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Old 02-11-2011, 10:27 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Fuzzy View Post
You mention kelp and seaweed interchangeably... would Nori work?
Yes. Nori works well.

Miso soup is "supposed" to be made with Kombu (a type of kelp) but many people make it with Nori because its easier to get.

Shredded Nori is often used as a garnish for miso soup as well.

Nori is lighter and sweeter but will definitely give you the taste of authentic miso soup.
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Old 02-11-2011, 11:58 AM   #32
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Okay fuzzy, take an authentic lamb, beef or pork recipe and they would take a minimum of 60 mins to cook this does not work in your average "curry house" in the UK so the meat is pre-cooked in large batches in a pot with water flavored with a ground spice mix called Masala. The meat is then left to go cold. A base mix of pureed onion, garlic and ginger is fried in a wok, then they add the relevant spices and liquids from the authentic recipe, cook out for 5 mins then add the tender meat cook out for another 5 mins, tender lamb kurma in 12 mins.
Fuzzy if you go into an Indian Restaurant that offers a "Curry"using the same main ingredient hot, medium, or mild its non puka batch cooking.

The most popular national dish in the UK is Chicken Tikka Masala, a UK invention like General Tso's chicken was invented in the US.
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Old 02-11-2011, 12:50 PM   #33
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Interesting, BDF. Part of why I haven't wandered into the Middle Eastern curry implicit inquiry is that good food has a way of making itself at home no matter on what shore it finds itself.
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Old 02-11-2011, 05:57 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
Okay fuzzy, take an authentic lamb, beef or pork recipe and they would take a minimum of 60 mins to cook this does not work in your average "curry house" in the UK so the meat is pre-cooked in large batches in a pot with water flavored with a ground spice mix called Masala. The meat is then left to go cold. A base mix of pureed onion, garlic and ginger is fried in a wok, then they add the relevant spices and liquids from the authentic recipe, cook out for 5 mins then add the tender meat cook out for another 5 mins, tender lamb kurma in 12 mins.
Fuzzy if you go into an Indian Restaurant that offers a "Curry"using the same main ingredient hot, medium, or mild its non puka batch cooking.

The most popular national dish in the UK is Chicken Tikka Masala, a UK invention like General Tso's chicken was invented in the US.
Awesome! That's making my mouth water just thinking about it. Why is the meat left to go cold, though? I'm very new to cooking on my own, so I'll probably have a lot of dumb questions...

I'll make sure to look out for that.
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:28 AM   #35
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Fuzzy the reason the tender meat is cold is because you can handle it without it breaking up to much.
Cheats Chicken Tikka Masala.
Cube chicken breast, marinade overnight in a mix of tandoori powder and yoghurt, thread the meat on metal skewers and cook under a very hot grill or on the bbq, take the meat off the skewers and cool.
Heat some veg oil in the wok and add a tsp of cummin seeds fry for 30 seconds, add 1tbls of garlic puree fry for 60 sec, add 6 tbls of onion puree and fry fo 2 to 3 mins, add 2tbls of shop bought medium curry paste, Itbls of tom ketchup, 1tbls of brown sugar, I tbls of tom chutney, 1 tbls of ground almonds, fry a bit then add the meat 7 fl oz of cream, 3 fl of coconut milk mix and heat through.
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:13 AM   #36
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I forgot to add this blog Mamata is a legend among Curryholics in the UK so I hope this link works if it does click on search tick indian then put which meat or fish into the search box.
http://www.mamtaskitchen.com
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:20 PM   #37
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I forgot to add this blog Mamata is a legend among Curryholics in the UK so I hope this link works if it does click on search tick indian then put which meat or fish into the search box.
Mamta's Kitchen
*favorites* Thanks for the info!
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Old 02-13-2011, 06:12 PM   #38
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Thumbs up

The miso ramen was a success! The only criticism I had with it was I had to extend the recipe to serve six so it turned out a bit weak, because I guess it's not just tripling the recipe, you have to triple it PLUS some. For next time, I'll add more ginger and miso. And probably some more sake.

I got some curries to experiment with, now I just need some pork or something to fix with it.
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Old 02-14-2011, 03:36 AM   #39
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Fuzzy mate you said you were new to cooking so my best tip, never serve anything without tasting it first.
Seasoning is everything, I will fry a little of my hamburger , meatloaf or ball, sausage, stuffing mix ect before using.
Patisserie is Alchemi so stick to the recipe, again I dont want to sound pompous but with baking I can smell when things are cooked, with certain cakes I can even hear when they are ready.
Touch is also a skill you will learn for fish or steak cooking.
Form an 0 by resting the tip of your first finger on the tip of your thumb, feel the flesh below, prod your steak with your finger and if it feels the same the steak is rare, do the same with the second finger for medium, the third finger for well done.
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Old 02-14-2011, 12:41 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
Fuzzy mate you said you were new to cooking so my best tip, never serve anything without tasting it first.
Seasoning is everything, I will fry a little of my hamburger , meatloaf or ball, sausage, stuffing mix ect before using.
Patisserie is Alchemi so stick to the recipe, again I dont want to sound pompous but with baking I can smell when things are cooked, with certain cakes I can even hear when they are ready.
Touch is also a skill you will learn for fish or steak cooking.
Form an 0 by resting the tip of your first finger on the tip of your thumb, feel the flesh below, prod your steak with your finger and if it feels the same the steak is rare, do the same with the second finger for medium, the third finger for well done.
Ooooh, that's really interesting!

I did taste it, and I added more miso and tasted it again. I don't quite know why it tasted okay then, but a little weak in a bowl.
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