"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-25-2010, 03:30 PM   #11
Flour Child
 
mollyanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by philso View Post
...invert the cup over the saucer or bowl, and jiggle.
...i know how to jiggle
__________________

__________________


. My kitchen is for dancing. Bring me sunshine in a cup~emily dickinson. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
mollyanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 03:34 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
Mimizkitchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,607
Quote:
Originally Posted by mollyanne View Post
...i know how to jiggle
(me too )
__________________

__________________
A woman is like a tea bag, you never no how strong she is until you put her in hot water...
Mimizkitchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 04:15 PM   #13
Flour Child
 
mollyanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,406
...i meant like a little Irish Jig here, a little Shimmy there...yeah, that's what i meant...uh huh...yeah
__________________


. My kitchen is for dancing. Bring me sunshine in a cup~emily dickinson. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
mollyanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 04:20 PM   #14
Flour Child
 
mollyanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ged View Post
My wife and I are making flan for the first time. We are also making caramel for the first time. Using the recipe in ATK Family Baking Book, we are having trouble with the caramel. It doesn't brown like it's supposed to. We try to use the correct heat for the specified times, but the color never really turns. It also doesn't seem to thicken like it should. We went ahead and added the rest of the ingredients, but it obviously hasn't turned out like it should, so we don't feel like we can proceed.

What to do?
Here we are back on topic (sorry).
Good question Ged...and good comments too
__________________


. My kitchen is for dancing. Bring me sunshine in a cup~emily dickinson. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
mollyanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 06:13 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
Mimizkitchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,607
Quote:
Originally Posted by mollyanne View Post
...i meant like a little Irish Jig here, a little Shimmy there...yeah, that's what i meant...uh huh...yeah
Uh huh Uh huh Uh huh
__________________
A woman is like a tea bag, you never no how strong she is until you put her in hot water...
Mimizkitchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 11:34 PM   #16
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 5
OK, I'm looking at the cookbook now, and you're right. It's called a caramel sauce, but you're supposed to make it first, then pour it into the cake pan. The custard mixture is poured on top of the sauce, then baked. I wonder if I need to invest in a candy thermometer to make sure I'm getting the correct heat? Hmmmn...

Here's the sauce recipe.

CARAMEL SAUCE
(makes about 1 1/2 cups)

1/2 cup water
1 cup (7 ounces) sugar
1 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice
1/8 tsp salt

Pour the water into a medium saucepan, then pour the sugar into the center of the pan (don't let it hit the pan sides). Gently stir the sugar with a clean spatula to wet it thoroughly. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and cook, without stirring, until the sugar has dissolved completely and the liquid has a faint golden color (about 300 degrees on a candy thermometer), 3 to 6 minutes.

Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the caramel has a dark amber color (about 350 degrees on a candy thermometer), 1 to 3 minutes.

Off the heat, slowly whisk in the cream until combined (the mixture will bubble and steam vigorously). Stir in the vanilla, lemon juice, and salt. Serve warm.
__________________
Ged is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2010, 10:18 AM   #17
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: japan
Posts: 462
Ged,

i wouldn't bother getting a candy thermometer yet, not unless you really feel like you need one. just go by the consistency first, and then by the color.

but before explaining that, first realize that you can take the suggested cooking times only as a vague guide, since we don't know whether the pan they were using was small or large, which would affect the time to a great degree.

here are the visual clues that will lead up to caramelization.

dip a spoon into the syrup, take it out, and watch how it drips.

- after maybe a minute or so of cooking, it'll runoff of the spoon pretty much like plain water, but a few drops on a saucer will feel sticky when cooled.

- then it'll thicken up and run off the spoon more like honey

- eventually, it'll make threads which harden like fiberglass. at this point keep a good watch on it, because it'll soon start to color. for your first time, i'd recommend turning the heat down to low at this point and proceeding slowly.

from this point on, proceed with your recipe paying attention to the color. again, for your first time, i'd recommend not going to too dark an amber, especially if you are using a thick, heavy pan.

some other points to be careful about:

- the closer you get to the end, the less advisable it is to stir, as you could end up with one suddenly granulated mass. stir slowly and only when necessary. i wouldn't stir until you add the cream.

- i 'd advise having the cream at room temperature at least and not adding it all at once, maybe a couple of tablespoons, stir slowly & gently, then 1/4 cup, then the rest.

- at a cup of cream to only 1 cup of sugar, i'd expect this to end up being around the consistency of honey; a lot more liquid than usual for caramel custard. you'll want to be very careful pouring in the custard mixture. you may want to put the baking pan in the fridge to firm up the sauce before adding the custard.


finally, this is a sauce to be used as a topping, like for ice cream or cake, etc., not the usual caramel for baked custard. let us know how it comes out. good luck
__________________
let me make sure that wine's ok before i use it.
philso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2010, 10:45 PM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 5
Thanks, philso (and everyone else, as well)! I'm going to take another run at it this weekend. I'll go over all your tips before I start. I look forward to posting good results!
__________________
Ged is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2010, 12:07 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: japan
Posts: 462
Ged,

here's something i stumbled on by chance.



critique: too sloppy stirring the sugar and getting it on the sides while telling you to be careful about doing so. note the build-up of white. also, it would be safer to add the cream in 2 or 3 parts. a larger pan would be safer. otherwise nice, and quite similar to your recipe.

after that i found these:



critique: thought i had learned a new trick re: using corn syrup, but if you look at the comments, quite a few people had theirs solidify. no wonder, with all that stirring.




critique: most advanced technique so far; without water. but i wouldn't recommend it for you until you've got some experience under your belt. i would have turned down the heat a bit more at the point where it started to smoke and you could notice a burnt, black spot , and then more gently but continuously swirled the sugar. too bad this video ended where it does. for your recipe, you would have added the cream at the point before she pours it into the bowl




critique: good video with the do and don't versions side by side. this is the traditional caramel for custard. using it strait from the pan to the cooking dish is usually fine, but on occasion, some of it will not thouroughly liquify during baking. if you (carefully) add a couple of tablespoons of boiling water at the end, you should never have any problems.




critique: best video of the lot. be careful of having your hands or face over the steam at the end. and obviously, he didn't pour the sauce into that plastic container until it had cooled considerably.

after watching these you should have a good idea of what to do, so i'll leave you to your own devices.

best of luck
__________________

__________________
let me make sure that wine's ok before i use it.
philso is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.