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Old 07-11-2014, 02:15 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Personally unless you are on the dating circuit, who cares about garlic smell?
I love the stuff and pay little if any attention this perceived problem.

Has anyone told you they smell garlic on you? I may smell like garlic (i hope not) but no one ever mentioned it including my close family.
My wife would tell me if there was an issue.

So, whats the real issue. Love of garlic or concern about others perception of you?
"Personally unless you are on the dating circuit, who cares about garlic smell?" - Possibly the person you sit next to on the bus, at work, at the cinema, your partner, your dentist, etc. It's not about how people perceive you it's about how uncomfortable you make people feel.

And some people who eat excessive amounts of garlic don't take excessive amounts of baths and second hand garlic the next day is seriously disgusting.
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Old 07-11-2014, 02:16 PM   #32
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Garlic is said to have been introduced to Britain in the 1540s although there may be a reference to it in a fourteenth century book "The Forme of Cury" ("cury" coming from the french "cuire" and nothing to do with curry)

Some people here still refer to it as "foreign muck"

I would have thought with the French and Spanish influences on food in the south of the US garlic would have been an early introduction.
There are at least (off the top of my head) a dozen states in the American South. RB is speaking of his own experience in the state of South Carolina. I have no idea why garlic would have skipped that one state.
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Old 07-11-2014, 03:14 PM   #33
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Forgive me for saying so, but that's the most outlandish thing I've ever heard. I've lived in both Florida and Texas (which some may say is not part of the south, but that's hogwash. It's about as far south in the US as one can go). I have many friends who live in southern states, and have eaten at their homes numerous times. I don't know of any that don't use garlic, at least occasionally. How would you make Cajun/Creole cuisine without garlic? Or shrimp and grits? Or Tex-Mex? Or even pizza? The list goes on.

There's even an annual Garlic Fest in Delray Beach, Florida
Delray Beach Garlic Fest | The Best Stinkin' Party in Delray Beach

Anyone who isn't at least familiar with garlic - and I don't care where they live - probably needs to get out more. But I sure wouldn't lump everyone in an entire region into that category.
Ever watched the Beverly Hillbilly's on TV?
I am talking extremely rural southern mountain people.
They don't use garlic, they don't eat garlic on purpose and they could care less if they ever used garlic or tasted it in their lives.
Of course you will find the exception if you look hard enough.

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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
"Personally unless you are on the dating circuit, who cares about garlic smell?" - Possibly the person you sit next to on the bus, at work, at the cinema, your partner, your dentist, etc. It's not about how people perceive you it's about how uncomfortable you make people feel.

And some people who eat excessive amounts of garlic don't take excessive amounts of baths and second hand garlic the next day is seriously disgusting.
I can see where the lack of bathing and the overuse of garlic could lead to off odors?
Just never really noticed garlic smell coming from anyone. I hear about it though.
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Old 07-11-2014, 03:18 PM   #34
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This makes no sense to me. My mother's family is from Virginia and North Carolina and serving sliced tomatoes and cucumbers with meals is a long-standing tradition. Italian immigrants did not bring tomatoes to America with them. They probably grew them for the same reason my ancestors did - the old-style tomatoes didn't travel well, which is why they weren't in the stores.
I didn't say they brought them here. What I said was that they could not readily find them so they grew their own. The majority of Italian immigrants were mostly from the land. And you are right. The tomato didn't travel very well. There were no canneries right next to the fields as there is today. The Pirates MIL and FIL every year had a garden that was abundant with fresh produce. What they didn't eat, was canned or frozen. They still do it to this day. Even though they are well into their last years. They were born and lived in Italy during the war, so they knew what hunger was. When they came to this country, the mother was determined her children would never know hunger. They not only had an abundant garden, but also made their own sausages, and other foods. But she had to have those tomatoes. Most of her dishes were dependent on those tomatoes.

