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Old 03-16-2007, 07:34 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by SizzlininIN
Last year I put in my first herb garden. The basil plants weren't on the big size so I thought what the heck and bought 4.....big mistake those things became monsters and I ultimately pulled them all up at the beginning of fall. I'm hoping the garden isn't taken over with offspring this year. What I want to do instead is pot one basil plant in a container and that way I can contain it and bring it in in the winter.

My rosemary did beautifully and thats one plant I think would grow into a tree if I let it.

I have to say its so great to be able to walk out your door and snip this and that fresh herb, not to mention how much you save not buying it in the stores.

I do plan to add a few different herbs this year. Last year it was Parsley, Basil, Rosemary, Thyme, Oregano, Marjoram and Dill. Its a wait and see to determine what survived the winter.
Oh yes forgot to mention I had Sage too.
I started my own little windowsill herb garden a few months ago. I'm going at it totally blind. I have no clue what I'm doing. I just planted some seeds in potting soil. The basil & parsley (in the same pot) are doing well. I also planted some thyme which seems to be doing okay & I just put some rosemary seeds on the other side of the thyme pot. How long will it take for all these to mature? Any pointers? Like . . . you're doing it all wrong! Any advice would be greatly appreciated! If I'm on the right road, I'd like to expand my little garden to include other herbs.
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:20 PM   #42
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When I had the greenhouses, and people to work for me, I grew all sorts of fresh herbs.
Now, I only grow my favorite 3...sweet basil, flat-leaf Italian parsely, and sage. One good healthy sage plant, when dried, will give me a year's supply. The other two are really only good when fresh, especially the basil.
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Old 03-17-2007, 08:43 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by ttbeachbum
During the growing season I have 2 types of basil, 2 types of parsley, oregano, cilantro, lemon thyme (that keeps trying to take over); rosemary and fennel outside my kitchen as staples. During the 'lean' months I resort to buying in the store fresh basil, parsley or cilantro. I clean and air dry oregano and rosemary during the winter months.
How do you dry herbs?
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Old 03-17-2007, 08:59 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by Drama Queen
I grow several of my own herbs, but if I don't grow them I buy them rather than use dried herbs. Fresh parsley and fresh basil are by no means the same as dried parsley or basil. The taste and the aroma are totally different and as far as I'm concerned you can actually ruin a dish with those two dried herbs. The only herb I prefer dried is oregano. It is actually a fact that dried oregano is more potent than fresh and develops a better flavor. I grow rosemary (tons of it lines my driveway) sage, marjoram, and thyme.
You use rosemary as a border in your driveway? How cool! I live in Va. Beach, VA, would it survive outside as part of a flower garden?
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Old 03-17-2007, 09:14 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by shannon in KS
I love fresh herbs, but like other have limited space. I always grow a LOT of flat and curly leaf parsley, then wash, de-stem, and freeze on cookie sheets, then place in freezer bags for the winter months. I can gaze and revel at a garden/ nursery for hours, rubbing the leaves between my fingers and breathing in the essence of how fresh the herb is. Like smelling the depths of a fine wine. Rosemary is my all-time favorite. I buy it only to sit by and smell, although I do not care for the flavor. It is wonderful infused in grapeseed oil in a warm window, and used for problem skin or during the winter months for colds. Our second favorite, is mint, plucked right off the plant and chewed. My daughter's favorite is the chocolate mint, and the summer becomes very disappointing if we cannot find it!!!
You know a lot about herbs! I had no idea rosemary was good for problem skin & colds. How is it used in that way? And what a great idea to let it sit in grapeseed oil on a windowsill. Bet it makes a great decoration too! Is there an actual chocolate mint herb or do you mix it? Also does your method of freezing parsley work for other herbs?
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Old 03-17-2007, 05:54 PM   #46
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How do you dry herbs?
I tie mine into bundles containing several stalks (depends on size of stalk of the variety being dried - usually my bundles are about an inch in circumference) using kitchen string and hang these in a dark, dry, and cool closet till completely dry. Try to keep them out of the light as this can decrease the flavour of the herbs. Once they are completely dry store them in dark glass bottles as light causes rapid deterioration in flavour.

Hope this helps ,

Tiffeny
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Old 03-17-2007, 06:57 PM   #47
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I started my own little windowsill herb garden a few months ago. I'm going at it totally blind. I have no clue what I'm doing. I just planted some seeds in potting soil. The basil & parsley (in the same pot) are doing well. I also planted some thyme which seems to be doing okay & I just put some rosemary seeds on the other side of the thyme pot. How long will it take for all these to mature? Any pointers? Like . . . you're doing it all wrong! Any advice would be greatly appreciated! If I'm on the right road, I'd like to expand my little garden to include other herbs.
There is actually a chocolate mint plant and a lot of other mints too! Here is a site that may be helpful to you. Actually it probably has more information than you want. http://http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/mint.htm
I think you will find that rosemary from seed will be quite difficult. You would do better to buy a plant.

Rosemary should grow outside in your area. I think you are in growing zone 8. Rosemary does ok up to zone 6. If you wanted to you could use other herbs in your landcaping. One of my favorites is sage (Salvia officinali) - I love it's beautiful lilac colored blooms against the grey/green leaves. Chives
are very easy to grow and produce violet globe shaped flowers. Herbs in general are very easy to grow outside and I would certainly consider that if I were you. I was pleasantly surprised when my daughters told me how much they had enjoyed the wonderful frangrances caused by the breezes ruffling through herb plants we landscaped our backyard with. One of their favorites is Bee Balm because it's abundant red blooms attracted humming birds. Our little dog even found a good use for thyme. He had allergies and his symptoms were releived by wallowing around on his back in the bed of thyme!
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Old 03-17-2007, 10:10 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiffeny
I tie mine into bundles containing several stalks (depends on size of stalk of the variety being dried - usually my bundles are about an inch in circumference) using kitchen string and hang these in a dark, dry, and cool closet till completely dry. Try to keep them out of the light as this can decrease the flavour of the herbs. Once they are completely dry store them in dark glass bottles as light causes rapid deterioration in flavour.

Hope this helps ,

Tiffeny
Yup, I've copy & pasted for when my herbs get plentiful enough for me to start drying them. Thanks!!
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Old 03-17-2007, 10:15 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by LRCooks
There is actually a chocolate mint plant and a lot of other mints too! Here is a site that may be helpful to you. Actually it probably has more information than you want. http://http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/mint.htm
I think you will find that rosemary from seed will be quite difficult. You would do better to buy a plant.

Rosemary should grow outside in your area. I think you are in growing zone 8. Rosemary does ok up to zone 6. If you wanted to you could use other herbs in your landcaping. One of my favorites is sage (Salvia officinali) - I love it's beautiful lilac colored blooms against the grey/green leaves. Chives
are very easy to grow and produce violet globe shaped flowers. Herbs in general are very easy to grow outside and I would certainly consider that if I were you. I was pleasantly surprised when my daughters told me how much they had enjoyed the wonderful frangrances caused by the breezes ruffling through herb plants we landscaped our backyard with. One of their favorites is Bee Balm because it's abundant red blooms attracted humming birds. Our little dog even found a good use for thyme. He had allergies and his symptoms were releived by wallowing around on his back in the bed of thyme!
This really helps! Thank you! This may even be enough incentive for me to take an interest in doing something with my flower beds!
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Old 03-17-2007, 10:36 PM   #50
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Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme Sorry, the herbs reminded me of a song, dont mind me
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