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Old 06-19-2006, 11:55 AM   #11
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I love the smell. I have some patches in the yard where I killed the grass last year. Maybe I should fill them with chives
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Old 06-19-2006, 12:34 PM   #12
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GB, your mint may get a bit 'leggy' in the shade; just pinch/cut it back, and it will get bushier.

Chives usually propagate by seeding after they make those pretty little flowers, so wherever you have them planted they're going to sprout up!
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Old 06-19-2006, 12:38 PM   #13
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Thanks Marm
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Old 06-19-2006, 02:21 PM   #14
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Your mint should do well in the shade, although it won't grow as densely as it would with partial sun. You should also stick to basic varieties like spearmint & peppermint rather than the various specialty cultivars. Those seem to really prefer more sun.

As far as chives go - no, they're not even one iota as bad as mint so long as you keep up with weeding your herb garden. They don't spread by underground runners, but rather by prodigious self-seeding. If you diligently keep the seed heads clipped before they mature, you shouldn't have any problems whatsoever apart from dividing the clumps every few years. However, if you let them go to seed, then you will have many seedlings coming up.

This situation is true for many, many varieties of herbs - not just chives. Herbs do require a certain amount of attention if you don't want them overrunning their spaces.
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Old 06-19-2006, 03:18 PM   #15
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I grow mint in the shade, but our summers get so hot and humid that lots of things just parch in the sun. My mil used to grow mint in her backyard at the faucet so when she finished her gardening she would take off her garden shoes and splash her feet in the water and mint. It was very refreshing. She had boocoos of it, though.
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Old 06-19-2006, 03:22 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by licia
My mil used to grow mint in her backyard at the faucet so when she finished her gardening she would take off her garden shoes and splash her feet in the water and mint. It was very refreshing.
What a great idea!!!
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Old 06-19-2006, 05:29 PM   #17
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If you have a copy of the old Joy of Cooking (the old one before the New Joy came out) I know there is a very good section in there about herb gardens, which ones need to be contained, and growing conditions - soil type, amount of sunlight, water, etc.
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Old 06-19-2006, 07:44 PM   #18
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When I was a child in NYC my aunt had a mint patch in a narrow driveway between two houses. The stuff got very little sun, but thrived.

Have had a patch in the hottest of Florida suns, it did fine. Used to make mint juleps with it on Kentucky Derby day.

When we moved here, VA, half our limited garden space was taken over by the stuff.

We now have a small patch, and that is going to be removed.

The stuff is a weed as far as we can tell, and seems to grow in almost any climate.

Will it grow in the shade? Yep, and almost anywhere else.

Breezy is right, as usual. Mint sends out runners, like, oh raspberries, and they will pop up anywhere.

Chives, and many other herbs, will just seed themselves.

And so they are not perennials, but act that way.
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Old 06-19-2006, 08:23 PM   #19
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Okay, so how do you folks use fresh spearmint?

I have a hardy container of spearmint, which I use for mint sauce for lamb, and for mint juleps, and for a few other things.

I would like some new recipes for this.

I do have an easy one that I've filed, but haven't tried yet. Have any of you?

Lee

Chocolate Covered Mint Leaves

This is a nice little trick for an after dinner treat or to decorate a cake. You will need 6 oz of semi-sweet chocolate morsels and freshly picked mint leaves which have been washed and patted dry. Melt the chocolate bits in the top of a double boiler. Dip each leaf in the chocolate and place on waxed paper to harden. Hardening occurs best by placing in the refrigerator.
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Old 06-19-2006, 08:41 PM   #20
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Hey, GB, did you copy that from me? I have my whiskey barrel (by the pool) filled with mint this year, which I planted last year. It is morning sun only. It grows like mad (as it did at Grandma's house) but I keep it confined to the barrel. As soon as I seen any in the ground I get it out FAST! I also trim it or pinch it as marmalady said.

Your mom taught me the chocolate leaf trick that Lee mentioned! It is wonderful. We did it a little differently tho; melted the chocolate in the micro, and painted it on the leaves, then placed in the freezer. If they weren't mint leaves (the first time, we used a lemon-something bush), we peeled the leaf off before using the chocolate to decorate a fruit platter.

I have spearmint, peppermint, orange mint and... um, one other I think, in my barrel. You are welcome to as much as you want this weekend!
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