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Old 04-30-2013, 10:03 AM   #21
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I have copied and pasted Forty's recipe. That sounds yummy.

I'm not really much of a fan of chili. I don't like beans in my chili, but black beans are okay.
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Old 04-30-2013, 10:56 AM   #22
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That's a good looking recipe, forty.
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Old 04-30-2013, 11:31 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by forty_caliber View Post
This is a secret recipe not usually shared with those who weren't lucky enough to be born in the Lone Star State, but in the interest of furthering understanding and promoting cultural exchange, I'll share it publicly this once...after all it's not your fault.

OFFICIAL STATE OF TEXAS

Texas Red Chili

The official food of The State of Texas is chili. A sure fire method to start an argument in Texas is to talk about chili. This recipe is quite simply known as Texas Red. In a rare meeting of both houses, The Texas State Legislature has unanimously decreed that: "Texas Red shall be composed of only meat and sauce. There are no beans, no rice, no noodles, nor any other fillers in this dish. This meat will be beef. No pork, chicken, rabbit or any other non beef ingredient shall now, or ever be used in Texas Red. This chili will be hot and spicy. Hot enough to make a seasoned cowhand sweat in February or small children cry at the very mention of the dish"

INGREDIENTS
2 pounds ground beef or chili grind chuck, sub 1/4" cubes of chuck if desired
1 14.5 can diced tomatoes
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 cups chicken stock or water
1/4 cup red chili powder
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 medium onion, chopped fine
1 1/2 teaspoons oregano
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 1/2 tablespoons cumin, ground
1 teaspoon cayenne, rounded (to taste)
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons vegetable oil or bacon grease.
Salt and pepper to taste.

INSTRUCTIONS
1. Heat oil or bacon grease in a enameled cast iron dutch oven over medium heat.
Crumble in meat, break up any lumps with a wooden spoon and cook, stirring
occasionally until meat is well browned. Drain off all fat and return meat to pot.
2. Add flour and stir to coat beef continue to cook for 1 to 2 minutes. Add remaining dry
ingredients and stir into mixture. Add liquids and simmer on low heat covered for at least
1 hour, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Increase heat to medium and uncover
and continue to simmer an additional hour. Add additional liquids as needed achieve
desired consistency. Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary.
3. Serve with cheddar or jack cheese.

.40
That's a wonderful looking recipe. And again, in the interest of cultural diversity, though I'm not sure the recipe I'm posting has anything to do with culture, but rather just another great tasting chili variety, and specifically for G.C., I give you my own White Chili Recipe. People have given me high marks for this one.

2009 United Way Chili Cook-off, 1rst-place Prize-Winning Recipe, White Chili Category – Bob Flowers’ White Chili

In past years, I made this same basic recipe, but with chicken or pork as the meat, and with more potent hot peppers. So this year, I tweaked the herbs and spices, changed to ground beef, and reduced the heat. Everyone who has tried this recipe has fallen in love with it. It’s not as pretty as red chili, but it sure does taste great. Try this recipe on a cool fall night. It’ll warm you to your toes.

Ingredients:
* 24 oz. (3 cups) Great Northern Beans, cooked
* 24 oz. Pinto Beans, cooked
* ½ cup Salsa Verde (available in most grocery stores)
* 1 large white onion, diced
* ½ cup chopped green onion
* 1 tbs. Sriracha brand Pepper Sauce
* 2 tbs. Coriander, ground
* 1 tbs. Cumin, ground
* 2 stalks Celery, sliced with leaves
* 1 ½ lb. Ground Beef (80/20 grind)
* 2 tsp. Kosher Salt, or 1 ½ tsp. table salt
* 3 tbs. fresh Cilantro, chopped
* 2, one-inch Serrano Chile Peppers, minced
* ½ tsp. white pepper, ground (or you can use black pepper)
* 2 cups heavy cream (1 pint)
* ½ cup Masa Harina (can be found next to the corn meal at
your grocers)
* 3 tbs. cooking oil

Heat the oil in a large pan. Add the diced onion. Sauté over medium heat while stirring until the onion begins to soften (about 2 minutes). Add the ground beef and flatten out. Let cook for about 5 minutes and then break it up. Stir and cook until the meat has lightly browned. Add the remaining ingredients, except for the Masa Harina, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for two hours, stirring every twenty minutes or so to prevent the chili from sticking. Taste the chili and correct the seasoning to your taste (add more salt if needed).
Place the Masa Harina into an eight ounce cup along with just enough water to form a thick paste. Stir with a fork until all the lumps are removed. Slowly stir in two tbs. more water. This is called slurry. Stir the Masa Harina slurry into the chili, and again cover. Let it all cook over low heat for an additional ten minutes. Stir and test to see if the chili is thick enough for you. If so, then you are ready to serve up a bowl- full or two to your family. But remember, like all great chili, this is even better the next day. So if you can, cool it in an ice bath and place in the refrigerator for tomorrow’s dinner. Serve it with some good cornbread, or nachos.



