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Old 01-13-2012, 01:08 AM   #1
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Help wanted for making hash brown potatoes golden

Not long ago, I had breakfast at a well known family chain restaurant, with supposedly good cooks, yet I got some hashbrowns that weren't cooked well at all. In other words, it seems hashbrowns need some skill to be cooked just right. The places that have cooked consistently good golden hash browns for me were at small diners (greasy spoon joints). A 3 egg special of hash browns and toast. The cook brushed on butter to the big flat cooking surface before piling on the spuds.

I keep trying to duplicate that in my kitchen and am getting better at it, but other times, I end up with them being oil drenched, even tho the oil was hot enough, but they still don't come out golden brown. Spreading some butter on them while frying helped to get that golden color a few times.

I'm about to buy a good sized potato ricer after reading an article about how moisture is the reason for mushy un-golden hashbrowns. I've been using paper towels to soak up moisture, which is awkward because they stick to the paper towel. The article said that using paper towels isn't the way, leaves too much moisture. I cook them with a large pretty good quality non-stick pan and canola oil at high enough heat. Perhaps the non-stick isn't as good as using stainless steel? The oil never seems to spread itself evenly in a non-stick pan. That might be one reason, along with the moisture content.

I'm trying to achieve hashbrowns something like the pic below, often times mine turn out not so golden brown at all and oil soaked.

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Old 01-13-2012, 01:11 AM   #2
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frying the spuds in bacon grease and a dusting of paprika will help do the trick.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:20 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
frying the spuds in bacon grease and a dusting of paprika will help do the trick.
Ya, but the paprika seems like a visual effect shortcut. Bacon grease? Why? Not necessarily doubting you as I've had some good success frying with bacon grease rather than canola oil.

Edit: The article said don't rice the potatoes, just use it to squeeze all the water out, I knew you knew that.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:56 AM   #4
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Use Russet potatoes. Peel, boil in salted water until fork done. Remove from water and let steam dry. Grate them on a box grater. Using bacon grease is a good idea. It will give the potatoes flavor. If you have a square grill use that. You can spread out the grated potatoes and they will loose the moisture as they saute' Once you put them on the hot grill, do not play with them. Let them brown. If you have a bacon press, use it on the potatoes. When you think they have browned, (check after about three or four minutes) turn them over. Repeat the process.

If you have ever watched a cook in a diner, he puts everything on the grill and leaves the food alone while it cooks. The hash browns the diner uses are pre cooked. If the cook is not prepping his own potaotes, then he is purchasing them blanched and frozen from a restaurant purveyor. He dumps the whole bag about three pounds and they sit up in the corner of the grill getting warm and thawing out. When an order comes, he pulls some out of the pile, and cooks them as above. The grill where he cooks the taters is about 400F. If you notice he put them near where the bacon is. That is the hottest part of the grill. The eggs go to the lower temp. About 300F. There are probably four burners under the grill. Each one is set for a different temp. The burner where the taters are warming is about 250F. Most diners will also have the bacon, sausages or ham slices sitting up where the taters are so that they will cook faster when needed. There is a science to it all. You just have to be observant.
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Old 01-13-2012, 02:07 AM   #5
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bacon grease for both the taste and visual effect. paprika for both as well.
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Old 01-13-2012, 02:38 AM   #6
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[QUOTE=Addie;1095281]
If you have ever watched a cook in a diner /QUOTE]

Making those kind of golden hash browns in about 15 minutes is what I'm going for. I will use fresh or frozen, whatever gets me there to enjoy with a Breakfast Jack (egg ham and cheese on hamburger bun).

I might quicken up the hash browns by pan frying Ore-Ida Shredded Potato Patties. Gonna see how that goes. I might nuke em a bit first, or thaw them. I realize those ARE precooked, not just blanched and frozen.
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Old 01-13-2012, 06:44 AM   #7
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Butter, parboiled and thinly sliced or 3/8" cubes.
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Old 01-13-2012, 07:43 AM   #8
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Pan seal them for a perfect golden colour and finish cooking them in the oven (220 degrees Celsius) or in a deep fryer (170 degrees Celsius).
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Old 01-13-2012, 08:21 AM   #9
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"Don't play with them"-- +1 on that. Put them on the hot pan and LEAVE THEM ALONE. Works for browning chunks of meat for stew, as well.
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Old 01-13-2012, 08:48 AM   #10
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"Don't play with them"-- +1 on that. Put them on the hot pan and LEAVE THEM ALONE. Works for browning chunks of meat for stew, as well.
good advice, but hard to do--for me, anyway.
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