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Old 04-09-2014, 01:37 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
I thought I was the Village Idiot...maybe maybe demoted to Court jester...
They don't allow ogres and ogress's into villages, idiot or not. Europeans were funny that way. But villager, or just a humble ogress on the outskirts of the village, you are no idiot. Indeed, you are a princess, though in Europe, with all the marying withing the same bloodlines, that was no garuntee of quality either.

Fortunatly, we know you, and I suspect their are no inter-family marriages among ogers. You are no idiot, any way you look at it. Though you may be right about being a jester. What am I saying! I know that you are a jester.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-09-2014, 01:43 PM   #32
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>>if eggs can absorb fridge odours.
likely falls into the "ye olde kitchen" tales.

quite some years ago when I started researching the "truths" to such things, I found a web site that 'documented' how much water was 'lost' while eggs were stored in the home fridge. regrets, didn't "save" that site - but it was a .edu type non-egg industry thing.

misc background you may not wish to know about:
the initial "air sac" in a egg is created when the egg "cools down" from the hen's body temperature. it is created at the "big end" because - do not shoot the messenger - the shell is weaker / more porous at the big end.

the shell and membranes (there's more than one, technically....) are "permeable" - this is really quite an absolute requirement for a fertilized egg to grow a chick. it's a animal, it needs oxygen and it needs to get rid of carbon dioxide. as a chick develops inside the egg the "air sac" gets bigger and bigger, because . . . drum roll & rim shot . . . the developing chick uses up the volume of yolk & white inside the egg creating a 'vacuum'

this is only important if you are hatching chickens inside your refrigerator - which, temperature wise, is not going to happen comma anyway.

so, back to the question at hand.... the rate of moisture loss from an egg stored under refrigeration is quite small. sorry, don't remember the data - because - to result in any significant moisture loss required months of home fridge storage and to be perfectly blunt I do not keep eggs for months in my fridge - so it was of 'not really any interest' and I didn't "store" the info in my head.

I also store eggs in their (in my case pulped paper) carton. the dozen carton fits / slides quite nicely into the "wine bottle rack" of my fridge.....
all the pulped / EPS / clear plastic "dozen containers" I've seen on the market have these gigantic holes - they are not designed to 'contain / exclude' anything.

so the only way an egg is going to "suck up" bad odors (odor molecules are 50-10,000 times the size of oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide/etc) is for the egg to lose so much moisture those huge odors are driven to 'penetrate' the membrane(s).
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Old 04-09-2014, 01:50 PM   #33
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Thanks to all of the above who have replied. I have a few follow-on comments, and a question.

First, I have tried reducing the boil rate of the water once the foam starts to appear but to no avail. Once the albumen is in the water, thatís it. No amount of fiddling with the gas flow works. The only thing to do is curse and throw the eggs and water away and start again.

Second, I am partial to poached duck eggs. They are larger than chicken eggs, as pointed out by Chief Longwind and MenuMaker, and they are often the cause of the problem because the poacher pots are not designed for anything over a standard size egg. Now I eat my duck eggs boiled, not poached!

Third, I am a Brit living in the UK. (I need to work out how to add UK after Fareham in my profile.) My wife and I used to own a 16th century farmhouse and we populated the house with ancient things including a couple of Victorian egg coddlers. Egg coddlers are not ramekins. An egg coddler is a small china pot with a metal screw top lid. The egg is broken into the pot; the lid is screwed down, tight; and the whole kit and caboodle is fully immersed in rolling boiling water for around 7 or 8 minutes. The coddled egg, when ready, is superb.

When we moved from the farm, we either gave or threw away the coddlers. I regret that now. A coddler would have taken a full size duck egg. Iíve not worked out how to insert an image in these replies but if you google Royal Worcester Egg Coddlers and switch to Images you will see what Iím talking about. We owned the Victorian equivalent of the coddlers with cherries on, called Evesham.

Fourth, thanks for all the alternative methods of poaching/coddling/oeufs-en-cocotting the eggs. I will try some of the techniques.

Last, I appreciate the answers you have all given me but nobody has yet answered my question Ė what can I put in the water to stop the foaming once the albumen has entered it?

Ben
I'm a Brit in the UK too and I was always taught that duck eggs should only be eaten hard-boiled or baked in cakes. Something to do with the ducks swimming and feeding in polluted water.

I own two of the Royal Worcester china coddlers which were Christmas presents some years ago. Never used them but they are there if want them.

I suppose you could try vinegar in the water.. It's used to try and coagulate the egg white when you poach eggs directly in a pan of water. I don't find it works but other people swear by it. It might solve your problem.
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Old 04-09-2014, 02:01 PM   #34
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I honestly don't know if eggs can absorb fridge odours. I read it on a egg site. I leave my eggs in the carton, whether it's cardboard or plastic. I use the egg tray in the fridge for hard boiled eggs.
Generations of French cooks have put a truffle in a paper bag with raw eggs in shell in order to flavour the eggs. I've never been given a truffle so can't validate this but Elizabeth David cites it in one of her books and says it works.

I have to say that I rarely store raw eggs in the 'fridge. I don't think it does them any good. Perhaps if you are in an area with vey high summer temps you might need to but that doesn't often apply over here.
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Old 04-09-2014, 07:10 PM   #35
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I'm a Brit in the UK too and I was always taught that duck eggs should only be eaten hard-boiled or baked in cakes. Something to do with the ducks swimming and feeding in polluted water.
safefood | Storing food safely | Fridges
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