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Old 01-15-2009, 04:00 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
A chuck steak is too tough for me. Same with chuck-eye, which I seldom see cut into a steak -- it's generally a larger hunk.

Anything labeled chuck gets braised. Unless it's a burger.
I rarely see chuck-eye steaks either...At one time they were quite popular here....Cooked like a normal grilling steak (hot & fast) you've got a 50/50 chance of having something you can chew...When you get lucky it's not bad....Not a Rib-eye...but Ok.

Braising is my preferred method for large portions of Chuck too....
A nice large Chuck roast can also be BBQed...using the same methods used for pork Butts..

Have Fun!
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Old 01-15-2009, 04:03 PM   #22
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I look for Chuck eye with marbling and it is surprisingly tender; a different league to Chuck steak I think.

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I rarely see chuck-eye steaks either...At one time they were quite popular here....Cooked like a normal grilling steak (hot & fast) you've got a 50/50 chance of having something you can chew...When you get lucky it's not bad....Not a Rib-eye...but Ok.

Braising is my preferred method for large portions of Chuck too....
A nice large Chuck roast can also be BBQed...using the same methods used for pork Butts..

Have Fun!
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Old 01-15-2009, 04:10 PM   #23
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I look for Chuck eye with marbling and it is surprisingly tender; a different league to Chuck steak I think.

I agree...they are not the same. I also agree it is a surprise when you find a nice tender chuck-eye steak!!!

Have Fun & Enjoy!!!
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Old 01-15-2009, 04:28 PM   #24
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I look for Chuck eye with marbling and it is surprisingly tender; a different league to Chuck steak I think.

They are similar, in fact. Both are from the chuck or shoulder part of the cow. Marbling doesn't matter very much when you are starting out with a tougher cut to begin with.

Anything from the chuck section of the cow is going to be tougher than many other cuts.

Like Uncle Bob said, it's a cousin to the rib eye steak which is located farther down toward the animal's midsection. A chuck eye will not be as tender or flavorful as a rib eye.

If you cook it past medium with dry heat it will be dry and tough.
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Old 01-15-2009, 04:36 PM   #25
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Then how is it that people are able to slow cook steaks (like ribeye, tenderloin) in a smoker/grill and get very tender results without it drying out?
They are not able to COOK those cuts of meat low and slow without turning them into veritable shoe soles. Smoking is a different technique. However, in my area, smoking a Porterhouse is not a common practice.
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Old 01-15-2009, 04:39 PM   #26
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A chuck steak is too tough for me. Same with chuck-eye, which I seldom see cut into a steak -- it's generally a larger hunk.

Anything labeled chuck gets braised. Unless it's a burger.
Jenny, back in the day, we used to marinate chuck steak overnight and then grill them. They were butterknife tender, but without the marinade, they would have been a bonafide disaster.
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Old 01-16-2009, 01:19 PM   #27
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Are you saying that only tough meats should be smoked?
Why does cooking tender meats 'low and slow' turn them into shoe soles?

Is it the acid in the marinade that makes the beef tender? Would you suggest soaking the meat in white vinegar the night before cooking?

Quote:
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They are not able to COOK those cuts of meat low and slow without turning them into veritable shoe soles. Smoking is a different technique. However, in my area, smoking a Porterhouse is not a common practice.
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Old 01-16-2009, 08:02 PM   #28
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Are you saying that only tough meats should be smoked?
Why does cooking tender meats 'low and slow' turn them into shoe soles?
Tough cuts have connective tissue that as it breaks down and releases it's moisture keep the cut moist during the long slow cook. When you are talking a steak, a tender cut, that connective tissue is not present to break down and supply the moisture to the steak. As the steak cooks slowly it dries out from the exterior inward. A sear with a high temp cook is the best way to handle steaks.

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Old 03-31-2012, 11:08 PM   #29
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Well this is from their web site.

We slow cook our Prime Rib steak for at least 18 hours, then finish with high temperature searing on a char grill to seal in the maximum flavour for your enjoyment.

So I guess you can but I don't know what method they use.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:37 PM   #30
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Well this is from their web site.

We slow cook our Prime Rib steak for at least 18 hours, then finish with high temperature searing on a char grill to seal in the maximum flavour for your enjoyment.

So I guess you can but I don't know what method they use.

Which website is that? I'd like to read up.
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