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Old 04-23-2011, 09:51 AM   #1
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How do I make gravy?

hello! I'd like to make some gravy English style, can anybody help me?

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Old 04-23-2011, 09:58 AM   #2
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Is English style different from North American?

I generally use the pan I've cooked a roast in (beef, pork or chicken...doesn't matter) and place it on a stovetop element. I put a little water in and use a whisk to scrape off the darker bits on the bottom. That's where all the flavor is. In a jar, or tupperware container with a lid. (Something with a good seal) I put about 1/2 cup of flour and 2 cups of water. I shake the living daylights out of it until there are no lumps and pour that into the water in the pan. Stir constantly til gravy is thickened, and add more water to achieve desired consistency.

This is not the "usual" way to make gravy, but it works for me. I like to pour off as much of the liquified fat as I can before I start so that's why I use this method.
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Old 04-23-2011, 10:03 AM   #3
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I agree with Alix. The only thing is don't do the stove top with a glass dish. Trust me, I had to learn the hard way!

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Old 04-23-2011, 10:11 AM   #4
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dear alix thank you for your replay i really don't know if there's a difference between english and american style gravy making I used to enjoy it with rostbeef when I was much younger and went to England From Sicily To Improve my English and lived for a while with an English family in Hastings.
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Old 04-23-2011, 10:12 AM   #5
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I made a beef stew yesterday, and used fatty stock as well as the fat "clumps" from the steaks I used.

I put it in the fridge overnight, so I should have some really tasty fat on top to use to thicken the juices into gravy.
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Old 04-23-2011, 10:18 AM   #6
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thank you
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Old 04-23-2011, 10:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
I agree with Alix. The only thing is don't do the stove top with a glass dish. Trust me, I had to learn the hard way!

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Oh ya. Me too. NO PYREX ON STOVETOP!
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Old 04-23-2011, 11:03 AM   #8
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Quote:
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hello! I'd like to make some gravy English style, can anybody help me?
Welcome to DC.

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Old 04-24-2011, 05:56 PM   #9
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I always use a roux (pronounced roo) when I make gravy, especially chicken or turkey gravy because you can make it darker and richer than what comes in a can or jar. Take the meat or poultry out of the roasting pan, set it on a carving board and tent it with aluminium foil to rest. Pour the juices into a clear glass or plastic container, or a gravy spearator, and allow the fat to rise to the top. Skim off the fat, then put 4 Tbs of the fat and 4 Tbs of flour into a pot large enough to hold the pan drippings you have left after removing all the fat. Over medium to medium high heat, constantly stir the fat/flour mixture as it cooks. The mixture will get darker the longer you cook it. I usually stop at caramel colour. Now slowly pour about 1/2 cup of the skimmed pan drippings (and I do mean slowly because the first bit that hits the pan is going to spit and sputter) stirring until blended. Turn the temperature to high and bring the gravy to a boil. As it boils, add more drippings until the desired viscosity is attained. Season to taste with salt and pepper. If you've added all the drippings and it's still to thick, you can add a little bit of water.
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Old 04-24-2011, 06:04 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
I always use a roux (pronounced roo) when I make gravy, especially chicken or turkey gravy because you can make it darker and richer than what comes in a can or jar. Take the meat or poultry out of the roasting pan, set it on a carving board and tent it with aluminium foil to rest. Pour the juices into a clear glass or plastic container, or a gravy spearator, and allow the fat to rise to the top. Skim off the fat, then put 4 Tbs of the fat and 4 Tbs of flour into a pot large enough to hold the pan drippings you have left after removing all the fat. Over medium to medium high heat, constantly stir the fat/flour mixture as it cooks. The mixture will get darker the longer you cook it. I usually stop at caramel colour. Now slowly pour about 1/2 cup of the skimmed pan drippings (and I do mean slowly because the first bit that hits the pan is going to spit and sputter) stirring until blended. Turn the temperature to high and bring the gravy to a boil. As it boils, add more drippings until the desired viscosity is attained. Season to taste with salt and pepper. If you've added all the drippings and it's still to thick, you can add a little bit of water.
That's pretty much what I do. Thanks for saving me all that typing.

I make roux out of all the fat and put the excess roux in a small jar. Then I have spare roux for another day (it will keep in the fridge for weeks) or if I accidentally add too much liquid.
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