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Old 04-10-2016, 05:56 AM   #21
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It's only a rip off if the products aren't what they claim to be. If you are willing to pay more for a beer labeled "craft", or a bread labeled "artisan", how are you being ripped off?

Marketers should be free to make any label they want, as long as it's truthful. It's up to consumers to determine if it's beneficial to them.

I don't understand this whole gluten free fad. For people without celiac disease or other gluten intolerance, a gluten free diet can actually be harmful, as it lacks a number of beneficial vitamins, fiber, etc. If people want to make uninformed decisions, they are free to do so. However, it is so easy to quickly get information by using "the googles".
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Old 04-10-2016, 07:37 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I do often buy fruits and vegetables from the farmers market because it's fresher than grocery store produce. They pick it the day before they bring it to the market. I know this because the farmer's wife posts it on Facebook

Artisan is different. Foods made by hand in the traditional way can be better than store-bought, but that isn't always true. It's worth what someone is willing to pay for it. I wouldn't pay $7 for a loaf of bread, but I have paid $5.

I once bought a grass-fed steak from the farmers market and cooked it side by side with a conventional one from the grocery store. We preferred the one from the store Go figure.

However, I'm not about to pay $17 for a free-range chicken when I can get a conventional one for $5-6.

Gluten-free is definitely a fad and has become a huge marketing term. Surveys have shown that many people don't know what gluten is. They also don't know what GMO means or how it works. They just have a vague impression that it's bad for you somehow.
Hey GG,

I agree, 100%. My point to this whole thing is that there are buzz words being used to sell products, that in some cases, aren't really what the label depicts. (Is that the right word?) Okay, "says it is."

In regards to your grass-fed steak comment, I have tried the grass-fed beef, not finding much difference at all, not enough to justify the difference in cost. I don't eat much beef anyway, as I hunt for deer and moose, and raise as goat or two now and then, so that takes care of my reds...

I also tried buying the apple-smoked bacon from a farm market and found it didn't have much flavour... I guess I missed that SALTY TASTE! Holy smokes, it was expensive... !!!

Bring on the KFC (skin only!)

RD
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Old 04-10-2016, 07:38 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
I don't understand this whole gluten free fad. For people without celiac disease or other gluten intolerance, a gluten free diet can actually be harmful, as it lacks a number of beneficial vitamins, fiber, etc.
Sorry, but I have to disagree in part. While I certainly agree gluten free diets are a fad for many people, being on a gluten free diet is in no way harmful. There a lot of ways to include fiber and vitamins in your diet without eating wheat bread.
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Old 04-10-2016, 07:41 AM   #24
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From what I read ( I'm definitely not claiming to be any kind of expert on this), There are 'Certification Procedures) which a company, farm ..must abide by to be legally considered Organic ( which differ from country to country). And with these procedures comes 'Certification Costs' that the company / farms must pay to be allowed to advertise as being an Organizing Food Product. And with this Certification comes the involvement of government, and we all know how that works.

So are there laws and regulations? Absolutely. Does everyone follow these laws ? I would hope so, but I would be naive to think that people/ companies aren't greasing politicians to look the other way so they can pass whatever certifications they may need to get that " Organic' word on their label.

How often do we see on the news about recalls or fines to companies, who get caught with their pants down, after an independent study, by some 20/20 or 60 minutes type of journalists who run random tests and find out the product isn't what you think it is ?

Or lets take the politician in Michigan who ( Im not sure of the exact details, but was in the news recently) who said the water was safe, just to find out there were astronomical levels of lead in the water. We all know anything grown their, using such a high lead water base as irrigation, can't be all that healthy for you, yet up until a few months ago, no one knew.

So getting back to my original post on this thread. I try to stick with places I know , and hopefully I can trust, to get my produce and food products. And if I can grow it myself, I do ( at least for the months Mother Nature allows me to).

Sadly, the mighty dollar often over shadows peoples / companies values. If there is a way to maximize profits by cutting corners, greasing politicians, duping the public, just to get that ' table' on the product for advertising purposes, they will do it. Only one benefiting out of this are the Politicians who get greased, the companies who are benefiting from the increased mark-up by having those health ' tag words' on their packaging, and the lawyers who ultimately have to defend the companies after an independent study was performed ( sorry politicians and lawyers, nothing personal). And the only ones who get hurt, are the consumers who get charged in excess for this organic certifying process, and often don't get what they are paying for.

Marketing also has a field day with this as well. How often do you on the label, " Natural Fruit juice", then you read the fine print, and that only accounts for 5% of the juice. Or the terms Antioxidants, Organic, Whole Grain, Cleansing, 100% natural... Often products may technically fall in to the above category, but are loaded up with other things that may not be healthy for you, but still fit the qualifications to have a certain word on its label ( Notice how the unhealthy stuff isn't in big print). Gluten Free, is the latest health catch-word. Trust me, I'm in the medical profession, I know that there are many issues where a gluten free diet is mandatory for a persons health. But the marketing people are smart, and take these words and pound them into our brains to sell their products. 99% of the time, the consumer doesn't even know what these terms mean, they just know it is associated with good health, and therefore, worth the extra price.

