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Old 12-09-2004, 06:45 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bangbang
I only paid about a buck a pound.

LOL... I should tell my husband that... I think he's spent about $40,000 if you include the new truck that he HAD to have since you can't throw a dead and bloody deer in the back seat of out Impala.... 4 years of buying hunting equipment and camo gear... but, no deer have been shot. That deer meat is going to be worth it's weight in gold if he ever brings one home. LOLOLOL! UGH!
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Old 12-09-2004, 06:56 PM   #32
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PDS thats funny! $40,000 huh? wow!
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Old 12-09-2004, 06:58 PM   #33
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In this particular instance there's no fight - I just have to find out how many pounds they had and what they can buy it for - yep, whatever it costs to replace it is what they are owed.
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Old 12-09-2004, 07:05 PM   #34
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Pds, why couldn't he just tie the deer to the top of the car? That's what everyone else around here does if they don't have a truck!
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Old 12-10-2004, 01:46 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by kitchenelf
In this particular instance there's no fight - I just have to find out how many pounds they had and what they can buy it for - yep, whatever it costs to replace it is what they are owed.
That goes back to where I got into this discussion ... how many pounds did they have? A "whole deer" isn't an answer ... any more than saying you had a whole fish. If they legally hunted it and got it processed, they will know how many pounds they got. Replacement cost ... buying at K-Mart or Neiman Marcus? For ground venison - figure about $5-$6 per pound.
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Old 12-10-2004, 02:03 AM   #36
 
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Being one who has paid a stunning price for each fishing "lure" that just doesn't dam well "work", as well as the licensing fees, let alone the costs of getting from here to there (let alone back again!)...let me state that the "process" was truly enjoyable..

If anyone wants to shoot deer, be aware in "NorthWestern Ontario" (this province is HUGE!) a "deer tag" enables a hunter to "take" up to seven animals, as the deer are carrying some sort of "bug" that is fatal to moose, and as a result, you "cannot find a moose", wheras deer are overrunning the cities and towns...

(You are also welcome to come and shoot off the pestilence of black bears, except in Spring, where our government "caved in" to the Sierra club some years back, and now we get "infested" with these "hungry" critters in cities, towns and campsites)

Eating "spring bear" from experience several years back...after they've used up most if not all the stored body fat, and"pigged out" on the "runing fish" in the streams and creeks, but "before" the blueberries and ants get into their diet, , its halfway between a good porkloin and a roast of beef, albeit without the fat that builds up the gravy...you have to sort of "steam" it...but a great taste, and a great "sandwich"...

I'm sure the bears would say much the same review on any of "us", were they given an opportunity...

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Old 12-10-2004, 06:05 AM   #37
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I'm sure the bears would say much the same review on any of "us", were they given an opportunity...Lifter
"Humans. The other wild life."
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Old 12-10-2004, 08:10 AM   #38
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On this subject, here's something interesting that came in the email today:

EMIGRANT, Mont.--Deercrash.com--run by the University of Wisconsin-Madison--is not recommended bedtime reading before a road trip over the river and through the woods to grandmother's house. But it is a reality check on a pullulating U.S. highway hazard. Deer-vehicle crashes in 2003 produced 367 human fatalities. Even for survivors, an encounter with a leaping stag takes a toll: The University of North Carolina's Highway Safety Research Center cites a 1995 study claiming that the property damage from such accidents that year was $1.2 billion.
Deer danger on U.S. highways is reaching epidemic proportions. Take Michigan: The state has an estimated 1.75 million white-tailed deer, and when mating season rolls around, they literally take to the streets. The costs, in life and property, prompted Gov. Jennifer Granholm to declare October "Michigan Car-Deer Crash Safety Awareness Month."
The omnivorous bear may appear a more threatening animal than the deer, but Bambi and his kind are statistically more dangerous to the average American. Lacking predators--if you don't count the automobile--adorable, big-eyed does have become a national menace. (Mind you, I'm not passing the buck: Males are a part of the problem too.)
Yet where there is crisis there is also opportunity. That's what New Zealand found when it turned to the market to solve its feral population explosion more than two decades ago. At a conference here hosted by the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC), based in nearby Bozeman, former New Zealand cabinet member Maurice McTigue described a uniquely Kiwi solution to too many deer chasing too few plants--what I like to call stagflation. Not only did the market solve the New Zealanders' problem, but the plan also created a whole new export industry.

