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Old 02-17-2015, 11:03 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
It means toasting the flour. I think it's fussy and adds a slight taste to gravy that's not unpleasant but ... Made it taste different somehow.

I tried it once or twice but didn't see the benefit.
My sister taught me that method. I am with you Jenny. I didn't care for the gravy at all. Even though the flour was "cooked", it left me with a taste in my mouth that I didn't care for. I made it a couple of times more, and never again. I think the best tasting gravy is made with the slurry. Even though I spent a long time making sure the liquid absorbed the flour, it still tasted undone. When I lived down in Texas, I think I was the only one who didn't care for this method at all. And a few of my friends were surprised to learn that there was another way to make a good gravy. I think I made a few converts to the slurry method.
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Old 02-17-2015, 11:27 PM   #32
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My sister taught me that method. I am with you Jenny. I didn't care for the gravy at all. Even though the flour was "cooked", it left me with a taste in my mouth that I didn't care for. I made it a couple of times more, and never again. I think the best tasting gravy is made with the slurry. Even though I spent a long time making sure the liquid absorbed the flour, it still tasted undone. When I lived down in Texas, I think I was the only one who didn't care for this method at all. And a few of my friends were surprised to learn that there was another way to make a good gravy. I think I made a few converts to the slurry method.

I'm a roux girl but both are simple and easily made foolproof with practice!

I promise to try your slurry method next time. I used it many many years ago...
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Old 02-17-2015, 11:59 PM   #33
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I'm a roux girl but both are simple and easily made foolproof with practice!

I promise to try your slurry method next time. I used it many many years ago...
I put a glug of Gravy Master in the flour/water slurry. It colors the gravy and I think it also adds flavor. You also can see if all of the flour got mixed in. If you see white speckles, then shake some more. I have always had a jar just for gravy slurry. It doesn't go up on a high shelf, but right there in front and labeled "For Gravy Only!"
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Old 02-18-2015, 01:57 AM   #34
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My Mom would pour just a bit of black coffee into beef gravy. Boy, was it good that way! I don't do that because we never have coffee at supper. One of these days I have to remember to save a few ounces on a night I make a nice beef roast.
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Old 02-18-2015, 04:30 AM   #35
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My Mom would pour just a bit of black coffee into beef gravy. Boy, was it good that way! I don't do that because we never have coffee at supper. One of these days I have to remember to save a few ounces on a night I make a nice beef roast.
How about adding a little instant espresso powder!
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Old 02-18-2015, 12:13 PM   #36
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RB, put a drop or two of Gravy Master in your slurry before you shake it. You will see if you have any flour that has not blended in.
Kitchen Bouquet? Little bottle with yellow label? My ex MIL used it all the time. It looks like reduced Worcestershire sauce to me and smells like it too. I need to pick up a bottle next time I'm in the store.

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Another hint is to add the slurry slowly, whisking as you pour to thoroughly mix it into your broth.
Yes, that would be a requirement I must assume.

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A slurry using potato starch and liquid.
I have in a pinch used corn starch mixed with cold water.
But I do not like the sheen it gives the gravy.

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My Mom would pour just a bit of black coffee into beef gravy. Boy, was it good that way! I don't do that because we never have coffee at supper. One of these days I have to remember to save a few ounces on a night I make a nice beef roast.
My parents never threw away coffee. Especially espresso. My dad would save it in a little jar and reuse it as needed.
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