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Old 08-08-2008, 05:12 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by redmike
At age 63
We probably went to school together, gward doesn't this age sneak up on you the hit you with a sledge hammer.
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Old 08-08-2008, 06:59 PM   #12
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I also agree with the boiling first way. I have been doing wings, thighs and drumsticks that way for years...So long I can't remember. As Attie suggests, I also deep fry.

If you don't want to boil first, then you can deep fry from raw. Turn the heat down to no more than 150c (not sure what that is in F). Having the temp nice and low allows the chicken to cook all the way through without burning the outside. It will take 15 to 20 minutes at 150c.

I also agree on the fat levels. I think you only need to worry about it when you use a coating such as crumb or batter. I actually saw a cook deep fry a whole chicken once. I was just passing the kitchen and dropped in to say hi. He had extra people in for dinner and not enough food up. So he took a chicken and steamed it in the convy oven for 15 minutes. Then straight into the deep fryer for 5 minutes...Then served it as roast chicken.

If you prefer to boil first (which I do) then keep the water because it is now stock! It will keep in the fridge for a few weeks or you can freeze it. It will have very little flavour which means you can use it almost anywhere that water is called for.

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Old 08-09-2008, 10:22 AM   #13
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I also agree with the boiling first way. I have been doing wings, thighs and drumsticks that way for years...So long I can't remember. As Attie suggests, I also deep fry.

If you don't want to boil first, then you can deep fry from raw. Turn the heat down to no more than 150c (not sure what that is in F). Having the temp nice and low allows the chicken to cook all the way through without burning the outside. It will take 15 to 20 minutes at 150c.

I also agree on the fat levels. I think you only need to worry about it when you use a coating such as crumb or batter. I actually saw a cook deep fry a whole chicken once. I was just passing the kitchen and dropped in to say hi. He had extra people in for dinner and not enough food up. So he took a chicken and steamed it in the convy oven for 15 minutes. Then straight into the deep fryer for 5 minutes...Then served it as roast chicken.


If you prefer to boil first (which I do) then keep the water because it is now stock! It will keep in the fridge for a few weeks or you can freeze it. It will have very little flavour which means you can use it almost anywhere that water is called for.


What brand of deep fryer do you have? Also, is deep frying considered not healthy? I have been already told not to get barbeque grill as they think type of cooking is not healthy. Personally, I love barbeque but others here deny me unhealthy things! I have always considered today not long term. I do eat ice cream the REAL kind when they aren't around.
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Old 08-09-2008, 06:56 PM   #14
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What brand of deep fryer do you have? Also, is deep frying considered not healthy? I have been already told not to get barbeque grill as they think type of cooking is not healthy. Personally, I love barbeque but others here deny me unhealthy things! I have always considered today not long term. I do eat ice cream the REAL kind when they aren't around.
It's a Sunbeam, cafe series, model DF7700.

I don't think so...I think what is unhealthy, is eating 10 times more food than what is needed and spending the whole day playing computer games and watching TV...That is why we have fat kids!

My personal belief is that there is no such thing as unhealthy food...There is only unhealthy eating.

If you use vegetable fat for your deep fryer it is better. You should consider what you are eating and how often. If you have an active lifestyle, then having deep fried food 1 to 3 times a week should be fine.

BUT, BUT, BUT...Batter the food or bread crumb the food and then you should not have it more than once every 2 weeks, unless you are very active. Or, remove the batter or crumbs. In fact, some foods can be much more healthy if battered and deep fried...For example, battered fish. Batter and deep fry the fish, then remove the batter before serving. If done properly the batter will seal in all the flavour and nutrients.

So I think it really depends on what your over all diet and lifestyle is like, rather than a particular style of cooking being unhealthy for you.

I cannot imagine why someone would say that a BBQ grill is unhealthy. I would suggest that a grill would be healthy enough for every day cooking.

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Old 08-15-2008, 07:19 AM   #15
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It's your technique.

Let the chicken come to room temp, about 10-15 minutes before cooking. Lower the heat on your stove to medium after the pan has warmed up. To achieve moister white meat, add a little liquid or broth to the pan and cover after it has been browned on all sides. The liquid and cover provide a bigger window for doneness so you don't wind up with dry or raw meat.
This is a really great method, I think I might try it myself, no harm in trying to make my food taste even better ;)
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Old 08-23-2008, 03:46 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
It's your technique.

Let the chicken come to room temp, about 10-15 minutes before cooking. Lower the heat on your stove to medium after the pan has warmed up. To achieve moister white meat, add a little liquid or broth to the pan and cover after it has been browned on all sides. The liquid and cover provide a bigger window for doneness so you don't wind up with dry or raw meat.
I tried the above and got excellent results.

I couldn't try Attie's idea because I don't have a deep fry.

Thanks to everyone for the pointers.

Mike
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Old 08-24-2008, 11:16 AM   #17
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Redmike
I have the same problem especially when cooking chopped tomatoes, afterwards there are loads of red spots all over the hob! Net is a good idea but i havent seen anything else!
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Old 08-24-2008, 01:26 PM   #18
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Pacanis, KissTC & bowlingshirt - thanks for your replies.

I lived in Brazil for a year and they are masters of barbecuing and they always boil thighs for 10-15 minutes after having added garlic and coriander to the water or other herbs or spices. That way, they brown and crisp the outsides on the barbecue and never have to worry about the inside being raw.

Mike
Mikey,

How spectacular of you, you've answered your own question! I've always simmered my chicken parts first (10-15 minutes seems much) and sauteed them second. Never fails to produce satisfactory results, and without a mess.
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Old 09-02-2008, 09:52 PM   #19
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Mikey,

How spectacular of you, you've answered your own question! I've always simmered my chicken parts first (10-15 minutes seems much) and sauteed them second. Never fails to produce satisfactory results, and without a mess.
Am I wrong in thinking that you would lose a lot of flavor by boiling or simmering the chicken in water before frying or roasting it?

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Old 09-03-2008, 10:12 AM   #20
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Am I wrong in thinking that you would lose a lot of flavor by boiling or simmering the chicken in water before frying or roasting it?

Sedagive
On the contrary, you will be delighted to find the flavor enhanced twofold — trust me.
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