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Old 06-06-2012, 11:49 AM   #31
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In The Netherlands we generally take the 'lid' off and eat the bottom...at least that is how I do it!

Tompouce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-06-2012, 07:22 PM   #32
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In The Netherlands we generally take the 'lid' off and eat the bottom...at least that is how I do it!

Tompouce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Me too.
Welcome to DC, Pamala. Keep your fingers out of those dykes .
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Old 06-06-2012, 07:57 PM   #33
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I stab it with my fork and when I'm lucky, it breaks the top piece of pastry and I can get a mouthful on the fork. Often it scooshes out the sides.
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Old 07-31-2017, 02:52 PM   #34
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I know that this is a very old thread, but just in case it might still help someone to know:

The first thing to understand is that it's only in the USA that it's called a Napoleon. Nobody else(where) in the world will have a clue what you're talking about.

In French, where the thing is from, it's called un millefeuille. (Actually, there is some controversy over whether it's properly called un millefeuille, un mille feuille, or un mille-feuille. There are even (French) illiterates who think it might be un mille feuilles, un mille-feuilles, or un mille-feuilles.

And just when you thought you were done with the French grammar/spelling lesson, I need to warn you NOT to confuse any of those pastry names with the (French) name of the Common Yarrow (flower/plant), which -- believe it or not -- is called in French La Millefeuille. (Its full name is L'Achillée Millefeuille, but people generally just call it la Millefeuille).

To summarize: Le Millefeuille is the pastry, la millefeuille is the flower. C'est logique!!

Now, if you look up "comment manger un millefeuille," you'll see that the French have just as much trouble as anyone else eating it.
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Old 07-31-2017, 04:40 PM   #35
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Mille Feuille = A Napolean:

I divide the layers in half enabling easier slicing.

Then a Sharp knife & a fork ..

Gorgeous dessert ..
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Old 07-31-2017, 05:32 PM   #36
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I know that this is a very old thread, but just in case it might still help someone to know:

The first thing to understand is that it's only in the USA that it's called a Napoleon. Nobody else(where) in the world will have a clue what you're talking about...
If you read a bit of the attached, you'll see the name Napoleon is more widespread than you thought.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mille-feuille
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Old 07-31-2017, 05:46 PM   #37
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I know that this is a very old thread, but just in case it might still help someone to know:

The first thing to understand is that it's only in the USA that it's called a Napoleon. Nobody else(where) in the world will have a clue what you're talking about.

...
Living in Israel one would think that you've met plenty of Russians who do in fact call Napoleon - Napoleon. So, that's whole ex Soviet Union. 15 countries that is nowadays.
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Old 08-01-2017, 12:05 AM   #38
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In Danish it's either a Napoleon or a Napoleonskage (Napoleon cake).
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Old 08-01-2017, 01:36 AM   #39
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Live and learn. I truly (and obviously) had no idea. And sadly, I'm not sure I've ever seen one for sale in Israel.

Funny that the Russians would call the thing after a loser like Napoleon :). (loser to them, that is)
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Old 08-01-2017, 02:33 PM   #40
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Live and learn. I truly (and obviously) had no idea. And sadly, I'm not sure I've ever seen one for sale in Israel.

Funny that the Russians would call the thing after a loser like Napoleon :). (loser to them, that is)
Looser or not, but in the Tzars days all nobility had nannies and cooks who were French. Russian cuisine is heavily affected by French cuisine. Famous gefilte fish came to Russia from France.
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