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Old 10-22-2006, 12:01 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
That's the answer to the problem. You need to know this to determine how much raw rice you need to yield the quantity of cooked rice in the problem.
I hear you Andy and I basically agree, but I still say that without knowing either the volume or weight ratio between dry and cooked rice, you can't solve this problem with the info given. If the rule of thumb everyone's using (twice the water to rice) has been taught to cookingSoul and it's understood that when the kids in this class are solving problems they're to use the information in the problems AND anything else they've learned at school, then I agree with you. Otherwise, seems there's something missing. CookingSoul, please let us know what your teacher has to say!
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Old 10-22-2006, 12:45 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
I hear you Andy and I basically agree, but I still say that without knowing either the volume or weight ratio between dry and cooked rice, you can't solve this problem with the info given. If the rule of thumb everyone's using (twice the water to rice) has been taught to cookingSoul and it's understood that when the kids in this class are solving problems they're to use the information in the problems AND anything else they've learned at school, then I agree with you. Otherwise, seems there's something missing. CookingSoul, please let us know what your teacher has to say!
That's what I've been saying! You must make an assumption to solve. If the chef has already taught the class on how to cook rice and gave them instructions on how much water to add and the yield info, then they could solve the problem. Since all DC members weren't in class, we had to make an assumption.

If you look back to my two solutuions, you'll see that I had to make a different solution for each attempt.
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Old 10-22-2006, 01:02 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
That's what I've been saying!
Sorry Andy, am I frustrating the living daylights out of you?! Methinks we're in agreement here.
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Old 10-22-2006, 01:43 PM   #34
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lol ya dont worry ill let you guys know im currently working on a study sheet for the test on teusday...soup test and definitions...consomee and the like even though i cant spell properly....
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Old 10-22-2006, 01:48 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
Sorry Andy, am I frustrating the living daylights out of you?! Methinks we're in agreement here.

Heck, no! My comment was just for emphasis, not arguement.
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Old 10-24-2006, 04:37 AM   #36
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I would try 5 pounds of rice, if u need 20 cooked cups of rice, for the recipe.
Hope i calculated that right. Rice doubles in size when cooked. Then u need 10 cups uncooked. 1 cup is approximately half pound.
10 cups of uncooked, is 5 pounds of rice and when this is cooked, it will double in size, and become 20 cups.
?!!!!!!

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Old 10-24-2006, 05:55 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
...But in a professional kitchen, you would still need to know how to figure out how much food you may need. For the most part, professional kitchens are run on the basis of weights--pastries/baking, for example--and have scales available. ...
my previous post was just to poke a little gentle fun at the fact that the problem as originally stated was a math problem about the correct amount to use when it was actually phrased with how much to buy.

it's true that a lot of cooking is done by ratios, both at home and in professional kitchens. on the other hand, there are ways of completely avoiding the need for many of them too. i'd say that as far as rice goes, two of the most common ways i've seen rice cooked in restaurants and hotels is:

plain white rice - a standard amount of rice that the restaurant expects to get them through a typical evening is simply added to a large stock pot of boiling water until the rice is cooked, then drained and allowed to sit for a few minutes before being placed into a bain marie.

pilaf style rice - the rice is cooked directly in the large rectangular bain marie pan to which diced onions, bell peppers, olive oil or whatever is also added. chicken stock is added to cover the rice. the pan is covered with aluminim foil and finished in an oven.

these methods have the advantage of a low risk of scorching as can happen when an exact amount of liquid to rice is used and cooked on the stove top until the liquid has all been absorbed. it happens from time to time that someone may get distracted, forget to reduce the heat, set a timer, etc. if the rice gets scorched, in the best case you may be able to use most of it, but in some cases the entire batch is wasted.

maybe these are considered "tricks of the trade". here's another for our young chef-to-be. if you ever do forget to set the timer after memorizing your formula, keep your ears peeled. in the large-sized stock pot you may be using, you don't want to grab a large wooden stirrer to try to see how much water is left in the bottom of the pot. this will close off all the little vents caused by the boiling water which allow the entire batch of rice to be steamed evenly. in a worst case, the top half of your batch won't be cooked thoroughly, while the bottom half becomes mushy. instead, listen to the bottom of the pot (without getting your ears burned). when you hear the rice start to crackle, the very bottom layer of grains will be starting to form a crispy crust. this is still way before it starts to burn. here in japan, people go crazy over that crispy part of rice, but in your kitchen, you'll only lose a serving spoon sized amount.
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Old 10-24-2006, 06:15 AM   #38
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boil in the bag rice.

Speaking of tips and tricks.
Have u ever tried boil in the bag rice? I used to always buy rice in big bags and cook some. Then one day somebody gave me the boil in the bags ones.
U put a bag in for the pot, for each person, and put as much water as u want, in the pot(covering the bags, of course). The rice bags only take in as much water as is needed, for that portion of rice. Then u take the bags out of the water. They have a tab on them, so u can hang them on a tap, to allow the water to drain out. And no rice gets stuck on the pot. And here, where i am this boil in the bag rice, only costs 1cent more per 100g, than the not in a bag one.

Mel
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Old 10-24-2006, 06:23 AM   #39
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The only brand that I've seen like that is the brand Success Rice.

I used to use that, but even though the rice came out looking perfectly cooked, it somwhow tasted watered down to me. So I went back to using Uncle Ben's Rice.


~Corey123.
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Old 10-24-2006, 09:57 AM   #40
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In my opinion, the easiest and safest way to boil rice is with a rice cooker. It comes in different sizes, with either a stainless steel or non-stick pot with measurements. The accessories include a plastic ladle and a measuring cup (slightly smaller than a coffee cup). To boil rice, all you need is measure it by using the cup - 1 cup of raw rice to water reaching the level marked 1 in the cooking pot, 2 cups to 2 and so forth. Once you press the 'cook' button, the cooking process will begin until the rice is done, at which time it will switch to 'warm' mode automatically until serving time. This baby is very useful when you have guests or parties. A very helpful appliance indeed for the homemakers.
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