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Old 01-02-2015, 08:03 PM   #1
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How to: Gravy from Pot Roast?

So I want to know if there is a way to use all the excess liquid from the pot roast I made and if so, then how to do so.

I made pot roast with a 3lb chuck, mirepoix, potatoes, and 2 cups of beef broth.

There was a lot of liquid leftover and it was soupy. I was wondering how I could utilize that and make a thicker sauce/gravy

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Old 01-02-2015, 08:15 PM   #2
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So I want to know if there is a way to use all the excess liquid from the pot roast I made and if so, then how to do so.

I made pot roast with a 3lb chuck, mirepoix, potatoes, and 2 cups of beef broth.

There was a lot of liquid leftover and it was soupy. I was wondering how I could utilize that and make a thicker sauce/gravy

Thicken it with flour and you have gravy. If you want, take out the meat and veggies then boil the liquid to reduce its volume and concentrate its flavors. Then thicken it with flour.
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Old 01-02-2015, 08:19 PM   #3
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Thicken it with flour and you have gravy. If you want, take out the meat and veggies then boil the liquid to reduce its volume and concentrate its flavors. Then thicken it with flour.
so use a chinois? then reduce it for how long? is the reducing process just bringing out flavor and minimizing the amount of total starting liquid?

and do I add the flour to the liquid, or flour in a seperate pan then add the liquid?
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Old 01-02-2015, 08:58 PM   #4
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Remove the roast / veggies to a a platter and tent with foil.


I don't think you need chinois. You need to use a whisk or a wooden spoon.

I think if you simply reduce the drippings you will achieve a flavorful concentrated and possibly a thinner style pan sauce. Very tasty but may not provide the volume you may want.

If you want gravy, estimate how much you want -- 1 C, 2 cups - 4 cups if it's a big roast or you are serving many people etc.

Eyeball about how much of the drippings is fat vs cooking liquids and meat juices. I'm not very accurate about doing this, and to pour all the liquid into a container and cool it, takes too long. Sooooo...

what I do, if I want a moderately thick gravy is put 2 or so Tbs flour in a pint jar, add about a half cup water to it and shake it covered until it is mixed. Then pour this slowly into the pan while stirring continuously until the slurry is dissolver and there are no lumps. Boil and stir one to two minutes to cook away the flour-y flavor. Simmer another 2-5 minutes or so. Taste for salt/pepper. Add more liquid if it got too thick or simmer to reduce if it's too thin.

You can add a blurp of wine or broth when making gravy if there was not enough liquid in the pan to start with. Just stir up the brown bits in the pan and go from there.
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Old 01-02-2015, 09:35 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
Remove the roast / veggies to a a platter and tent with foil.


I don't think you need chinois. You need to use a whisk or a wooden spoon.

I think if you simply reduce the drippings you will achieve a flavorful concentrated and possibly a thinner style pan sauce. Very tasty but may not provide the volume you may want.

If you want gravy, estimate how much you want -- 1 C, 2 cups - 4 cups if it's a big roast or you are serving many people etc.

Eyeball about how much of the drippings is fat vs cooking liquids and meat juices. I'm not very accurate about doing this, and to pour all the liquid into a container and cool it, takes too long. Sooooo...

what I do, if I want a moderately thick gravy is put 2 or so Tbs flour in a pint jar, add about a half cup water to it and shake it covered until it is mixed. Then pour this slowly into the pan while stirring continuously until the slurry is dissolver and there are no lumps. Boil and stir one to two minutes to cook away the flour-y flavor. Simmer another 2-5 minutes or so. Taste for salt/pepper. Add more liquid if it got too thick or simmer to reduce if it's too thin.

You can add a blurp of wine or broth when making gravy if there was not enough liquid in the pan to start with. Just stir up the brown bits in the pan and go from there.
This is the way my mom taught me to do it. Just be sure that you shake up the flour and water slurry very well, and whisk vigorously while pouring it into the broth to avoid any lumps.
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Old 01-02-2015, 09:35 PM   #6
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If the vegetables were cooked with the roast the entire time, they've pretty much given up their flavor, imo. Now you can use them, minus the potatoes, to make the gravy. Just remove the roast and potatoes from the pan, place the liquid and remaining vegetables in the blender, and purée it. Taste and adjust seasonings and consistency, if necessary, by finishing up in a saucepan.
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Old 01-03-2015, 08:31 AM   #7
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You could add some beurre manie to thicken your reduced sauce. It will also add extra richness from the butter.
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Old 01-03-2015, 10:08 AM   #8
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If the vegetables were cooked with the roast the entire time, they've pretty much given up their flavor, imo...
When I make a pot roast, after about 2.5-3.0 hours, I remove the meat and strain the liquid that contains mirepoix veggies, tomato etc. I press the liquid through a strainer and discard the solids.

The strained liquid goes back into the pot with the meat to finish cooking. When the timing is right, I add the carrots, onions, mushrooms peas, etc. that will be served with the meat. No potatoes. I make mashed potatoes separately to go with the rest.

I then thicken the liquid with a little flour and we're ready to go.
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Old 01-03-2015, 10:59 AM   #9
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If the vegetables were cooked with the roast the entire time, they've pretty much given up their flavor, imo. Now you can use them, minus the potatoes, to make the gravy. Just remove the roast and potatoes from the pan, place the liquid and remaining vegetables in the blender, and purée it. Taste and adjust seasonings and consistency, if necessary, by finishing up in a saucepan.
This works, although I'm not a big fan of it for gravy, because it makes the sauce texture a little bit more coarse (no matter how well it's pureed, there are still fine particles of vegetable matter - at least that has been my experience with it). I like smooth gravy when that's what I'm making, and thickening with flour works for me. Just personal preference. The beurre manie that Craig suggests also sounds quite yummy.

Of course if there is a dietary reason for avoiding flour, then that makes a difference.
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Old 01-03-2015, 12:47 PM   #10
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Of course, both work, and I used flour as well. Depends on what I'm making and what I feel like doing. I just thought I'd put another suggestion out there
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