"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-25-2010, 09:51 PM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 6
thank you everyone! I've read all the posts and find them all very helpful. I've bought the Alton Brown book and it's actually a pretty entertaining read the way it's written. I'm going to see about the local cooking lessons I've never heard about that... I've seen good eats on every now and then but I'll pay more attention to it this time around.

@ poppi: I hope you were kidding! lol If you'll notice there's nothing in there to cook with except the chicken on the bottom which may or may not be good... the milk is definitely expired (which is still in there as I'm typing) and I have two bottles of syrup for some reason.
__________________

__________________
jujin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2010, 11:27 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,722
A few simple tips for you.
Pasta: The water should taste like the seaand you probably need twice as much water as you think you need.
Tomatoes: Serrated knife til the day comes when you want and can afford a knife that will hold an edge. (I hope to get one for Christmas this year.)
Eggs: gentle heat whether it is on top of the stove or in the oven.
Baking powder: less than 6 months old is best
Oil: I would start with a neutral oil like canola and when you learn more about cooking work up to other oils that burn more easily.

Don't worry about a few flops...heck I couldn't figure out why I could never make jello until someone told me what I was doing wrong...many years ago. And I was already and experienced cook then. You learn as much through your failures as through you successes.

When you use a recipe follow the directions to the letter the first time you make it. Then as time goes on and you begin to become more familiar with different foods and how they work you will be able to make small changes and put your own spin on things.

I almost envy you your situation. I would love to start this adventure all over again- learning to cook- especially now that the internet makes information so easy to get. You can find many videos on-line that will tell you how to make a dish or how to use a piece of equipment. Just yesterday I looked up how to make Vietnamese spring rolls and learned several new things. That's one of the great things about cooking... you will always be learning. It keeps things fresh! Best wishes.
__________________

__________________
joesfolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2010, 12:47 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,888
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I really like the videos you can find on YouTube. I'm learning Danish cooking and I don't know anyone here who can teach me. I found a video that shows how to cut a piece of meat to make a roulade. I've watched it many times and keep practising. I learned how to tie up that roulade and I can do a beautiful job of it in a jiffy now. While watching a video of Alton Brown's Good Eats, I snickered to my DH that when I tie up a roulade, it looks better than that! And I learned it by watching it on my computer.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 10:42 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I really like the videos you can find on YouTube. I'm learning Danish cooking and I don't know anyone here who can teach me. I found a video that shows how to cut a piece of meat to make a roulade. I've watched it many times and keep practising. I learned how to tie up that roulade and I can do a beautiful job of it in a jiffy now. While watching a video of Alton Brown's Good Eats, I snickered to my DH that when I tie up a roulade, it looks better than that! And I learned it by watching it on my computer.
I look for vids on youtube if I want something specific but the amount of cooking videos is extremely overwhelming. I'm looking to start from point a (which would be the basics) and work my way up.
__________________
jujin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 11:36 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post

Don't worry about a few flops...heck I couldn't figure out why I could never make jello until someone told me what I was doing wrong...many years ago
Ok, I gotta know. How can you make Jello wrong???
__________________
PattY1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2010, 11:41 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,888
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by jujin View Post
I look for vids on youtube if I want something specific but the amount of cooking videos is extremely overwhelming. I'm looking to start from point a (which would be the basics) and work my way up.
Yup, specific is very useful. But, if you browse a bit and look at something that strikes your fancy every once in a while, that can be good learning too, even if you don't try the recipe.

As to basics, here is a good, very short video on using a knife safely.



I would just add that you should tuck your thumb in, behind your index finger.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 11:20 AM   #17
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,722
Quote:
Originally Posted by PattY1 View Post

Ok, I gotta know. How can you make Jello wrong???
If you don't disolve it thoroughly you end up with a thick nasty rubbery layer in the bottom of the bowl. I did this for years and it never occurred to me that I needed to disolve it longer until someone told me what I was doing wrong...Okay so I'm dense but in my own defense I was learning to cook with no help. I even refused to bring jello dishes to church pot lucks because I knew how bad mine always was!!!!
__________________
joesfolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 11:28 AM   #18
Senior Cook
 
snickerdoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Quad Cities, Midwest
Posts: 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
If you don't disolve it thoroughly you end up with a thick nasty rubbery layer in the bottom of the bowl. I did this for years and it never occurred to me that I needed to disolve it longer until someone told me what I was doing wrong...Okay so I'm dense but in my own defense I was learning to cook with no help. I even refused to bring jello dishes to church pot lucks because I knew how bad mine always was!!!!
So that's why my jello turns out rubbery!! See, you weren't the only one. I really don't like the stuff anyway so it doesn't matter I guess.
__________________
snickerdoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 11:38 AM   #19
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,297
I make Jello in huge batches...Shrek loves the stuff.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 10:57 PM   #20
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,722
My son loves lime jello but gets absolutely irate if you adulterate it with anything else. What kind of a person really likes lime jello. I warn you, he is designing the aircraft you will be flying in.
__________________

__________________
joesfolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.