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Old 02-15-2012, 10:51 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
200F will not crisp the skin, especially not for 5 minutes. That will be a nice tropical spot for them after the fridge, but that is about it. You need high heat to finish.

It is easier to use a wicked sharp knife and have the breasts cold, just out of the fridge when you do your scoring. You will notice the difference from when you start and when you are done as the breasts warm up.
I noticed one of the videos showed the oven's being set to 200 but that was centigrade, not F.
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Old 02-15-2012, 10:57 AM   #12
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Oh 200C would be a lot close.. though it might not be quite enough at 392F

I would think 425-450F would be the ticket.
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Old 02-15-2012, 11:01 AM   #13
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Quote:
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200F will not crisp the skin, especially not for 5 minutes. That will be a nice tropical spot for them after the fridge, but that is about it. You need high heat to finish.
i didnt think finishing in the oven at 200 degrees is to get them crispy...i though that was just to raise the internal temperature? my assumption was the pan rendering and searing should have the skin crispy before the oven? maybe this is my issue????
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It is easier to use a wicked sharp knife and have the breasts cold, just out of the fridge when you do your scoring. You will notice the difference from when you start and when you are done as the breasts warm up.
i am using a freshly sharpened 10" henckles twin cermax. i think im butchering them well.... diamond pattern, score goes all the way through the fat - but not into the flesh. i will upload photos from tonites attempt
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Old 02-15-2012, 11:03 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
Oh 200C would be a lot close.. though it might not be quite enough at 392F

I would think 425-450F would be the ticket.
thanks, i will try 425
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Old 02-15-2012, 11:30 AM   #15
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1. I can't answer that, JJ. I don't use electric, and have no feel for it. With my gas stove I just eyeball it, and adjust based on what the breasts are doing. The fat should be slowly melting out of them.

2. I never use non-stick, won't even have one in the house. Either stainless, carbon steel, or cast iron works. Since rediscovering carbon steel a couple of years ago, it's become my go-to skillet material.

3. No need for a grill press. You are melting the fat, no squeezing it out.

How much fat? Very little. You are rendering the fat, not frying the breasts. Plus, the longer it stays in the pan, the more likely it will burn---rendering it useless for other purposes.

200F will not crisp the skin,.....

+1 to what Frank says, on all points.
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Old 02-15-2012, 12:27 PM   #16
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Any pan will do the trick. The pan surface material doesn't really make a difference in a situation like this. I use SS for a duck breast. CI, Teflon or CS would also do the job. Use what you have.

My gas stove temp knob ranges from 0-10. I use a setting of about 6. You may use a lower setting. The key is that fat is rendering and the skin is browning slowly.
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Old 02-15-2012, 12:42 PM   #17
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I agree with the others: hotter oven. And I think maybe more time than 5 minutes. Get your oven hotter and run the experiment, possibly sacrificing a duck breast just to get the process right. Just leave it in and check the skin crispness from time to time, note how many minutes it took to get crisp, and then see if the breast meat is okay or overcooked. You could do this some time when you have something else planned for dinner so that you're not committed to eat your experiment in case it turns out wrong.
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Old 02-15-2012, 12:46 PM   #18
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Unless you turn it into a hockey puck I am not sure you can go wrong with duck breast.
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Old 02-15-2012, 01:13 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
1. I can't answer that, JJ. I don't use electric, and have no feel for it. With my gas stove I just eyeball it, and adjust based on what the breasts are doing. The fat should be slowly melting out of them.
thanks.... anyone else maybe shed some light on this particular aspect?
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2. I never use non-stick, won't even have one in the house. Either stainless, carbon steel, or cast iron works. Since rediscovering carbon steel a couple of years ago, it's become my go-to skillet material.
again, thanks... now would you put the duck in a hot pan, or put the duck in and then bring the heat up? ive read recipies using both methods
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How much fat? Very little. You are rendering the fat, not frying the breasts. Plus, the longer it stays in the pan, the more likely it will burn---rendering it useless for other purposes.
so as soon as there is a bit of a puddle, pour it out? also, when doing this, i assume its important to make sure the breast doesnt move while draining fat?
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Old 02-15-2012, 01:14 PM   #20
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I agree with the others: hotter oven. And I think maybe more time than 5 minutes. Get your oven hotter and run the experiment, possibly sacrificing a duck breast just to get the process right. Just leave it in and check the skin crispness from time to time, note how many minutes it took to get crisp, and then see if the breast meat is okay or overcooked. You could do this some time when you have something else planned for dinner so that you're not committed to eat your experiment in case it turns out wrong.
i certainly am fine sacraficing a breast or three in the name of perfecting the method.

in the oven, skins side up or down?
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