I agree - never ever instant. I use Aunt Jemima Old Fashioned Grits and pig out when DH cooks pork chops with red-eye gravy and grits - YUM Yum!
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Old 07-24-2009, 11:20 PM   #12
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Puppy Breath (cute name and I LOVE puppy breath!) - - - ok, back to grits. When I make shrimp and grits I use andouille sausage. I poke holes in my andouille and heat it in water. The water gains flavor from the andouille and THAT"S the water I use to cook my grits. We believe in recycling!

UB - Sunday morning may just be cat head day and I may even splurge and make red eye gravy. I'll try to stay away from the country ham...it's just too much sodium for me and I feel it all day long! I'll just take the red eye gravy...no sodium there
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Old 07-25-2009, 08:48 AM   #13
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Puppy Breath (cute name and I LOVE puppy breath!) - - - ok, back to grits. When I make shrimp and grits I use andouille sausage. I poke holes in my andouille and heat it in water. The water gains flavor from the andouille and THAT"S the water I use to cook my grits. We believe in recycling!
WOW - just thinking about that makes my mouth water - love me some andouille
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Old 07-25-2009, 09:29 AM   #14
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Beans and red-eye gravy on a ham slice or bed of rice, grits on the side - it takes me back to my childhood! Ummmmm! Thank you!
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Old 07-25-2009, 10:01 AM   #15
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Old 07-28-2009, 12:41 PM   #16
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Thanks LT, I've found true grits at Tom's Food Market the other night and I love them, They tasted better then corn meal mush "which I thought was grits"

D'uh, Anyways I have a question? How do I make them creamy and not el dente?


I hate "HATE" el dente and I want creamy. Anyways I had some el dente grits this morning for breakfast with salsa and it was very good considering it was el dente!
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Old 07-28-2009, 12:50 PM   #17
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By "true grits" I'm assuming Stone Ground ---- For creamy you'll need 30-45 minutes of cooking time. Simmer, stir, add small amounts of liquid if needed...

Enjoy!
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Old 07-28-2009, 12:52 PM   #18
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That's what the package said stone ground, And thank you very much Uncle Bob!
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Old 07-28-2009, 01:46 PM   #19
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Thanks LT, I've found true grits at Tom's Food Market the other night and I love them, They tasted better then corn meal mush "which I thought was grits"

D'uh, Anyways I have a question? How do I make them creamy and not el dente?

I hate "HATE" el dente and I want creamy...
Corn meal mush is made from just corn meal, and after boiled with a little salt, is left to set and get creamy while in the refrigerator for 8-12 hours. You can boil corn meal until it gets thick and spoon it into a hot, greased skillet right away, but you'll get a different texture. Those are called Johnny cakes, a name made popular during the American Civil War, but the recipe goes back to about the time of the pilgrims. (The native American indians boiled corn meal, but they had no iron to cook on and used no grease in making them unless they added small bits of meat. They baked them directly in the fire and made indian cornbread. - really good even with a few ashes thrown in!)

Grits is corn or maize that has been soaked in lye before coarsely grinding, more coarsely than corn meal. It can be cooked to a creamy texture, but it just takes time and continuous diligence.
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Old 07-28-2009, 01:58 PM   #20
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Corn meal mush is made from just corn meal, and after boiled with a little salt, is left to set and get creamy while in the refrigerator for 8-12 hours. You can boil corn meal until it gets thick and spoon it into a hot, greased skillet right away, but you'll get a different texture. Those are called Johnny cakes, a name made popular during the American Civil War, but the recipe goes back to about the time of the pilgrims. (The native American indians boiled corn meal, but they had no iron to cook on and used no grease in making them unless they added small bits of meat. They baked them directly in the fire and made indian cornbread. - really good even with a few ashes thrown in!)

Grits is corn or maize that has been soaked in lye before coarsely grinding, more coarsely than corn meal. It can be cooked to a creamy texture, but it just takes time and continuous diligence.
Arky, Thanks for the history lesson on Johny Cakes, How tasty are they and what can I garnish them with?
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