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Old 05-16-2010, 04:04 AM   #1
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I want to make tofu, not buy it

Vegetarian granddaughter is coming for a visit.... Would like to ensure that she is well fed.... so how do I make tofu. Don't want to buy it.. want to make it

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Old 05-16-2010, 05:43 AM   #2
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Here's a link:

Making Tofu and Soy Milk at Home -- Ellen's Kitchen - faqs

I have never made homemade tofu, but I understand you have to be scrupulously clean, and use it that same day or the next at the latest. It spoils faster than yogurt.
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Old 05-16-2010, 05:47 AM   #3
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Im not sure if your asking how to make tofu itself from scratch, or how to make a tofu dish and cook with it ( or both).

But, if your asking how to make tofu from scratch, it is similar to cheese making.
-you need soy milk ( which can be found in the dairy section of the grocery store)
-something to coagulate the soy milk ( separates curds from liquid)
- a tofu press ( presses the curds together to form a block of tofu)

If your really want to take it to the next level, you can actually buy the soy beans and make the soy milk yourself. Ive never taken it to that level :tongu:

How to make tofu at home - the basic tofu recipe

Ive done it before, and got the supplies from this site ( the coagulants and tofu press).

There is a lot of info on the above site, in much more detail than I could explain. It was a simple process.

The only thing that I remember is , there is a fine line of how much coagulant to use. The more you use, the firmer the tofu is , but, the more of the flavor of the coagulant is picked up in the tofu. May take a few tries to get it right. Its a fairly quick process to if i remember correctly.

I did it because i enjoy knowing the process of how foods are made, and this was just one of my many experiments. If this is going to be a one time thing, Im not sure if its worth the time or effort since tofu is readily available and inexpensive.
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Old 05-16-2010, 05:49 AM   #4
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Looks like Selkie beat me to the punch on this one
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Old 05-16-2010, 06:01 AM   #5
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Thanks Selkie and Larry. I really just want to make the tofu myself. There are heaps of recipes around for using the end product. I enjoy experimenting, so I shall find a recipe on the net somewhere. I wonder what the coagulant substance is. I will look around.
Will give it a try this week and let you know how I go.
(My father- single parent - used to make junket regularly.... YUK! one of my most unfavourite desserts... it had a coagulant to curdle the milk. - I wonder if it was the same thing as is used in tofu making.... I never imposed that yukky stuff on my children!!)
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Old 05-16-2010, 06:34 AM   #6
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How to make tofu at home - the basic tofu recipe

This website sells the coagulants necessary.
"Natural calcium sulfate (gypsum) and magnesium chloride (nigari) are the most common tofu coagulants used. They have been used for hundreds years in Japan and China. Nigari is composed mainly of magnesium chloride, but also contains other minerals found in seawater, with the exception of sodium chloride (sea salt). Gypsum is a naturally occurring calcium sulfate."

Be sure to get the stuff that is supposed to be used for cooking, and not the industrial stuff.

Im also an experimenter. Made tofu, cheese, wine and have a closet full of all kinds of gadgets and gizmos.

Have fun experimenting.
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Old 05-16-2010, 06:46 AM   #7
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Thanks Larry,
I shall have to find an Australian distributor.
Live on the coast in OZ, so how would a cup of sea water go?... only kidding:P
Am sure that there is some supplier within my ambit. I really want to do this from scratch.
Will try it on the spouse before favourite granddaughter arrives... He will be spitting I know as he does not like the stuff... but maybe fresh will be different from the supermarket variety??
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Old 05-16-2010, 06:49 AM   #8
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ps: Eldest daughter wanted me to do a course on cheese making with her next week, but it's a 7 hour drive to her place so I declined.
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Old 05-16-2010, 07:53 AM   #9
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the homemade stuff is definitely a fresher taste, in my opinion more silky too, but that could have been because i added too little of the coagulant stuff. Im sure you will be able to find a distributor there that has a supply of this stuff. maybe even a natural food market or health store may carry it too. Im not sure if it has any other purpose or uses other than to make tofu.

As for cheese making, Ive made paneer myself , since it is easy and i often cook indian food. I thent attempted to make fresh mozzarella cheese. I wasnt as successful. apparently once gallon of milk should yield about a poung of fresh mozzarella. After I was done kneading it and doing whatever I had to do, i was left with a grape sized ( and a very small grape sized ) piece of cheese. It looked so easy on the dvd

My wine experience came from my over abundance of kiwi's that i had in the garden. Had enough fresh, jam, pies with hundreds left over. The wine , in my opinion, came out fine. But for those who really enjoy wine, they said it wasnt that great doesnt bother me any, i just cook with the stuff.
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