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Old 04-03-2012, 02:25 PM   #161
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I first learned about "pink slime" several years ago from the documentary "Food Inc" (which is very entertaining and informative, and if you haven't seen it, you should). I was pretty shocked and disgusted, and I'm surprised it didn't cause public outrage sooner. Seriously, you should go out and get that movie.
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Old 04-03-2012, 02:31 PM   #162
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I would bet that "pink slime" is most commonly added to pre-formed frozen patties. I don't think you could handle slimed burger if it wasn't frozen. It would probably be way too thin.
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Old 04-03-2012, 02:36 PM   #163
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I first learned about "pink slime" several years ago from the documentary "Food Inc" (which is very entertaining and informative, and if you haven't seen it, you should). I was pretty shocked and disgusted, and I'm surprised it didn't cause public outrage sooner. Seriously, you should go out and get that movie.
Is this video the same as what you are talking about?
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Old 04-03-2012, 02:54 PM   #164
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We have to make compromises. I do ask my food not kill me when I eat it, which means it isn't hiding little things in it like E Coli and Salmonella. If the only way to get to that is gas it then that is what needs doing.
All the more reason to look for small farm meat sources. The prevalence of dangerous e. coli strains is a problem created by the modern beef industry. The presence of harmful e. coli colonies in traditional grass fed animals is very low. Animals raised in feed lots and fed grain diets harbor more than 300 times as many e. coli in their intestines as pastured cattle.

The waste products from these animals also spread the bacteria through ground water run-off or being used as fertilizer. This is the reason you see e. coli, a gut bacteria, show up in spinach and other vegetable sources.

If your food were raised properly, it wouldn't require gassing at all.
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Old 04-03-2012, 02:58 PM   #165
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At what point is it too much? They grind up beef. Everyone is already suspisious of ground beef to start with. Are they also supposed to say may contain ____ and list every single muscle that may have gone in? What if this week there was no chuck added?

Do they also list things like silicon grease may be found? Someone breathed around the meat and they may have chewed a minty piece of gum after a smoke.

In the end I just don't see this as a huge evil conspiracy. They are selling ground beef. They aren't using the cows eyeballs.
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Old 04-03-2012, 03:02 PM   #166
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They aren't using the cows eyeballs.
It's beef. Are you sure, when should we start caring?
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Old 04-03-2012, 03:04 PM   #167
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It's beef. Are you sure, when should we start caring?
Eyeballs aren't meat. They aren't the "less desirable pieces" used in LFTB.
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Old 04-03-2012, 03:10 PM   #168
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I think I would rather have eyeballs.

E. coli in the food generally means that there is poop in the food. How many of us want "safe poop" in our food.
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Old 04-03-2012, 03:13 PM   #169
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Eyeballs aren't meat. They aren't the "less desirable pieces" used in LFTB.
*I* believe they are meat, beef meat, ground meat, call it anything you want, it's still 'ground beef'.
I haven't seen a source that will say 'ground beef' is anything besides ground pieces of beef, including everything you'd use for dog food, cattle food, baloney, and sausage (and haggis).
If the beef industry can't be honest about the kinds of things they use in ground beef, then, they can't be honest, to make a buck.
And I as a consumer have a right to know what I'm buying.
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Old 04-03-2012, 03:25 PM   #170
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In that case never by anything ground. You just don't know. Seriously.. how do you KNOW the ground beef you are buying is actually from a cow? Because the label says so?
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