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Old 07-10-2014, 12:36 PM   #21
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Roll_Bones, I've had numerous friends tell me that I stink LOL! I could be standing 10 feet away from them and they would still be dying from the stench. And of course I can't eat raw garlic when working, because everyone in the office complains

However, with the boiled garlic, I don't really have a problem. I can eat 10+ without having as strong of the garlic-y smell. I just mash 'em and eat them!
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Old 07-10-2014, 12:56 PM   #22
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If I ate raw garlic at that rate I wouldn't get out the rest -room for a week!! But that is between me and my digestive system. However, it is really good for all kinds of reasons, so enjoy but I suggest that 'all things in moderation' is a good rule of thumb in this case perhaps except for the odd occasion such as Chicken with 40 cloves and that is wonderful?
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Old 07-10-2014, 04:54 PM   #23
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Personally unless you are on the dating circuit, who cares about garlic smell?
I love the stuff and pay little if any attention this perceived problem.

Has anyone told you they smell garlic on you? I may smell like garlic (i hope not) but no one ever mentioned it including my close family.
My wife would tell me if there was an issue.

So, whats the real issue. Love of garlic or concern about others perception of you?
The answer is to choose your friends and partners from the garlic-loving community.
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Old 07-11-2014, 11:25 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by proverbs View Post
Roll_Bones, I've had numerous friends tell me that I stink LOL! I could be standing 10 feet away from them and they would still be dying from the stench. And of course I can't eat raw garlic when working, because everyone in the office complains

However, with the boiled garlic, I don't really have a problem. I can eat 10+ without having as strong of the garlic-y smell. I just mash 'em and eat them!
I see. Sorry to hear that. I have never had boiled garlic. I roast garlic all the time though.
It has to taste much better than boiled garlic.

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The answer is to choose your friends and partners from the garlic-loving community.
Hear Hear!
I have a personal story concerning garlic and those not so familiar with garlic.
I'm in SC and my wife is from here. So my wifes family are all southerners and my MIL had never seen a garlic bulb until she moved here. In with us.

Garlic was some mysterious, devilish ingredient that only non - Americans ate in far away lands.
They never associated garlic bread or any other Italian foods with garlic either. I had a co-worker think that the oil and vinegar at Subway somehow think it was "garlics" as he called it.
"we don't eat garlics" were his words.

One Christmas I made a flat bread with onion and garlic topped with Parmesan. I used lots of fresh garlic. No one complained, but I did get several inquisitions as to how it was prepared.
To this very day, people i may have met once or twice in my life bring up this bread.
They must have been talking all these years about that bread and how "garlicky" it was.

I guess/hope the garlic mystery is solved for them or they hate it even more. Not because they don't like the taste, but because in these parts people just don't use garlic. And those that do eat and appreciate garlic are from other lands.
Just my take.
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Old 07-11-2014, 12:01 PM   #25
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...in these parts people just don't use garlic. And those that do eat and appreciate garlic are from other lands.
Forgive me for saying so, but that's the most outlandish thing I've ever heard. I've lived in both Florida and Texas (which some may say is not part of the south, but that's hogwash. It's about as far south in the US as one can go). I have many friends who live in southern states, and have eaten at their homes numerous times. I don't know of any that don't use garlic, at least occasionally. How would you make Cajun/Creole cuisine without garlic? Or shrimp and grits? Or Tex-Mex? Or even pizza? The list goes on.

There's even an annual Garlic Fest in Delray Beach, Florida
http://dbgarlicfest.com/

Anyone who isn't at least familiar with garlic - and I don't care where they live - probably needs to get out more. But I sure wouldn't lump everyone in an entire region into that category.
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Old 07-11-2014, 12:40 PM   #26
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With all the chefs on television, food forums such as DC, published recipes in any language, garlic festivals and many other references, I don't think there is anyone of this earth who hasn't heard of garlic, except maybe the hermit that no one has seen for eons. It is no longer considered just an Italian or Mediterranean secret seasoning. When the Italians first started to immigrate to this country at the turn of the 20th century, one of their foods that they grew because they couldn't find them in the stores was tomatoes. The rest of America found out all the great things you can do with them. Like garlic, they no longer are just an Italian oddity.
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Old 07-11-2014, 12:56 PM   #27
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Forgive me for saying so, but that's the most outlandish thing I've ever heard. I've lived in both Florida and Texas (which some may say is not part of the south, but that's hogwash. It's about as far south in the US as one can go). I have many friends who live in southern states, and have eaten at their homes numerous times. I don't know of any that don't use garlic, at least occasionally. How would you make Cajun/Creole cuisine without garlic? Or shrimp and grits? Or Tex-Mex? Or even pizza? The list goes on.

There's even an annual Garlic Fest in Delray Beach, Florida
http://dbgarlicfest.com/

Anyone who isn't at least familiar with garlic - and I don't care where they live - probably needs to get out more. But I sure wouldn't lump everyone in an entire region into that category.
Like.
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Old 07-11-2014, 01:00 PM   #28
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With all the chefs on television, food forums such as DC, published recipes in any language, garlic festivals and many other references, I don't think there is anyone of this earth who hasn't heard of garlic, except maybe the hermit that no one has seen for eons. It is no longer considered just an Italian or Mediterranean secret seasoning. When the Italians first started to immigrate to this country at the turn of the 20th century, one of their foods that they grew because they couldn't find them in the stores was tomatoes. The rest of America found out all the great things you can do with them. Like garlic, they no longer are just an Italian oddity.
This makes no sense to me. My mother's family is from Virginia and North Carolina and serving sliced tomatoes and cucumbers with meals is a long-standing tradition. Italian immigrants did not bring tomatoes to America with them. They probably grew them for the same reason my ancestors did - the old-style tomatoes didn't travel well, which is why they weren't in the stores.
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Old 07-11-2014, 01:33 PM   #29
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I remember Jeff Smith, "The Frugal Gourmet" on his TV series saying something to the effect of - If your lover doesn't like garlic, find another lover...
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Old 07-11-2014, 02:01 PM   #30
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Garlic is said to have been introduced to Britain in the 1540s although there may be a reference to it in a fourteenth century book "The Forme of Cury" ("cury" coming from the french "cuire" and nothing to do with curry)

Some people here still refer to it as "foreign muck"

I would have thought with the French and Spanish influences on food in the south of the US garlic would have been an early introduction.
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