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Old 01-24-2012, 11:37 PM   #21
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unless your hubby is gordon ramsay on a bender, i wouldn't worry about the integrity of the dish. it's chili, for pete's sake. not exactly a precision recipe.

besides the good tips offered so far, you can take a tip from thailand/malaysia when it comes to dealing with heat and experiment with adding peanut butter or ground peanuts to the chili.

peanut butter/peanuts help tame the heat from chilis in many thai dishes, and it'll add another level of flavour to your chili that you might like. ground peanuts would also add texture.
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Old 01-25-2012, 12:16 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soma View Post
I always serve sour cream, AND yogurt, AND milk with hot foods....

I'm wondering if adding some tiny diced potatoes would help?...( or have helped...I know it's too late now, but for next time...)

or are potatoes simply to reduce an over-salted dish? I've tried that a few times, then removed the potatoes (not diced, too time-consuming to remove diced).

Potatoes don't work for salt or heat or sweet or anything. It's a kitchen myth, disproven by reputable food scientists.

U Bob's suggestion is really the best way
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Old 01-25-2012, 12:22 AM   #23
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I don't think there's any way to fix too hot or too salty by any other means than to cook the same recipe again but without the salt or heat, then mix the two. And then you'd have half as hot or half as salty.

Too bad it's not like too tart where you'd add sugar. But it's not.

I'd advise the OP to serve it with beer, and learn to like too hot. Or toss it and try again next time, with less heat.

I think the recipe mistake involves using the wrong chili pepper and/or spice, as it appears in reading the many replies. Wrong pepper, too hot.

Too bad I'm not the victim. I hardly ever get anything too hot. Most of the time I want hotter. I suppose the OP could get a new DH but maybe that's too drastic a "solution."
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Old 01-25-2012, 07:16 AM   #24
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My first time making chili with chipotles in adobo sauce I made it WAY too hot. Matter of face I won first place in the hottest category in a chili cookoff. What I did with the leftovers was add beans. That wasn't enough so I served it over more beans. I didn't have all the ingredients to make a second batch so I used what I had on hand. I was still the only one in the house that could eat it though. Word to the wise though, that heat will sneak up on you!
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Old 01-25-2012, 07:43 AM   #25
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Like trying to get pee out of a swimming pool! Next to impossible. Chili is supposed to be spicy. I say serve with a glass of milk & enjoy the ride! A little sour cream never hurt either.
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Old 01-26-2012, 04:42 PM   #26
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Refrigerate the Chilli. Make something else for dinner, double the recipe, tomorrow, and make a new batch of chili, add that batch to the refrigerated chilli. Mix and freeze into 3 portions. Thaw and severe when desired. When ever you use a Caspian, always do a search on the HU (heat units) scale of the desired Caspian. Mistakes are nothing more than experience.
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:56 PM   #27
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The best solution when your chili is too hot is to invite me over, and please have plenty of beer available so I can quench the heat!

Seriously, the only two choices when you added too much hot pepper is to either throw it out or make additional batches without the chili and then mix with the original batch.

In reading this topic it appears to me that the OP inadvertently used the wrong kind of chili pepper. I'm pretty sure that everybody who cooks with chili peppers will agree that there is a HUGE range from the mildest to the hottest chili peppers and ground chili powders, and you have to know what your using to make the heat come out how you like. Always err to the mild side and you can provide crushed chili peppers or hot chili sauce for those who want it hotter.
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Old 01-26-2012, 07:04 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allthingsspice View Post
Refrigerate the Chilli. Make something else for dinner, double the recipe, tomorrow, and make a new batch of chili, add that batch to the refrigerated chilli. Mix and freeze into 3 portions. Thaw and severe when desired. When ever you use a Caspian, always do a search on the HU (heat units) scale of the desired Caspian. Mistakes are nothing more than experience.
Good advice, but when you do your search type in capsaicin or you might end up in a far away sea! :-)
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Old 01-26-2012, 09:54 PM   #29
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You are correct their is a difference between caspicums and the Caspian sea
" damn spell check"............. However the Caspian sea does have to offer, a lot of
salt, much like the heat of caspicums ....... Can be very Over powering! Much like the origional problem.
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Old 01-26-2012, 10:02 PM   #30
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...However the Caspian sea does have to offer, a lot of salt,...
True, but if you cut up a raw potato and add it to the Caspian Sea, it will draw some of the salt out making the Caspian Seas taste less salty.

If that doesn't work, get yourself another sea without the salt and combine the two.
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