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Old 06-23-2014, 09:58 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Nuke it!
No.

All that will do is take any piece of meat and make it rubber.

Oddly enough though, a microwave is one of the best ways to cook a whole lobster. . . so long as you don't over nuke it.
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Old 06-24-2014, 08:41 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by creative View Post
If you have the forethought to marinade the meat beforehand (for several hours or overnight), then this will help the tenderising process.
From Shirley Corriher, respected food scientist:

"
There is a commonly held belief that soaking a tough cut of meat in a marinade will make it tender. Sadly, this just isn't true much of the time. While some marinades are very successful at adding flavor to meat, chicken, and fish, they are, with one exception, a disaster at tenderizing."

http://www.finecooking.com/articles/...tenderize.aspx
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Old 06-24-2014, 11:42 AM   #13
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hmm pressure cookers cost alot i preusme? anyhow i dont have one so i was thinking ill just plan ahead and cook it when i wake up, maybe leav eit boiling for a cpl hours then put it in with the sauce later.

does it cost alot of money to have the cooker on for the extra few hours over time such that it would be a better investment to get a pressure cooker?
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Old 06-24-2014, 12:07 PM   #14
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The cost of the PC is more a cost of convenience than gas use. A PC gives you the ability to prepare a meal in a short period of time that typically takes longer. In many recipes, cooking time with a PC is 1/3 of the normal cooking time.
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Old 06-24-2014, 02:09 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
From Shirley Corriher, respected food scientist:

"
There is a commonly held belief that soaking a tough cut of meat in a marinade will make it tender. Sadly, this just isn't true much of the time. While some marinades are very successful at adding flavor to meat, chicken, and fish, they are, with one exception, a disaster at tenderizing."

Marinades Add Flavor but Don' t Always Tenderize
Right-o. It's very easy to replicate the experiment to demonstrate the limitations of marinading. Make up any sort of marinade you want. (Use cheap stuff, because, while you're not going to make the meat poisonous, you may make it unappetizing.) Add food dye to the marinade. Bright color that will contrast with the meat. Marinade as usual. Cut the meat and observe how little the marinade penetrated. No matter what the marinade is capable of doing, it can only affect the outer 1/8-inch of the meat. It's not that marinade has no place. I think it does bind bold flavors, especially acidic flavors, to the meat. That is, of course, if you're trying to intrude on the meat's natural flavor. I rub, but I don't marinate.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:02 PM   #16
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hmm pressure cookers cost alot i preusme? anyhow i dont have one so i was thinking ill just plan ahead and cook it when i wake up, maybe leav eit boiling for a cpl hours then put it in with the sauce later.

does it cost alot of money to have the cooker on for the extra few hours over time such that it would be a better investment to get a pressure cooker?

Boiling meat makes it tough. It should be cooked at a very gentle simmer.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:51 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT View Post
No.

All that will do is take any piece of meat and make it rubber.

Oddly enough though, a microwave is one of the best ways to cook a whole lobster. . . so long as you don't over nuke it.
That is true if starting with raw meat, but if you have a piece of meat that has been cooked but not is not tender enough to shred, the microwave is one way to go.
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:08 PM   #18
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Right-o. It's very easy to replicate the experiment to demonstrate the limitations of marinading. Make up any sort of marinade you want. (Use cheap stuff, because, while you're not going to make the meat poisonous, you may make it unappetizing.) Add food dye to the marinade. Bright color that will contrast with the meat. Marinade as usual. Cut the meat and observe how little the marinade penetrated. No matter what the marinade is capable of doing, it can only affect the outer 1/8-inch of the meat. It's not that marinade has no place. I think it does bind bold flavors, especially acidic flavors, to the meat. That is, of course, if you're trying to intrude on the meat's natural flavor. I rub, but I don't marinate.
Yes. The current issue of Cooks Illustrated has a recipe for chicken souvlaki (Greek grilled chicken and vegetables on skewers). They recommend putting a little marinade on the ingredients before grilling, then tossing the ingredients with reserved marinade, aka vinaigrette, after grilling. I made a variation of this with Mexican flavors and DH and I loved it.
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