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Old 03-27-2012, 08:54 PM   #121
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Finally, here is the picture of walmart ground beef on the left and butcher ground beef on the right. Pink slime, who knows.
ewwwww
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Old 03-27-2012, 09:51 PM   #122
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Finally, here is the picture of walmart ground beef on the left and butcher ground beef on the right. Pink slime, who knows.

The stuff on the left could have been slimed. Clearly the stuff on the right is quite lean. Fatty beef is naturally a lighter color than lean beef and could have been made lighter with slime.
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:08 PM   #123
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Finally, here is the picture of walmart ground beef on the left and butcher ground beef on the right. Pink slime, who knows.
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
The stuff on the left could have been slimed. Clearly the stuff on the right is quite lean. Fatty beef is naturally a lighter color than lean beef and could have been made lighter with slime.
Blissful nor you nor I have any way to tell if Walmart slimed their beef. Nor the butcher either. The one on the left is lighter, on the right as darker and more red, but who can tell if their GB got slimed? They don't even have to list it in ingredients because pink slime is technically the same as beef. It is beef!

It's yucky beef...
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:26 PM   #124
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Blissful nor you nor I have any way to tell if Walmart slimed their beef. Nor the butcher either. The one on the left is lighter, on the right as darker and more red, but who can tell if their GB got slimed? They don't even have to list it in ingredients because pink slime is technically the same as beef. It is beef!

It's yucky beef...
I quite agree. When I cooked the Walmart burger, I added no fat, when I cooked the butcher ground beef I HAD to add fat.........in either case, I have no idea if pink slime was added.
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:53 PM   #125
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As far as I can perceive "pink slime" has little or nothing to do with how much fat the GB has. Depending on the fat concentration of the slime it might either increase or reduce the fat content of the GB.

As far as my long time but little depth cooking experience tells me, hamburgers probably taste better with higher fat content GB. I think the public's first perception of any hamburger has more to do with fat content than anything else. The second perception probably has more to do with the accoutrements than the hamburger patty.

Whether or not your hamburger got slimed probably has little to do with how it tastes, or even IMO how good or bad it is for your health. I think it has a lot more to do with your comprehension of exactly what you are eating. If you don't know about pink slime you'll either accept or reject the hamburger based upon the taste. If you know it got slimed then you probably will be inclined to reject it.

I think that's silly about the "slime" being treated with a bit of ammonia gas. I think this issue is all about the public not liking the idea that beef waste products are being recycled into their hamburger meat.

Whatever the heck happened to the dog food market? I thought all this stuff went into dog food. Maybe they've been introducing vegetables into our dog's diet so that they an sell the meat at better profit elsewhere. Maybe they want us all to have vegetarian dogs so that they can slime our hamburgers and get more money...
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Old 03-28-2012, 12:27 AM   #126
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I think the public is turned off by the term "slime". It certainly doesn't sound very appetizing. And then add to that 'left over bits and pieces' doesn't help the image any. But the final blow is the word "ammonia." That is a cleaning agent and poison at that. We don't hear the word 'gas.'

I doubt the public will ever accept it. The plants that produces the pink slime has shut down its processing plants (there are three of them) in the hopes that they can open again within the next 60 days. Their employees will receive a full salary during those 60 days.

If they took these pieces of meat and made giant vats of gravy to sell to the pet food industry, they could still operate and keep their employees working for a paycheck. That would be the sensible thing to do. Silly dreamer that I am. Large supermarkets use the trimmings from their different cuts for ground beef. The fat goes into one bucket and the pieces of meat into another And the bones into another bucket. At the end of the day, a certain percentage of the fat is added to the pieces of beef and sold as ground beef. If it says ground chuck, it is ground chuck. The same for ground sirloin. The rest of the fat and bones along with the beef is sold to a company that sells slop to pig farms. Farmers mix it with ground grain. The company grinds up the bones, fat and beef and package it in buckets. Nothing goes to waste.

(Son #1's godfather was a meatcutter supervisor for many years for Stop and Shop. He used to tell me some hair raising stories about what went on in the cutting room.)

Oddly enough, in the wild, pigs eat plant material, not meat.
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Old 03-28-2012, 12:43 AM   #127
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Oddly enough, in the wild, pigs eat plant material, not meat.
Oddly enough, in the commercial environment, pigs not only get fed meat but probably get fed pig meat too. Which means that the public is being fed cannibal pigs.
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Old 03-28-2012, 08:44 AM   #128
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I think the public is turned off by the term "slime". It certainly doesn't sound very appetizing. And then add to that 'left over bits and pieces' doesn't help the image any. But the final blow is the word "ammonia." That is a cleaning agent and poison at that. We don't hear the word 'gas.'

I doubt the public will ever accept it. The plants that produces the pink slime has shut down its processing plants (there are three of them) in the hopes that they can open again within the next 60 days. Their employees will receive a full salary during those 60 days.
And oddly the term "slime" wasn't used by Beef Productions Inc to describe their product. People are unhappy that more of the animal is being used and prices are lower. What most people want is only the choicest bits to be used and prices to be lower, it doesn't work that way.

The 60 day thing is likely the Federal WARN act kicking in.
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Old 03-28-2012, 05:23 PM   #129
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I think they call it LFTB, "lean finely textured beef."
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Old 03-28-2012, 07:15 PM   #130
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I think they call it LFTB, "lean finely textured beef."
Which doesn't sound anywhere near as negative (and sounds like it might be made of something out of a cow) as pink slime, which sounds like it was just concocted on a Nickelodeon set.

It is all about the spin I suppose.
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