"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-08-2014, 04:30 PM   #21
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 511
I so dislike being the village idiot - way too many people point that out to me....right regular.

but, can someone explain why the air sac in an egg keeps getting bigger while the egg is absorbing odors from the refrigerator?

like comma the air sac getting bigger means that there is a constant consistent continued exodus of "vapours" from the egg.

with all that exiting the egg, how does the refrigerator odor get into the egg?
do the bad odors wait for the defrost cycle to 'enter the egg'?

oh, and should anyone think that a paper / EPS egg carton is any kind of air / moisture / odor barrier..... not really. sorry about that.
__________________

__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 04:53 PM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
I so dislike being the village idiot - way too many people point that out to me....right regular.

but, can someone explain why the air sac in an egg keeps getting bigger while the egg is absorbing odors from the refrigerator?

like comma the air sac getting bigger means that there is a constant consistent continued exodus of "vapours" from the egg.

with all that exiting the egg, how does the refrigerator odor get into the egg?
do the bad odors wait for the defrost cycle to 'enter the egg'?

oh, and should anyone think that a paper / EPS egg carton is any kind of air / moisture / odor barrier..... not really. sorry about that.
The egg shell is porous. So as you know part of the white of the egg consists partly of water. That water evaporates through the shell that is porous. Odors go through those pores and water evaporates through them in the opposite direction.

Put a warm head of cooked cabbage or cauliflower in the fridge and see what your eggs taste like after sitting on the shelf out of the carton. The carton is better protection than none at all. A lot of folks will purchase a plastic container meant for eggs and transfer their eggs to that. Tupperware sells them. And you can also find them on eBay. Or if your grocery store sells eggs in one of those clear plastic egg cartons, buy a dozen, and hang onto the empty carton to refill it with your regular eggs.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 04:55 PM   #23
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,025
And you are not the Village Idiot. Not is this village anyhow. We don't have idiots. Just nice people.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 05:23 PM   #24
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 511
thanks Addie,

but there's a couple of issues.

the initial egg volume loss is carbon dioxide.
the next volume loss is water vapor.

the CO2 and the H2O are in a constant stream "out of the egg"

the suggestion that odors - much bigger molecules than CO2 and H2O some how move in the opposite direction just does not work with real science.

I was the Technical Services Director for a (then) large corporation selling packaging products to what shall be an un-named very large company - started with P and G - who had the rather nasty habit of checking all their supplier claims. I guess I may have an unfair advantage to understanding how various 'vapours' move around the world and through various materials.

that a paper/EPS/thermoformed plastic egg carton per the typical design is a "barrier" to any kind of moisture / gas loss / gain inside a refrigerator is, sorry - but put bluntly/truthfully - quite contradictory to the real world.

>>Put a warm head of cooked cabbage or cauliflower in the fridge
neither is out-gassing.
__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 05:32 PM   #25
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
And you are not the Village Idiot. Not is this village anyhow. We don't have idiots. Just nice people.
+1
I'm the village idiot. Just ask my boss. In reality, I do have an answer for you.

As Addie said, egg whites contain a fair amount of water. Steam will not go through the egg shell, but water vapor will (think GoreTex). As the vapor exits the egg, probably due to osmotic pressure, a vacuum is formed that draws in air and any odor molecules small enough to pass through the pores. This is why the bubble forms, and enlarges over time, and the eggs absorb other flavors.

As for the paper carton, it helps, but as you said, won't seal the eggs completely against odors. But then, neither will plastic. We used plastic shells to contain lead-acid batteries that we sold to customers. We used plastic because the outgassed hydrogen from the batteries, if contained by a metal enclosure, created an explosion hazard. The hydrogen molecules though, were small enough to pass through the plastic shell, nearly unimpeded, eliminating hydrogen buildup.

So yes, paper cartons help. Plastic helps more. But the best way to keep your eggs from gaining unwanted flavors is to use them up within a week or so after purchase.

Hope that helps.

Now, I think I'll go home, make mistakes while creating Easter goodies, and be the village idiot. And remember, when people think you're the village idiot, they expect less of you, and you can get more of what you want to do done.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 05:39 PM   #26
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
In our fridge we have an egg tray, not covered, just a tray. Our eggs are fine.

Not that I make it a habit of having foul smelling things in the fridge. But there are times that something does have a strong smell, like cabbage, and we never have any issues with the taste of the egg.
__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 05:53 PM   #27
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 511
>> As the vapor exits the egg, probably due to osmotic pressure, a vacuum is formed that draws in air and any odor molecules small enough to pass through the pores. This is why the bubble forms

aaaahhhhh, hold on a sec.

the VI wants to know, why is a really fresh egg white cloudy? why does a really fresh egg white become "clear" with age?

the egg has a yolk, the egg has a white, there is a membrane between the white bit and the shell.

so the theory is "something" inside the yolk/white "exits" - to "exit" that "something" has to pass through the membrane.

the air sac forms between the membrane and the shell. if proof is required, go peel an egg.

the "something" - having exited the yolk/white and passed through the membrane, must now "exit" the actual shell faster than something else on the 'outside pushing in' to create the 'vacuum' into which odors are drawn.

do I got this right?
__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 08:14 AM   #28
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I believe you've got it. I would suspect that the membrane that is against the shell is a semi-permeable membrane, like that membrane that separates the intestinal tract from the blood vessels that absorb nutrients from the gut.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 08:38 AM   #29
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,281
I thought I was the Village Idiot...maybe maybe demoted to Court jester...
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 11:12 AM   #30
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,874
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I honestly don't know if eggs can absorb fridge odours. I read it on a egg site. I leave my eggs in the carton, whether it's cardboard or plastic. I use the egg tray in the fridge for hard boiled eggs.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
egg, how to, water

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.