"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-25-2013, 05:56 PM   #11
Head Chef
 
KatyCooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hampshire
Posts: 1,135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Cobean View Post
do you leave the lid on the pan?if you do this can raise the temperature in the pan & cause it to boil over.i peel me spuds,cut them in same size chunks so that they cook at the time,as rocketj said,rinse in a few changes of water to remove starch,put in pan of cold water,add salt,bring to boil with lid on to speed up boiling then move lid slightly to one side to allow steam to escape & turn heat down to simmer.i use a ricer too,they are ace!!
Hey, no fair! Your ricer has holes in the sides as well as the bottom - mine doesn't! Do I have a sub-standard potato ricer?
__________________

__________________
KatyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 05:58 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Countrywalks View Post
Hi to everyone here, this is my first post and as you can tell im new to kooking so i need some very simple basics to get me a good start so i dont pick up any bad habits from the start.

How do i boil red desiree potatoes?

my cooker goes from one to six 0 = off
if i put them on 6 they bubble and throth up and over flowing the saucepan, and on 2 they seem to simmer, and on 3 they boil very gentle, and on 4 they start to over flow the pan again, so how do you guys do it?

the potato will be used for mash when they are soft.

TIA
Never mind the numbers. Just adjust the flame so it keeps the pan at a gentle boil. As others say, a ricer is very useful but I use my electric hand mixer although you have to watch you don't go too far and produce wall paper paste.

Welcome to DC, There are a few of us Brits here and the Americans make us feel very welcome.
__________________

__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 06:47 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,229
For mashed I peel and cube the taters to roughly equal size chunks.

Throw the spuds in a pot and cover with water.

Bring to a high simmer or low boil and cook until a fork pierces them easily.

I don't use a ricer. I drain and mash the taters with a masher. Then add butter. milk, and seasonings in the proportions desired.

I whip them up with a spoon and all is good to go.

I'm one of those who doesn't mind a few small lumps because it tells me they are real potatoes and not those boxed delights. But I do appreciate silky smooth mashed taters.

As mentioned earlier, Don't over whip or you'll get glue. And if boil over is a problem then use a bigger pot.


And as always. Experiment and enjoy.

Anyone can cook. It's just that some don't know it yet.
__________________
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 08:17 PM   #14
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatyCooks View Post
Hey, no fair! Your ricer has holes in the sides as well as the bottom - mine doesn't! Do I have a sub-standard potato ricer?
I've had both kinds. Holes on the side squirt the potatoes into undesired locations.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
...I'm one of those who doesn't mind a few small lumps because it tells me they are real potatoes and not those boxed delights...
If you're making the mashed, don't you already know they aren't from a box?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 08:21 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
KatyCooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hampshire
Posts: 1,135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I've had both kinds. Holes on the side squirt the potatoes into undesired locations.

Guess I won't toss it out in disgust then!
__________________
KatyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 08:37 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,875
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
It's a good idea to heat the milk or cream before adding it to the mashed potatoes.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 08:46 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
KatyCooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hampshire
Posts: 1,135
I don't usually add milk or cream to my mash. I always add butter though. I guess I prefer a slightly less "creamy" mash because I usually serve it with a stew and the slightly drier mash is great for soaking up the gravy.

But TL, I assume you recommend warming the milk/cream because otherwise it would cool the mash down too much?
__________________
KatyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 08:48 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,875
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatyCooks View Post
I don't usually add milk or cream to my mash. I always add butter though. I guess I prefer a slightly less "creamy" mash because I usually serve it with a stew and the slightly drier mash is great for soaking up the gravy.

But TL, I assume you recommend warming the milk/cream because otherwise it would cool the mash down too much?
Bingo, give the lady a cupie doll.

I often make mashed potatoes with potato water instead of milk or cream.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 08:57 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
KatyCooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hampshire
Posts: 1,135
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Bingo, give the lady a cupie doll.

I often make mashed potatoes with potato water instead of milk or cream.
Do you ever add blue cheese to your mash TL? I love to crumble in something like Stilton. Only problem is I often end up just scoffing half of it there and then!
__________________
KatyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 08:59 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,875
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatyCooks View Post
Do you ever add blue cheese to your mash TL? I love to crumble in something like Stilton. Only problem is I often end up just scoffing half of it there and then!
Nope, never thought of it. Stilton! We had that for the first time last year. Swoon, that is one lovely cheese.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
oil, potato, potatoes

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.