The above is totally my option. May or may not be 100% factual, but Im kinda guessing Im not that far off base.

Sorry guys, this is what happens when I can't sleep, get up at 4am, and go on a rant.

Oh, and another thing, Im fully aware that you can't believe everything you find on the internet. For every article I find to back up my opinions, everyone else can find another that counteracts my thoughts. Guess the internet makes us all experts, and watching Dr. Oz makes us all physicians

One more disclaimer, as unfortunately people are starting to feel like they are being singled out or verbally attacked, My above response was written with no direct person or forum member or in fact, no country in mind. Its just my answer to the original post as to why, for the most part, I agree and feel that we are getting ripped off, and we should all be wise consumers as to what we buy , where we get it from, and how much we pay.
Dude, Larry... LOVE this rant!!

Are you sure you didn't somehow get into my head, sample my brain gravy and write down your (my!!) thoughts??

If you want to read some rants...
The Rugged Dude • Rugged Rant

RD
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Old 04-10-2016, 08:25 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
There a lot of ways to include fiber and vitamins in your diet without eating wheat bread.
Absolutely true, but it takes extra care to do so. Here's some interesting info:

The Truth About Gluten
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Old 04-10-2016, 09:56 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
It's only a rip off if the products aren't what they claim to be. If you are willing to pay more for a beer labeled "craft", or a bread labeled "artisan", how are you being ripped off?

Marketers should be free to make any label they want, as long as it's truthful. It's up to consumers to determine if it's beneficial to them.

I don't understand this whole gluten free fad. For people without celiac disease or other gluten intolerance, a gluten free diet can actually be harmful, as it lacks a number of beneficial vitamins, fiber, etc. If people want to make uninformed decisions, they are free to do so. However, it is so easy to quickly get information by using "the googles".
Gluten Free? One day in the supermarket I was in the vegetable aisle. One company had every single can of vegetable labeled "Gluten Free". I never knew that canned green beans, peas and so many other veggies might have gluten in them. I have always associated gluten with products that contained flour. I better read up on exactly what gluten is.
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Old 04-10-2016, 10:23 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Gluten Free? One day in the supermarket I was in the vegetable aisle. One company had every single can of vegetable labeled "Gluten Free". I never knew that canned green beans, peas and so many other veggies might have gluten in them. I have always associated gluten with products that contained flour. I better read up on exactly what gluten is.
They don't. That's just the manufacturer jumping on the gluten-free marketing bandwagon.
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Old 04-10-2016, 10:38 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
Absolutely true, but it takes extra care to do so. Here's some interesting info:

The Truth About Gluten
Interesting. Not to argue the point, but I don't eat any grains and haven't for almost two years now. Despite that, as far as my doctor and I are able to surmise, I'm healthy as a horse. I don't buy into WebMD's assertion that "whole grain foods, as part of a healthy diet, may help lower risk of heart disease, type-2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer." On the contrary, going completely sugar and grain free was the only thing that reversed my type-2 diabetes and steered my blood lipid parameters into a healthy range.
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Old 04-10-2016, 11:58 AM   #29
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Lightbulb

Re. the idea of being ripped off. If it is known that the product is what it says it is, e.g. organic and is carrying a certified lablel, then it comes down to how much you want to pay for it. It may well be over and above what you deem it is worth, in which case it will be regarded as a 'rip off'.

Whilst I am wary (I will shop around and compare prices), I also prefer quality ingredients and do not begrudge spending a bit more than anticipated for something that I know I will enjoy.
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Old 04-10-2016, 02:04 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Interesting. Not to argue the point, but I don't eat any grains and haven't for almost two years now. Despite that, as far as my doctor and I are able to surmise, I'm healthy as a horse. I don't buy into WebMD's assertion that "whole grain foods, as part of a healthy diet, may help lower risk of heart disease, type-2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer." On the contrary, going completely sugar and grain free was the only thing that reversed my type-2 diabetes and steered my blood lipid parameters into a healthy range.
I am with you on this one Steve. I too was able to bring my Type 2 diabetes down to where I no longer even take the pills. I control my diabetes totally by diet alone. I am not a fan of bread, so that takes care of sandwiches. If I do have one, it is usually a marbled rye and I cut the slice of bread in half and trim off all the crust. That is my rendition of a sandwich. I can't remember the last time I even had a bowl of cereal. I think the last time I bought a small box of Cheerios and would eat them right out of the box as a snack. I like rice, but it has been a couple of years since I had any. My diet consists mostly of meat and veggies.

We have 20 small garden plots on the property. The maintenance crew plant them every spring. And I will often offer to pay one of them for a tomato or other veggie one of them are growing. They grow these foods to feed their families during the growing season. These foods are definitely organic. What their families don't use, they bring them down to the Farmer's Market that Health Clinic in this part of Boston hold every summer. Ninety percent of the sellers are folks such as our maintenance crew from our property and others throughout Boston. Our newest elderly housing building has a rooftop garden. Residents or maintenance crew are free to grow what they want and then sell it at the Farmers Market. Someone had a great idea this time in this city of ours.
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