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Old 04-07-2014, 08:32 AM   #11
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I wasn't going to get involved with the 'coddled' egg discussion only because that wasn't really what you were asking but, yes, egg coddlers are wonderful and I love cooking them in my old ones. Have you tried to find any on Ebay? might be worth a look?? Now, just to raise a few eyebrows ( am I going to regret this? ) I cook my 'boiled' eggs like this. I put them (with shells on of course), in my electric kettle. Yes, you have read that right. Add enough cold water to cover and switch on. As the water boils, the kettle switches off and I then time for 6 minutes. They come out perfect and believe it or not it helps to get rid of any scale build up in the kettle.
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Old 04-07-2014, 09:12 AM   #12
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Ha! Now we're getting there. Thanks Silversage for your thin/thick white explanation. That all makes sense. You might have solved the problem because, being a European, I don't (strictly, my wife doesn't) store eggs in a 'fridge. They sit on the worktop in the kitchen even though I see that there is a place in the 'fridge to place eggs. Maybe I'll put eggs for poaching in the bespoke place in the 'fridge and leave the rest outside? Thanks again to all of you who have responded to my request for help. I'll let you know how I get on.

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Old 04-07-2014, 12:03 PM   #13
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I too have misplaced my egg coddlers...I keep imagining that they must be in one of those many boxes somewhere...

I eat 2 poached eggs almost every day. The eggs are as fresh as they come (still warm from the hen). The fresher the egg, the more the white adheres to the yolk. I use warm eggs. I don't store eggs in the fridge until after I wash them (once the bloom is removed). I read once that eggs 0-48 hours old are the best for poaching...I don't think the temp of the egg matters. The freshness most definitely does.
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Old 04-07-2014, 02:12 PM   #14
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I have a mantra . . . the best solution to a problem is not to create it.

methinks you've nailed the problem - the egg volume is too much for the cup size, the white overflows into the water below.
the older the egg, the less viscous the white - if it gets real thin, certainly isn't going to help the situation. super fresh the white may be cohesive enough to 'rise up' by capillary action over the 'rim' of the cup and 'stay put'

so...to the question of how to stop the foaming....
not had the problem, but some quick surfing sez: a couple drops of oil in the water.

the vinegar trick may work - if the pan / cup insert is aluminum, the acid will discolor it; too much acid / long term may result in etching/pitting.....

acids have the same effect as heat on proteins - only the protein strands are 'de-natured' chemically. this is the basis behind vinegar in the water.

for "true poaching" - the acid causes the white to contract/shrivel up/congeal 'immediately' - so the white does not string out in the poaching water.

silicone compounds are also used to impede foaming; seems a bit much for the home kitchen, tho....

when I have a crowd to feed, I use a large, deep fry pan with water brought to a soft simmer, heat proof clear glass bowls (which double for mise en place) spray lightly with vegetable oil, crack the egg into the glass bowl, float in the simmering water. I have a sufficient number of glass bowls I can pump out a decent "production quantity" with little disruption.

the beauty of the bowls in your case is: they'll take a big egg!
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Old 04-08-2014, 11:54 AM   #15
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Thanks to all who have contributed. I now know the cause of the problem; I have several solutions to try; and I have several alternative ways of poaching eggs, including the larger duck eggs. Life is potentially wonderful again. A-poaching I will go. Thanks again.

Ben
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Old 04-08-2014, 01:29 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by menumaker View Post
believe it or not it helps to get rid of any scale build up in the kettle.
I find it curious. Aren't egg shells calcium? Isn't scale also caused by calcium?

Or am I misguided?
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Old 04-08-2014, 03:50 PM   #17
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Quote:
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I find it curious. Aren't egg shells calcium? Isn't scale also caused by calcium?

Or am I misguided?
I was wondering the same thing.
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Old 04-08-2014, 03:56 PM   #18
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If you decide to store eggs in the fridge, be sure to store them in the carton. Otherwise they can start to dry out and to absorb odours from other food the fridge.
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Old 04-08-2014, 04:17 PM   #19
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I am with Mad Cook. I have several custard cups and when I have several folks who want poached eggs, I drop the eggs into well butter-greased custard cups and put the cups into barely simmering water. I have a SS 12" sauté pan and can fit several cups in it all at the same time. The cups are big enough to hold even a jumbo egg. Which is about the same size as a duck egg.

Any egg like most protein foods need gentle heat. Don't bring the water to a full boil and then lower to a simmer. You only want to see tiny bubbles sitting on the bottom of the pan. Bring the water to "just" a bare simmer. Then place the custard cups in the water. Use enough water so that it comes half way up the custard cup. You will still have your eggs poached the way you like to do them, but without all that miserable foaming. It may take a bit longer for them to completely cook through. But if you can, place a cover on them as in Mad Cook's pan. But watch the heat and bubbles so that they don't break through the top of the water. You may need to turn the heat down even lower. If the custard cups protrude above the top of the pan, then use a piece of foil to cover them. Or just place the pan lid on the edges of the cups.

If you don't have any custard cups on hand, then measure one egg in a measuring cup to determine how many ounces it is. Then when and if you decide to purchase some custard cups, you will know just how big you need to have them. Does this answer your question?

Good luck.
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Old 04-08-2014, 04:20 PM   #20
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If you decide to store eggs in the fridge, be sure to store them in the carton. Otherwise they can start to dry out and to absorb odours from other food the fridge.
Excellent advice TL. Don't store them on the shelf on the door. Worst place for eggs.
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