I wrote this up for our Tribal Newspaper, and so that I could share it with others.



Now we have two of many great chili recipes from DC members. We want more!


Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-30-2013, 12:32 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post

That's a wonderful looking recipe. And again, in the interest of cultural diversity, though I'm not sure the recipe I'm posting has anything to do with culture, but rather just another great tasting chili variety, and specifically for G.C., I give you my own White Chili Recipe. People have given me high marks for this one.

2009 United Way Chili Cook-off, 1rst-place Prize-Winning Recipe, White Chili Category – Bob Flowers’ White Chili

In past years, I made this same basic recipe, but with chicken or pork as the meat, and with more potent hot peppers. So this year, I tweaked the herbs and spices, changed to ground beef, and reduced the heat. Everyone who has tried this recipe has fallen in love with it. It’s not as pretty as red chili, but it sure does taste great. Try this recipe on a cool fall night. It’ll warm you to your toes.

Ingredients:
* 24 oz. (3 cups) Great Northern Beans, cooked
* 24 oz. Pinto Beans, cooked
* ½ cup Salsa Verde (available in most grocery stores)
* 1 large white onion, diced
* ½ cup chopped green onion
* 1 tbs. Sriracha brand Pepper Sauce
* 2 tbs. Coriander, ground
* 1 tbs. Cumin, ground
* 2 stalks Celery, sliced with leaves
* 1 ½ lb. Ground Beef (80/20 grind)
* 2 tsp. Kosher Salt, or 1 ½ tsp. table salt
* 3 tbs. fresh Cilantro, chopped
* 2, one-inch Serrano Chile Peppers, minced
* ½ tsp. white pepper, ground (or you can use black pepper)
* 2 cups heavy cream (1 pint)
* ½ cup Masa Harina (can be found next to the corn meal at
your grocers)
* 3 tbs. cooking oil

Heat the oil in a large pan. Add the diced onion. Sauté over medium heat while stirring until the onion begins to soften (about 2 minutes). Add the ground beef and flatten out. Let cook for about 5 minutes and then break it up. Stir and cook until the meat has lightly browned. Add the remaining ingredients, except for the Masa Harina, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for two hours, stirring every twenty minutes or so to prevent the chili from sticking. Taste the chili and correct the seasoning to your taste (add more salt if needed).
Place the Masa Harina into an eight ounce cup along with just enough water to form a thick paste. Stir with a fork until all the lumps are removed. Slowly stir in two tbs. more water. This is called slurry. Stir the Masa Harina slurry into the chili, and again cover. Let it all cook over low heat for an additional ten minutes. Stir and test to see if the chili is thick enough for you. If so, then you are ready to serve up a bowl- full or two to your family. But remember, like all great chili, this is even better the next day. So if you can, cool it in an ice bath and place in the refrigerator for tomorrow’s dinner. Serve it with some good cornbread, or nachos.



I wrote this up for our Tribal Newspaper, and so that I could share it with others.



Now we have two of many great chili recipes from DC members. We want more!


Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Oh wow! I need to try both of these recipes,ty.
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Old 05-04-2013, 11:29 PM   #25
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I pretty much have liked every bowl of chili I have ever tasted, our family recipe being my favorite. The only I didn't like that I tried was one that was at a chili competition that tasted like the added a lot of salsa verde and it was overly spicy.
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Old 05-04-2013, 11:43 PM   #26
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ok, so don't be a badger. what's your family recipe.

welcome, btw, 1 o' 9.

are you related to 7 of 9?
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Old 05-04-2013, 11:53 PM   #27
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ok, so don't be a badger. what's your family recipe.

welcome, btw, 1 o' 9.

are you related to 7 of 9?
To be honest, I'm not exactly sure what our family recipe is. That's something I have to talk to my mom about. She usually doesn't really have an actual recipe for anything but I'm pretty sure this one of the only things she developed that she actually has a recipe for or, if she doesn't have one written down, you can easily point out the ingredient amounts and what she does to make it.

Also, and I apologize if this was a joke but, I'm not sure what you mean by 7 or 9?
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:07 AM   #28
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google 7 of 9.

sorry, a bit obscure.

welcome, nonetheless.
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:31 AM   #29
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Mild. And preferably at Mama Lupe's down in Aransas Pass, Texas.
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:28 AM   #30
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I do a very lazy woman's chili. A can of Bush's Chili Magic mild, another one of Texas medium, a scant pound of fried up ground beef and maybe kick in a few shakes of a chili powder I picked up in southern VT. I think that's pretty much it. Sometimes Himself gets diced onion if I feel like it (hate cutting up onions!) and we always have cheddar cheese in the house so there's that. As sides I like to pop the local Westminster Oyster crackers in between spoonfuls of chili. A cold mug of beer goes well if I spice it up just a tad too much!
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