"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-16-2011, 02:03 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 476
Homemade Yogurt

I was watching Jamie Oliver the other day and saw him prepare homemade yogurt. It was really simple.

1 ltr full fat milk, and 1 container of plain yogurt. All you had to do was bring the milk up to a simmer, and turn off the heat. Allow the milk to cool down to body temp and add the yogurt and place in the fridge. It was supposed to make yogurt overnight.

After 2 days it is just milk with some yogurt mixed in. What went wrong? Does anyone have a tried and true Yogurt that doesn't linger on the counter for 10 hours?

Thanks for your help!

__________________

__________________
Happy Cooking!!
Joy

betterthanabox.org
betterthanabox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2011, 02:08 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,370
You have to buy yogurt that contains live/active yogurt-making cultures. Some do, some don't. If you did get live culture yogurt, then I'd guess the milk was too hot when you added the yogurt and the heat killed the cultures.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2011, 02:40 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 476
Could I save it buy just adding more yogurt?
__________________
Happy Cooking!!
Joy

betterthanabox.org
betterthanabox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2011, 02:45 PM   #4
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,370
Yes but you'd have to go through the heating and cooling process again.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2011, 03:22 AM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,882
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
What Andy said.

Well, it might still be growing, but very slowly.

I make yoghurt fairly often. I never heard of putting in the fridge. I try to keep mine a bit over body temperature.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2011, 05:41 AM   #6
Master Chef
 
DaveSoMD's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,038
One of the magazines I get had an article and recipes for homemade yogurt using a crock-pot. If I can find the article I will PM you the recipe and instructions.
__________________
Quoth the chicken, "Fry some more."
AB - Good Eats: Fry Hard II
DaveSoMD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2011, 06:06 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,537
My Mom had a yogurt making kit, it included glass bowls and an electric heating unit. The starter was mixed with milk and the bowls were warmed on the heating unit overnight.

In the morning, the bowls of yogurt were transferred to the refrigerator.
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2011, 10:21 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveSoMD View Post
One of the magazines I get had an article and recipes for homemade yogurt using a crock-pot. If I can find the article I will PM you the recipe and instructions.
That would be great Dave.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
What Andy said.

Well, it might still be growing, but very slowly.

I make yoghurt fairly often. I never heard of putting in the fridge. I try to keep mine a bit over body temperature.
It's too late now, I dumped it out. It just looked like milk with some small chunks on the bottom. I don't think it worked. Maybe it had to do with using greek plain yogurt (that was all the store had.) I am on the hunt for a new recipe now.
__________________
Happy Cooking!!
Joy

betterthanabox.org
betterthanabox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2011, 11:29 AM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,882
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Make sure that the yoghurt you use to start your homemade yoghurt has live lacto bacillus. It might say on the package. You can buy starter at most health food stores, but I have never tried that.

Use 1 - 1.5 tablespoons of yoghurt per cup of milk. Add room temperature yoghurt to the milk after it has been scalded and allowed to cool to 105-110F (That's warmer than your skin, but not uncomfortably warm.)

I use a heating pad to keep my yoghurt warm while it is growing.

I took a 1 litre canning jar and filled with water. I put plastic wrap over the top and stuck my instant read thermometer through the plastic wrap, into the water. I then wrapped the jar with the heating pad, tied it with a string, and turned it on. This was to see how hot it would make my yoghurt. I tried with all three settings.

I now have a string tied around my heating pad all the time, keeping it in a sleeve shape. I just slip the jar of milk (with plastic wrap and thermometer) into the sleeve. I put a small inverted ramekin at the bottom. I found that the very bottom of the jar wasn't getting properly heated when it sat on the table.

In the past I have used methods like heating the oven to about 100F and turning off. Then leave the milk with culture in the oven and turn on the oven for a half a minute every once in a while. I have wrapped the jars in towels to keep them warm; placed them near the wood stove, etc.

Save some of your new yoghurt for the next batch. I find that subsequent batches taste even better.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2011, 01:26 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Make sure that the yoghurt you use to start your homemade yoghurt has live lacto bacillus. It might say on the package. You can buy starter at most health food stores, but I have never tried that.

Use 1 - 1.5 tablespoons of yoghurt per cup of milk. Add room temperature yoghurt to the milk after it has been scalded and allowed to cool to 105-110F (That's warmer than your skin, but not uncomfortably warm.)

I use a heating pad to keep my yoghurt warm while it is growing.

I took a 1 litre canning jar and filled with water. I put plastic wrap over the top and stuck my instant read thermometer through the plastic wrap, into the water. I then wrapped the jar with the heating pad, tied it with a string, and turned it on. This was to see how hot it would make my yoghurt. I tried with all three settings.

I now have a string tied around my heating pad all the time, keeping it in a sleeve shape. I just slip the jar of milk (with plastic wrap and thermometer) into the sleeve. I put a small inverted ramekin at the bottom. I found that the very bottom of the jar wasn't getting properly heated when it sat on the table.

In the past I have used methods like heating the oven to about 100F and turning off. Then leave the milk with culture in the oven and turn on the oven for a half a minute every once in a while. I have wrapped the jars in towels to keep them warm; placed them near the wood stove, etc.

Save some of your new yoghurt for the next batch. I find that subsequent batches taste even better.

Do you use a particular type of milk? Could I use say 1%? The recipe I used before was whole milk.
__________________

__________________
Happy Cooking!!
Joy

betterthanabox.org
betterthanabox is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
homemade

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.