Because the south has a longer growing season, the immigrants that settled down there were able to have even greater gardens. She had two sisters that settled in Alabama. She went to visit them in the fall, and their gardens were full and waiting to be picked. She was so impressed, she tried her darnedest to convince her husband to move down there so they could have a better garden than what they were able to grow in the small back yard plot. For her and others like her it was always about growing your own food. Tomatoes included.
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Old 07-11-2014, 03:59 PM   #35
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I didn't say they brought them here. What I said was that they could not readily find them so they grew their own. The majority of Italian immigrants were mostly from the land. And you are right. The tomato didn't travel very well. There were no canneries right next to the fields as there is today. The Pirates MIL and FIL every year had a garden that was abundant with fresh produce. What they didn't eat, was canned or frozen. They still do it to this day. Even though they are well into their last years. They were born and lived in Italy during the war, so they knew what hunger was. When they came to this country, the mother was determined her children would never know hunger. They not only had an abundant garden, but also made their own sausages, and other foods. But she had to have those tomatoes. Most of her dishes were dependent on those tomatoes.

Because the south has a longer growing season, the immigrants that settled down there were able to have even greater gardens. She had two sisters that settled in Alabama. She went to visit them in the fall, and their gardens were full and waiting to be picked. She was so impressed, she tried her darnedest to convince her husband to move down there so they could have a better garden than what they were able to grow in the small back yard plot. For her and others like her it was always about growing your own food. Tomatoes included.
This part - "no longer are just an Italian oddity" - makes it sound like you think America didn't have tomatoes before the Italians taught us what to do with them. And you make it sound like the only people who preserved their food were the Italians you're familiar with in Boston.

Before there were supermarkets, just about everyone grew and preserved their own food, including my German great-grandparents in Michigan and their relatives in Minnesota, and they made their own sausages and sauerkraut as well. My mom, who is about your age, told me that the women in the Virginia town where she grew up used the big kitchens in the local schools to have canning parties - it's more fun, and economical, to do it with a group. Too bad we can't do that anymore.
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Old 07-12-2014, 06:11 AM   #36
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This part - "no longer are just an Italian oddity" - makes it sound like you think America didn't have tomatoes before the Italians taught us what to do with them. And you make it sound like the only people who preserved their food were the Italians you're familiar with in Boston.

Before there were supermarkets, just about everyone grew and preserved their own food, including my German great-grandparents in Michigan and their relatives in Minnesota, and they made their own sausages and sauerkraut as well. My mom, who is about your age, told me that the women in the Virginia town where she grew up used the big kitchens in the local schools to have canning parties - it's more fun, and economical, to do it with a group. Too bad we can't do that anymore.
Canning and quilting parties sadly gone by the wayside. When I was living in Tacoma, I had the privilege of attending both. By way of the church. Lots of fun and laughter. Sharing was just part of the equation.

If my memory serves me right, the tomato, potato, corn and cocoa found their way to Europe via the Native Americans then back. The tomato with great suspicion. And rightly so. Like the potato they are members of the nightshade family. As Martha would say, "Not a good thing."
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Old 07-12-2014, 05:12 PM   #37
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If my memory serves me right, the tomato, potato, corn and cocoa found their way to Europe via the Native Americans then back. The tomato with great suspicion. And rightly so. Like the potato they are members of the nightshade family. As Martha would say, "Not a good thing."
I would say New World or The Americas... Yes, all came from there. I was surprised that both tomatoes and potatoes are Solamum but it's true. I don't see how such different species could be so closely related.

Garlic of course came from Asia. Speaking of which, all this talk decided me to have garlic mashed potatoes tonight!
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Old 07-12-2014, 05:21 PM   #38
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We're back from a week's vacation and I found one garlic bulb and a separate clove sprouting. I'll plant them in the garden tomorrow.
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Old 07-12-2014, 05:25 PM   #39
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If my memory serves me right, the tomato, potato, corn and cocoa found their way to Europe via the Native Americans then back. The tomato with great suspicion. And rightly so. Like the potato they are members of the nightshade family. As Martha would say, "Not a good thing."
Native Americans grew corn, beans and squash. I believe tomatoes, potatoes, cocoa and bell and hot peppers came from further south - Mexico and Central and South America.
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Old 07-12-2014, 06:16 PM   #40
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I would say New World or The Americas... Yes, all came from there. I was surprised that both tomatoes and potatoes are Solamum but it's true. I don't see how such different species could be so closely related.

Garlic of course came from Asia. Speaking of which, all this talk decided me to have garlic mashed potatoes tonight!
It has to do with their pH values. They are alkaline.
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