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Old 08-04-2006, 10:58 PM   #1
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How to determine/decrease jalapeno spiciness?

I made a batch of jalapeno poppers the other day (jalapenos stuffed with cheese, breaded, then deep fried) and they were way too spicy. I thought most of the spiciness was in the seeds, which were carefully removed. I put the peppers under the broiler for a few minutes before seeding and stuffing them. I don't know if that would make any difference. Does anyone know what I should do differently? If there isn't anything, then is there a way to tell how spicy the peppers will be just by looking at them?

Thanks,
~K

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Old 08-04-2006, 11:20 PM   #2
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Taking out the seeds and the white ribs on the inside of the pepper will eliminate most of the heat. Unfortunately, the heat in jalapenos varies a lot these days, making it difficult to judge.
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Old 08-05-2006, 01:44 AM   #3
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No, you can't tell from looking at them. The level of heat will vary from pepper to pepper, plant to plant, and season to season (growing conditions).

Quote:
Originally Posted by k_young221
I put the peppers under the broiler for a few minutes before seeding and stuffing them.
Roasting them - especially before removing the seeds and membranes - can double or triple their heat. Basically ... roasting them causes steam inside that causes the capsaicin and other related chemicals to leech out of the seeds and membranes which are then absorbed into the flesh.

The next time - remove the seeds and ribs, skip the roasting process, and proceed with the stuffing, battering, and frying. They will still be plenty spicey ... just not so much so.
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Old 08-05-2006, 04:38 AM   #4
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My grandom suggested this, remove the seeds and dunk peppers in hot water for a couple of seconds.
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Old 08-05-2006, 08:22 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaheen
My grandom suggested this, remove the seeds and dunk peppers in hot water for a couple of seconds.
There's a common misconception about hot chili peppers. The seeds are not the hottest part; it's the vein in the middle ( called the placenta) which stores most of the capsaicin. The gland is at the top of the pepper.
In fact, the skin of the pepper holds more heat than the seeds, so removing the seeds doesn't really do much.
Jalapeños are notoriously fickle, heat-wise! I've had some which are incendiary, and others which taste like Spanish guindillas.
If you want to keep your poppers "cooler", make yourself a yoghurt or cream-based dipping sauce. Milk products work better than anything else for cooling down chili burn!
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Old 08-05-2006, 09:01 AM   #6
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When we grew Jalapenos it was amazing how the heat differed pepper to pepper on the same plant!!!
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Old 08-05-2006, 10:25 AM   #7
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cliveb is right on. The seeds actually do not contain any heat themselves. OK that is kind of a deceiving statement so let me explain.

The heat from a pepper comes from the white ribs and is concentrated at the top of the pepper. That just so happens to be where the seeds live. because of the seeds proximity to that heat concentration, the oils do rub off and coat the seeds. That is why removing the seeds will tend to cut the heat. To really get rid of a good amount of heat though, you want to remove the white parts.
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Old 08-05-2006, 02:27 PM   #8
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Wow, thanks a lot for all the responses. I definitely will NOT roast them next time! I will also be careful to remove the white parts as well as the seeds.

I kinda figured they were gonna be too spicy when, after roasting them a bit, my eyes started watering and I started coughing uncontrollably while de-seeding them! Sheesh.

~K
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Old 08-05-2006, 03:56 PM   #9
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What they said. My dad introduced me to hot peppers as far back as I can remember. We would sit at the table and try different peppers and hot sauces while drinking buttermilk and eating fresh italian bread. Weate the whole pepper....seeds and all. Many times the heat varied among the same peppers. My favorite is the habanero....what a rush.
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Old 08-05-2006, 09:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k_young221
Wow, thanks a lot for all the responses. I definitely will NOT roast them next time! I will also be careful to remove the white parts as well as the seeds.
~K
Hey, but don't abandon them.
It is a proven fact that the "heat-seeking" ingredient in Hot Peppers (capsaicin) also stimulates the endorphins in the brain. Endorphins remove pain and cause pleasure, which is why so many chiliheads say they get a "high" when eating hot peppers.
Well every looney to his thingy - you need slowly to increase your heat tolerance!!
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