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Old 10-28-2012, 06:11 PM   #41
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I use light olive oil or canola oil. Even use light olive for cooking, keep the extra virgin for dressings etc.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:02 PM   #42
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Thanks everybody, and thanks to Phil too who sent me a PM with a link to this YouTube video:

Homemade mayonnaise recipe - BBC Good Food - YouTube

I feel kind of silly having wasted so much time over-thinking it since the video did it all in 2-1/2 minutes! I never thought of making my own mayonnaise until I read Michael Ruhlman's book Ratio. He devoted 10 pages of his book to making mayonnaise, 5 on basic Mayo 101 and the other half on mayo recipes. His discussion was very thorough and exacting and gave me the impression that making mayo was difficult unless you were properly prepared. And now I've seen the video and it looks like you can just put everything in your immersion blender's cup and whack it into mayo.

My first mistake was that I didn't notice the immersion blender's blades were too far recessed to reach my initial ingredients. (Second verse, same as the first!) I had not wanted to risk a larger amount of ingredients until I had my first success. Apparently I could have just doubled everything and put it in the blender cup and it would have been a success.

Often in life we learn more from our mistakes than we learn from our successes, so I think I've got the mayo 411 now, just waiting for the right opportunity to have a purpose for a batch of mayo before I try again. (And right now all I have is some very green EVOO and I think I'd like to use an oil that has less color.)

It appears that I may be making spicy tuna roll this afternoon/evening, which recipe uses mayo + Sriracha sauce as the base, then combine with chopped sushi grade tuna and add to sushi rice and nori via the usual method. I'm not quite sure the difference between store mayo and home mayo would be at all obvious in this recipe so I'll probably wait for another day and another oil before I tackle the mayo recipe again.

More thoughts, particularly responding to Phil's post. Just to summarize since I'll have to write his recipe down anyway:

2 egg yolks
2 T. white vinegar
2 T. lemon juice
1/2 t. salt
1/2 t. sugar
1/2 t. dry mustard
2 cups vegetable oil, OO, corn, whatever...

Salmonella? Doesn't bother me at all. When I was a child my mother used to make me and my sister eggnogs for an afternoon drink, a cup of milk, a raw egg, a teaspoon of sugar and a cap full of vanilla extract. By the time I was 12 I was making my own eggnogs. (Who needs mommy anyway? ) I've eaten countless raw eggs and never had the slightest problem. Evidently I have a military grade immune system too, I just don't get sick. I'm not bothered by eating raw eggs although proper food preparation procedures should be followed.

Ruhlman made the comment in his book that far lesser amounts of egg yolks than usually used will do the job perfectly fine. "Working with a cup of oil as the standard measure, I made mayonnaise with 1/4 teaspoon of yolk. The results were that it was possible to emulsify 6 ounces of oil into 1 teaspoon of water and 1/4 teaspoon of yolk, before it broke. Using 2 teaspoons of water, I emulsified 7 ounces of oil before it broke. Then I used a teaspoon of yolk. A mayonnaise using 1 teaspoon water and that amount of yolk again broke at about 7 ounces. (And I could see ahead of time that it was going to break because the mayonnaise grew very thick and then very shiny.) It may be possible to use smaller quantities of yolk, but given all the things that can go wrong in the process, a healthy teaspoon, rather than a stingy 1/4 teaspoon, proved most practical in this experiment." (Ratio by Michael Ruhlman, p. 168)

So evidently 1 yolk is quite enough to emulsify 8 oz. of vegetable oil. And also evidently, his exacting process is not required. It looks to me like you could add all the wet ingredients (except oil) to your blender cup, add the dry ingredients, maybe give it a quick burst from the blender, then throw in the oil and whack it with a stick to get mayo.

I'll try making mayo again one day soon (this week).
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:03 PM   #43
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Did you watch the video that I posted? You could have watched me make mayo. I use the same method that the lady in the BBC video used. Our ingredients are a bit different.

1 room temperature egg (I usually use the whole egg but the yolk is what you have to have.
Juice of 1 lime
a pinch of salt (optional its only for taste)
1/2 cup of oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
So evidently 1 yolk is quite enough to emulsify 8 oz. of vegetable oil. And also evidently, his exacting process is not required. It looks to me like you could add all the wet ingredients (except oil) to your blender cup, add the dry ingredients, maybe give it a quick burst from the blender, then throw in the oil and whack it with a stick to get mayo.
Put all the wet ingredients in and make your mayo then add the dry or it may not emulsify. I do make it with the salt in but adding more ingredients than that has caused me problems.
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:22 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
Very simple to make. But do not use cold eggs, bring them up to room temp first.