God didn't put deer in New Zealand, but settlers decided he had erred. They imported a small number--perhaps as few as 50--some 100 years ago to add to the ambience. With nothing to eat them, the red deer and wapiti (elk) were soon breeding with each other and multiplying like mathematicians. It didn't take long for the government to brand these newcomers "noxious pests." For New Zealanders, Mr. McTigue says, the problem wasn't so much highway danger as the fact that the deer "were enormously destructive to the native forests."
Government culling programs sought to eradicate the deer on the grounds that they were not native. Yet the ubiquitous critters flourished as long as the sale of deer meat in New Zealand was illegal. Paradoxically, as Mr. McTigue explains, once commercial deer farming was legalized in the early 1980s, the unleashed animal spirits of entrepreneurs provided the solution: Aspiring deer farmers went out and captured the varmints in large numbers. One remarkable exploit related by Mr. McTigue was a "deer hunter" jumping from a helicopter onto the back of a wapiti mix, wrestling it to the ground and tying up its legs.
Yet how the herds were rounded up is not nearly as important as the fact that, by assigning value to them, businesses had an incentive to bring them in. Mr. McTigue holds that the deer-farming idea was the precursor to New Zealand's free-market revolution, the start of "thinking differently" about solutions to the country's problems.

There are still wild deer in New Zealand but farming has brought the populations under control. Concerns about disease outbreaks originating among the farmed deer and spreading to the wild deer have not been borne out. In fact tuberculosis, once a problem among wild deer, is nonexistent on farms.
Not only has forest vegetation been preserved by putting a price on deer but venison is a booming export industry, with New Zealand winning 40% of the world venison market. Remarkably, according to Mr. McTigue, Canada--a deer haven--gets three-quarters of its venison from New Zealand. He says the other amazingly lucrative market is antler racks, which currently fetch about $80 a pound in Asia, where they are ground up and used as aphrodisiacs. Hides are sent to Asia as well for tanning.
Americans provide New Zealand's second largest market for venison, after Europe. There have been some attempts to legalize deer farming in the U.S., but the regulations have been highly restrictive and limited; selling hunted-deer meat remains illegal. So while New Zealand sets market forces loose to rein in the stampede and create wealth, the U.S. leaves population control up to the American driver and forfeits, as road kill, a marketable and valuable resource.
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Old 12-10-2004, 09:29 AM   #39
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The cost of venison will vary in each situation. The cost I would think would include license, ammo, processing in an insusrance case. If the whole deer were to be made into venison sausage it would cost about $350.00 here. (Northern MN).I'm sure a recite would have to be produced also for the processing.Living here in the great north, we have alot of deer and the hunting is good. The average cost of processing a deer is $65.00 and then add the freezer paper cost,about $3.50.If made into burger the cost of ground pork has to be included about $1.99 a lb here.We do process our own deer as we get alot more venison doing it ourselves. Seems like when we use to get it processed we got a small amount of venison back. It's terrible how people will steal from you.Venison is great and the biggest mistake people make when they cook it , is to over cook it.There is northing like a great Venison and wild rice hot dish.
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Old 12-10-2004, 12:46 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DampCharcoal
Pds, why couldn't he just tie the deer to the top of the car? That's what everyone else around here does if they don't have a truck!
:D :D :D I'm sure he could have... but, he wanted that truck and well this was a good excuse. lol. We live in near Seattle Washington and I'm sure the "city folk" wouldn't like seeing Bambi tied to the roof of a passing car but, he could have done it. Neither of us thought of that though.
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