"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-21-2009, 04:49 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1
Identifying spice ingredients in a mixed spice...

Hello.

My GrandMa had these 2 special spices that she would always use on beef and chicken. Our family always liked it. Sadly, she fell ill, and she passed away several months ago. I have missed her and have even craved her cooking ever since.

I looked through her old recipe drawer but I havent been able to locate the way she mixed this stuff up. It is a mixture of a bunch of spices I am sure. I do have a small amount of each of the actual spice mixtures left in bags.

Is there any possible way to identify the spices in these mixes and approximate quantities? I dont have a fortune, and this is only for my family use, but I could pay for the service if such is available and if it doesnt cost excessively. I searched food labs but it only returned huge, government type labs.

Any ideas appreciated!

With Thanks, JohnL

__________________

__________________
John L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2009, 08:30 AM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Silversage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 863
Take your little baggie to a local chef. They can probably identify the major components for you.
__________________

__________________
Silversage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2009, 10:29 AM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 106
I agree with that, and maybe even take to a place like Penzeys, ...maybe?
__________________
"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, it is not an act, but a habit." Aristotle
Nyeer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2009, 03:27 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Unless Grandma used finely ground herbs the individual components should be identifiable both visually and by taste. Visit Penzeys website for more info.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2009, 04:03 PM   #5
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Unless Grandma used finely ground herbs the individual components should be identifiable both visually and by taste. Visit Penzeys website for more info.
How would you identify onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, cinnamon, celery salt, chili powder, curry powder, etc. all mixed together visually? I do not see how that would be possible.

I think the best suggestion so far is to take it to a local chef (at a good restaurant) and ask if he would try to identify it for you. Short of bringing it to a lab for a ton of money I think that would be the best bet.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2009, 04:33 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,404
A good chef should be able to taste it and tell you pretty close what spices are in the mix. I hope she had just simple spices from grocery store mixed together.

I am very sorry for your loss. I lost my grandmother almost 30 years ago and can still taste her food. It was unbelievable.

I hope you find what you are looking for.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2009, 04:49 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
How would you identify onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, cinnamon, celery salt, chili powder, curry powder, etc. all mixed together visually? I do not see how that would be possible.

I think the best suggestion so far is to take it to a local chef (at a good restaurant) and ask if he would try to identify it for you. Short of bringing it to a lab for a ton of money I think that would be the best bet.
I said- unless herbs were finely ground
Powder = finely ground
Hang up your spoon if you cannot tell the difference between dried marjoram, sage, thyme, oregano, rosemary; see the reddish tinge of paprika and smell the presence of garlic, onion, and cumin.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2009, 07:12 AM   #8
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
When everything is mixed together it can be very difficult to identify individual players. Also, just because you see red that does not automatically mean regular paprika. There are many ground peppers that have the same color. My ancho pepper powder would look identical to paprika in a mix and with other stronger flavors like garlic and onion would be very difficult to identify by taste alone.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2009, 08:55 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
GrillingFool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: usa
Posts: 2,223
I say everyone who thinks this would be easy should have their significant other, or a friend, mix up a random assortment of spices, let it sit in a plastic bag or jar for a couple of months, opening it once a day for a minute or so...

then try to ID the spices. It isn't as easy as one thinks. Once they have been hanging out for a while, smells transfer and meld, as do flavors.

Or I just need to hang up my spoon and get a new nose and taste buds....
__________________

GrillingFool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2009, 09:14 AM   #10
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I am with you GF.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.