This is how I make it
Nice video. Your method is much simpler than the what I did for blender mayo and it looks like the texture is thicker too.
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:31 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Nice video. Your method is much simpler than the what I did for blender mayo and it looks like the texture is thicker too.
When I do not get in a hurry and let it start to really emulsify before I start moving the blender to soon it does have a nice texture. But If I start moving to soon (and introducing more oil) it turns out thin.
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:06 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
Did you watch the video that I posted? You could have watched me make mayo. I use the same method that the lady in the BBC video used. Our ingredients are a bit different.

1 room temperature egg (I usually use the whole egg but the yolk is what you have to have.
Juice of 1 lime
a pinch of salt (optional its only for taste)
1/2 cup of oil



Put all the wet ingredients in and make your mayo then add the dry or it may not emulsify. I do make it with the salt in but adding more ingredients than that has caused me problems.
Sorry! I spent 2 hours figuring out how to get YouTube to show up in my Internet connected device (a Blu Ray player.) I had been putting off this confrontation until "later," and later turned out to be a few hours ago. I only today figured out how to watch YT videos on my TV.
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Old 10-29-2012, 11:07 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
Long story short I figured it out yesterday. The immersion blender's blades are too deeply recessed to contact the yolk/oil mixture until I had 2-3 ounces of oil added, and by then the blender caused the mixture to break. All the blender was doing is making noise and my tired imagination filled in.

So I decided to do it and forget the stick blender, but discovered that I don't have any whisks around. I tried it using just a spoon and broke my arm. Well, truth is my arm got tired and all I had added was the yolk, water and a bit of oil.

I'll make it maybe tomorrow since I think I'm doing spicy tuna roll and want to use home made mayo instead of store bought.

So I bought a whisk but I had company tonight and didn't have time to cook or prepare stuff that wasn't on the menu.

Which brings to mind another question. My EVOO makes greenish mayonnaise... and simple to see why. I just made a batch of Castile soap last weekend using the classic ingredients: EVOO, lye, water, and it came out greenish too. The greenish olive oil soap is kind of nice but I think I want my mayonnaise to be more white. I looked at a bottle of Best Foods mayonnaise and they list ingredients as soy bean oil and olive oil (in that order).

So what oils have you all been using?
My dear friend while I was in grad school was from Larissa, Greece. Her family owned an olive orchard. She would smuggle olive oil back from Greece--it was always green (best, best olive oil I've ever tasted). If the EVOO you are using is "greenish" than the mayo will also be greenish. Just means you are using the best, best olive oil.
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Old 10-30-2012, 02:20 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
My dear friend while I was in grad school was from Larissa, Greece. Her family owned an olive orchard. She would smuggle olive oil back from Greece--it was always green (best, best olive oil I've ever tasted). If the EVOO you are using is "greenish" than the mayo will also be greenish. Just means you are using the best, best olive oil.
Yeah! Like I said I made some soap with it (Castile) and it came out greenish, and that's good in Castile.

But it seems a little unappetizing in my mayonnaise.

I got some corn oil today (very inexpensive) and bought a whisk too. Only thing I didn't have was the time to get it done. But I had a good time doing other stuff...
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:23 PM   #49
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Here's an update on this topic. I finally succeeded in making mayo. I guess I was just trying too hard before.

I followed Ruhlman's recipe from his book Ratio using my new whisk and the afore mentioned corn oil. It nearly broke my arm but I stirred 8-10 oz. of corn oil into the egg yolk, water, salt and lemon, and just whisked it up adding the oil slowly. (Picture attached.)

I had some today on BLTB for breakfast (BLT on an everything bagel) and it was good, although not sure I noticed any difference from same before. I used meat market bacon instead of supermarket bacon to that was very good.

I'm considering having sashimi & sushi for dinner tomorrow, and I might make spicy tuna rolls using this mayo. The filling is chopped tuna plus mayo and some Sriracha sauce to spike it up. That's how you get from tuna rolls to spicy tuna rolls. I think it might be a recipe more likely to show off home made mayo vs. store mayo.

A question about the video: you just put everything in a cup and hit it with your stick blender? It's that easy??? It looked like a whole egg, lemon juice, salt, and I forgot now if water was added. Then all the oil and just whip it up with your stick?

I don't know why I failed before (except the part about the SB blades not hitting the yolk mix until I had added some oil). But according to the video I should have eventually whipped my recipe into mayo in the end. I don't know why it failed...

So you just put everything in the SB cup and hit it with your SB and you end up with mayo?

Oh and truth be told I didn't really break my arm. It was just tired. But don't go expecting the truth out of me too often, it would ruin my reputation as a prevaricator.
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:38 PM   #50
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Greg, ATK this season did a spot on SB. They found that the ones with the blade closer to the bottom and had the side holes above the blade did the best job. The fact that yours was not reaching the egg yolk until you added the oil could have had this problem of the blade being too high up and the holes lower than the blade.
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