"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-21-2010, 11:31 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 2
Identifying a Burger Type

Hello,

I am new to this forum and kinda new cooking business.
My question goes as following:

How can you tell the differences between burgers, i mean the way you cook them.

I want to know a good way to know how to cook the following types and how to identify:

Rare
Medium Rare
Medium
Medium Well
Well Done

I hav tried to google this question but couldn't seem to find a good answer. Your help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

__________________

__________________
Epsilon37 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 01:32 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
mcnerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,326
I only use those designations for full cuts of meat and their internal temperature will dictate their doneness. For me ground meat has too much potential for bacteria contamination so it is either well done, medium well, or burnt.
__________________

__________________
Support bacteria. It's the only culture some people have.
mcnerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 01:49 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,891
I agree fully with mcnurd.......especially if you are cooking burgers to sell. You sure don't want to be responsible for a sick customer. Use the touch test on the burgers. Poke the top with your finger, a "no pink left" burger will feel firm to the poke. I know it sounds too easy to be true, but it is.
Good luck, and welcome to DC
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 02:02 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
mcnerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,326
With hamburgers one should also make an indentation in the middle of it, which will prevent the ends from curling up. The indentation can be made with a clean thumb, spoon, golf ball, or similar object. I tried using an egg once and ended up with an egg [shell] burger.
__________________
Support bacteria. It's the only culture some people have.
mcnerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2010, 11:27 AM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: japan
Posts: 462
Rare - pink all the way through, but not actually raw in the center; juices just starting to run noticably around edge; meat soft to the touch, but some "bounce back to shape" as opposed to raw hamburger
Medium Rare - mostly pink; juices just starting running within burger; meat still soft to touch
Medium - about 1/2 pink; juices exiting center of burger and pooling on outside; meat feeling firmer, somewhat "bloated"
Medium Well - still some small vestige of pink in center; little juice left inside; meat rather firm
Well Done - no pink left; meat fairly dry; quite firm

this is about how they should be when you bite into them, but there's no way around it; to tell by look and touch will just take experience

a thin burger can be cooked quite quickly on fairly high heat, but a thick burger should be done on a slower section on the grill for a longer length of time to ensure that it's not raw in the middle and burnt on the outside.

__________________
let me make sure that wine's ok before i use it.
philso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2010, 12:22 PM   #6
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Though I agree, and would go to the "more done" temp for burgers, here is a simple, and easy method to test:

The Finger Test to Check the Doneness of Meat | Simply Recipes
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2010, 12:52 PM   #7
Senior Cook
 
JamesS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: VA
Posts: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnerd View Post
I only use those designations for full cuts of meat and their internal temperature will dictate their doneness. For me ground meat has too much potential for bacteria contamination so it is either well done, medium well, or burnt.
Scaredy cat! You're right of course, but I won't live my life in fear of a little food poisoning.

If you're like me and enjoy your meat (ground or otherwise) extremely rare you need to be comfortable with the food handling procedures of the folks you buy your meat from...and you have to take extra precautions once it's in your possession. I'd never leave hamburger from the local grocery store rare.

However, when I buy meat from an Angus ranch two hours away, that's butchered and packaged well beyond competently and grind it myself, I'm comfortable cooking to taste...or not cooking at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I agree fully with mcnurd.......especially if you are cooking burgers to sell. You sure don't want to be responsible for a sick customer. Use the touch test on the burgers. Poke the top with your finger, a "no pink left" burger will feel firm to the poke. I know it sounds too easy to be true, but it is.
Good luck, and welcome to DC
That method also works with well with steaks. Actually, it works better for steaks because there's seldom a big slab of cheese on a steak! It takes a bit of practice to be able to tell a medium from a medium rare/well that way, but it's a skill well worth learning. An instant read thermometer is the best training partner you could hope for.

Here's a rough guide to temperature:
Rare 120
Medium Rare 130
Medium 140
Medium Well 150
Well 160
Burned beyond all recognition 170

Most folks will tell you to take ground beef to 160...good advice if you aren't comfortable with the meat.
__________________
JamesS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2010, 02:23 PM   #8
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,229
For me, the simple answer for rare burgers is to chop or grind whole cuts just prior to cooking. I prefer to chop rather than ground as I prefer the texture. "Ground" beef is more crushed than ground. The meat is forced through a plate until it becomes a paste.
If you have sharp tools, chopping does not take that long.
__________________
Bigjim68 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2010, 02:38 PM   #9
Certified Cake Maniac
 
LPBeier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: The Great "Wet" North, Surrey, BC
Posts: 18,941
Burgers MUST be cooked all the way through. To keep mine moist I cook until there is just a touch of pink left and the burger is slightly soft to the touch but still fairly firm. Then I take them off the heat, put cheese on if wanted, and tent with foil for a couple of minutes. When you eat it the burger is fully cooked but juicy.
__________________
Living gluten/dairy/sugar/fat/caffiene-free and loving it!


http://beinglydia.com
LPBeier is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2010, 04:00 PM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 2
Thanks the finger test is the best. And about eating it undercooked? Hmm i like to take chances
__________________

__________________
Epsilon37 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.