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Old 08-26-2015, 02:01 PM   #31
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Corrections to above posted recipe:

How many of you love ice cream? Wow, I could hear that enthusiastic Yes, all the way here in SSM. how many of you have made ice cream that has great texture, even after being frozen? Wait, everything's quiet. Well kids, let the Chief show you how it's done. I give you Maplenut Ice Cream. And let me just say that this stuff is amazing. Want the recipe? I thought so.
Pay attention, I'm only going to type this once.

Addie, quit throwing things at me. Remember, I live in the snow capital of the United States. Winter will be back. Now pay attention.

Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups heavy cream
1 1/2 cups whole milk (set aside a half cup to mix with egg yolks and sugar)
6 large egg yolks, just the yolks. cup grade b maple syrup (found wherever pure
1/2 cup grade-b maple syrup (can be purchased in bulk food stores)
1/4 cup light corn syrup
3 tbs, sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1 packet Knox unflavored gelatin
1/2 tsp. butter flavoring
1 cup broken walnut, or pecan pieces.

Put the cream and the milk into a saucepan over medium heat. While it's heating, beat the egg yolks and sugar together. Add the half cup of milk to the yolks and sugar and whisk together until smooth.

Add the Maple syrup to the heating milk/cream mixture and whisk together for thirty seconds of so. Let heat until it's about to start simmering. Add the salt and turn heat to its lowest setting.

Add the gelatine and stir until dissolved. Finally ladle a half cup of the milk and cream base into the egg yolk while stirring. This will temper the egg yolks so that they incorporate smoothly into the base, and not curdle. Turn the heat down again and whisk the yolk/sugar mixture into the pan. Now, add the butter flavor and stir it in. Keep stirring until the base starts to thicken. Tun off the heat and keep stirring. When the ice cream base coats a spoon, and you can run your finger down it without the base dripping, it's thick enough. Now, cool in an ice bath until at least room temperature cold.
Pour this lovely concoction into your ice cream maker and follow the machine's directions for making ice cream. My ice cream maker calls for 30 to forty minutes of churning to make the finished product.

Add the nut meats after the ice cream has been churning for 15 minutes. When done, place in a sealed container and put in the freezer for a day. Then enjoy.

Of course, if you use corn syrup instead of maple syrup, you can add cocoa powder for chocolate ice cream, cream cheese and vanilla, with macerated strawberries for strawberry cheesecake flavor, or add butter scotch, blueberries, peanut butter and chocolate chips, just plain vanilla, or whatever flavor you want. If you add nutmeg and vanilla, you get egg-nog flavored ice cream. You can make any flavor you heart desires, even corn, or mushroom (both of which, when I did them, came out wonderful, especially the mushroom (Must use candy cap mushrooms as they taste like maple)).

Be creative with you flavors. If you make some kind of mint flavored ice cream, don't invite me. I detest the flavor of mint. But if you enjoy it, more power to you.

And just so ya knows, this base gave me a very nice ice cream texture.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-26-2015, 02:19 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Corrections to above posted recipe:

How many of you love ice cream? Wow, I could hear that enthusiastic Yes, all the way here in SSM. how many of you have made ice cream that has great texture, even after being frozen? Wait, everything's quiet. Well kids, let the Chief show you how it's done. I give you Maplenut Ice Cream. And let me just say that this stuff is amazing. Want the recipe? I thought so.
Pay attention, I'm only going to type this once.
Sounds good.

I think it can also depend some on the type of ice cream maker being used. We always have used the kind where you put ice and salt around the bucket and let it churn while continuing to add ice as it melts. The ice cream is always is so soft and melts so fast.

I recently (last week) bought a single serve ice cream maker by Hershey's that comes with frozen mugs that you freeze for 24 hours before use (they are basically have an aluminum type of inside and are hollow with water inside which freezes). We made a basic vanilla recipe and chilled it for a few hours in the fridge before churning. It took less than 30 minutes and it was the best homemade ice cream I ever had. It was the perfect consistency - almost like store-bought. Just haven't tried to freeze it yet.
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Old 08-26-2015, 04:24 PM   #33
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How important is the gelatine? 'Cause now we are looking at ice cream that even ovo-lacto vegetarians can't eat.
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Old 08-26-2015, 10:13 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
How important is the gelatine? 'Cause now we are looking at ice cream that even ovo-lacto vegetarians can't eat.
The gelatine is used to absorb some of the water, preventing them from freezing so hard. You can also use corn starch, or tapioca starch, or even pectine to do the same thing. The idea is to turn some of that water into an emulsion than is more difficult to freeze. Sugar help lower the freezing point of water, and so helps as well. That's where syrups and sugar come into play, not only for their flavors, but to help with the texture.

An edible anti-freeze is often used in commercial ice cream to control the formation of ice, thus keeping the right softness in the ice cream at freezer temps. The agent used is propylene glycol, and is considered safe for moderate consumption.

Ethylene glycol is what is used as an antifreeze in our car and truck engines. It is poisonous, and spills must be cleaned up, as dogs seem to like its flavor. They lap it up, then die.

We don't have propylene glycol available to us, and so use other agents to control how frozen our ice cream gets.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 09-16-2015, 09:51 AM   #35
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Bad News: Alcohol Trick Won't Work

I thank you all for the ideas and the vodka trick, but it looks like that won't work.

The other day I made the recipe with 3 Tbs vodka. It never got hard in the ice cream maker (between soft-serve and soup), yet it still got too hard in the freezer overnight.

IOW, even with the freezing point depressed too low, it still gets too hard in the freezer.

Still tastes good, though.

On to the next experiments.
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Old 09-16-2015, 10:29 AM   #36
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Why not just a traditional custard base (flavored if you like) and let the ice cream sit in its serving dish for a short slice of time before serving it? Egg yolks, sugar, cream, milk... pretty simple stuff.

Perhaps the problem is that we're making too much of it and expecting it to stay soft in the freezer for a month.

Maybe give fresh a try - make about what one plans to serve immediately? While I'm sure your recipe is effective, why emulate what a manufacturer of ice cream strives for?
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Old 09-16-2015, 10:37 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by CStanford View Post
Why not just a traditional custard base (flavored if you like) and let the ice cream sit in its serving dish for a short slice of time before serving it? Egg yolks, sugar, cream, milk... pretty simple stuff.

Perhaps the problem is that we're making too much of it and expecting it to stay soft in the freezer for a month.

Maybe give fresh a try? Why emulate what a manufacturer of ice cream strives for?
Right. The problem is lack of sugar. It doesn't stay soft in the freezer even overnight.

And yes, it is fine if I let it defrost for a while.
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Old 09-16-2015, 10:48 AM   #38
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A very small puddle on the bottom of the dish is a small price to pay for fresh, natural ingredients. Scoop it over a piece of genoise and a little melt is quite desirable.

There's no real reason to expect ice cream to be perfectly soft five seconds after it's scooped out of the freezer. If it's hard to scoop, heat the scoop under scalding water, shake it, then scoop. That, or set the whole container on the counter, or make the ice cream right before it's needed and serve it out of the machine (best option).
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Old 09-16-2015, 11:29 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by PianoAl View Post
Right. The problem is lack of sugar. It doesn't stay soft in the freezer even overnight.

And yes, it is fine if I let it defrost for a while.
To me, all of the additives seem to be a solution in search of a problem, especially for the home cook who otherwise has a desire to serve fresh food made from fresh ingredients. I think this describes most people who take the time to participate in an online forum about food.

And in the case of 'leftover' ice cream a little defrosting time will pretty much put it right the next day or two.
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