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Old 12-08-2014, 01:23 PM   #31
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My daughter among the top 5 in her class of 250 cant boil an egg. Has the smarts, but cooking is just not her thing nor her interest ( except pancakes, she enjoys making them from scratch).

My son, on the other hand, not great at it, but puts a lot of effort .

Any time I get a phone call at work from my son, its always about cooking. ( how long to I keep it in the oven for? What temperature? whats the name of that spice ..?) I think its hysterical, cause Im not talking most the time he calls, Im talking %100 they tell me he is on the phone, its a cooking question, and I love it
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Old 12-08-2014, 01:35 PM   #32
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I know people from all over the spectrum, from those who make some of their own ingredients to those who make "semi-homemade" meals to those who use pre-prepped or cooked supermarket foods to those who eat out most of the time. It all depends on many factors - interest, budget, family composition and schedules. I did many things differently when I was working and going to school than I did when I was just working and what I do now that I just volunteer for whatever I want to do. When we had exchange students, I did make a special effort to have home-cooked meals most of the week, but with sports and band schedules, we did the best we could.

It all just depends.
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Old 12-08-2014, 01:55 PM   #33
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An associate (who himself cooks well) lives in a new, upscale urban development. You know the kind. $250,000 and a Yard that you (literally) can't swing a cat in. All the houses have well-appointed kitchen. Many have very high dollar commercial style equipment. But the vast majority never cook. Nothing.

Aside from the expense, There's something fundamentally human missing there. The act of turning raw materials into good food. The laying on of hands that results in nourishment provided to others. Those are expressions that cannot be conveyed by paying a restaurant bill. The communion of the meal itself, gathered together around the home hearth; that is the thing that combined connection and practical service and says that here is caring and appreciation and identification as partners of the hearth.

You know, when archeological sites where paleo peoples lived, the seasonal rock shelters where the useful and plants and animal foods were to be had at that time of year, the feature that most often and most prominently identifies it is the hearth, the pit with blackened rocks and ash layer. When an excavation is proceeding horizontally, that ash lens is what says that here is where they gathered. It's not unusual for every single artifact to have been used to obtain, prepare or cook their food. That hearth is the center around which their lives moved.

And without that functioning hearth, where is the center of the home? We know the answer, and it is a sadness.
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Old 12-08-2014, 02:54 PM   #34
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My mother didn't allow me in HER kitchen. She just insisted I didn't know how to cook. If I would try, she would take over because I was doing it wrong. She never wanted me to leave home and wanted me to always need her. I was not allowed to do anything at home because I "didn't know how." When I finally moved out on my own I learned on my own. After 3 weeks in my first apartment I decided I'd better clean it because no one else was going to do it. The first time I did laundry I put undies in with blue jeans and had to wear tattle tale grey undies. One thing I CAN say, I never cooked the turkey forgetting to take the bag of giblets out of it!!
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Old 12-08-2014, 02:59 PM   #35
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One time my daughter told me the ladies at work wanted to have a cookie exchange. I baked some cookies for her to take. When she came home that day she was laughing. She said the rest of the ladies cookies were terrible! And they were. Most of them were the refrigerated cookies that you just slice or break off and bake. They tasted like they had a lot of preservatives in them. I think they all thought everyone else would bake from scratch.

My daughter never wanted to learn to cook or bake. She survived. She is married and they eat. They do a lot of cooking on the grill. She did New Years Day at her house one year and invited everyone over. Everything was good. I was surprised.

My son is also a good cook. He does most of the cooking at his house. I didn't teach him. He belongs to a social club where the men do a lot of cooking and I think he learned from them.
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Old 12-08-2014, 03:31 PM   #36
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My oldest daughter was in the kitchen with me when she was five. She learned to fix breakfast and lunch for her siblings. My two boys went with their father as soon as they were old enough to the summer jobs he was working as chefs. They learned the hard lessons of the professional kitchens. Every morning off to work they would go, in the afternoon it was their play time. As a result they are all good cooks.

No, cooking is not just a new trend. It has always been part of society. But now that we are rediscovering that being in the kitchen in not a chore, but fun, we are passing it along to the next generation.
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Old 12-08-2014, 04:00 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPa View Post
My mother didn't allow me in HER kitchen. She just insisted I didn't know how to cook. If I would try, she would take over because I was doing it wrong. She never wanted me to leave home and wanted me to always need her. I was not allowed to do anything at home because I "didn't know how." When I finally moved out on my own I learned on my own. After 3 weeks in my first apartment I decided I'd better clean it because no one else was going to do it. The first time I did laundry I put undies in with blue jeans and had to wear tattle tale grey undies. One thing I CAN say, I never cooked the turkey forgetting to take the bag of giblets out of it!!
That is so sad. Both you and your mother missed out on a chance of experiencing some wonderful times together. It is like my DIL. None of her girls were allowed in her kitchen either. But just think how surprised she is that you can learn all by yourself.
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Old 12-08-2014, 05:59 PM   #38
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My brother's kids are good cooks. He has a son and a daughter in their 20's and they can both cook. They share a house and due to a tight budget they cook almost everything that they eat, they even make most of their own bread. Their dad, my brother never showed any interest in cooking, but after his first divorce, I helped him learn. They learned most of the basics from their mom who is a great scratch cook.
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Old 12-08-2014, 11:03 PM   #39
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You know, when archeological sites where paleo peoples lived, the seasonal rock shelters where the useful and plants and animal foods were to be had at that time of year, the feature that most often and most prominently identifies it is the hearth, the pit with blackened rocks and ash layer. When an excavation is proceeding horizontally, that ash lens is what says that here is where they gathered. It's not unusual for every single artifact to have been used to obtain, prepare or cook their food. That hearth is the center around which their lives moved.
This is a little over the top, imo. Society would not have progressed very far if we all still had to hunt, gather, prepare and cook our own food. And just because some people take shortcuts doesn't mean that families don't eat together.
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Old 12-08-2014, 11:21 PM   #40
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...However, to address one point, I don't point a finger at the parents. Case in point, I tried many times to interest my own daughter in cooking when she was growing up. I would try to have her help with meal preparation or shopping, but she had absolutely no interest in it whatsoever at the time. I would certainly hope that no one thinks me a bad parent for not giving her proper instruction, but it wasn't from a lack of trying...
I probably didn't express my feeling as well as I could.

A parent can't force a child to take an interest in cooking. I have two daughters who never did. But they saw my ex and me cooking for them and maybe it registered in the dim reaches that this was a good thing. My older daughter now cooks well for her family and my younger daughter is developing a real interest in cooking and food culture.

If a child sees a parent with no interest in cooking, that could influence them as an adult.
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