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Old 03-24-2008, 02:16 PM   #11
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I use Sake in my stir-fry.
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Old 03-24-2008, 02:24 PM   #12
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You just use Sake like you would Rice Vinegar?
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Old 03-24-2008, 02:34 PM   #13
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Actually, sesame oil should be drizzled over the finished dish. It has a low smoke point, so it burns easily at high heat. I use peanut oil for stir-frying. Many years ago, I used to use corn oil for practically everything (I grew up in the Midwest ). Once I discovered other oils, I started using the oil that's common for a given cuisine, and my food tasted much more authentic. Olive oil for Mediterranean, peanut oil for Asian, corn oil for Mexican, TexMex, etc.
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Old 03-24-2008, 02:44 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by EastWestknives View Post
You just use Sake like you would Rice Vinegar?
Yes. If you use the same flavoring, you will get the same results. Sesame oil has a very distinct flavor that I only use once in a while. Same with Soy and Terriyaki. Keep those flavors to a minimum so you don't overpower the fresh veggies.
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Old 03-24-2008, 02:47 PM   #15
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Gotgarlic... my suggestion wasn't for cooking, it was for the sauce you would use
after you have cooked your veggies.
Mix the ingredients, add, mix well, lower heat for a bit.
Works for me, YMMV. :-D
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Old 03-24-2008, 02:57 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by GrillingFool View Post
Gotgarlic... my suggestion wasn't for cooking, it was for the sauce you would use
after you have cooked your veggies.
Mix the ingredients, add, mix well, lower heat for a bit.
Works for me, YMMV. :-D
Ah - sorry for misunderstanding you
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Old 03-24-2008, 03:04 PM   #17
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Before I bought my first wok, I picked up a little cookbook from Kikkoman. It really inspired me. After that, I went on to buying a few cookbooks. Here's a look at their site for some ideas. (I see they have new flavors now, like Miso, Garlic & Green Onion, Ponzu, etc.)

The World of Kikkoman

Recipes, Cooking Products and More for Home Cooks - Kikkoman
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Old 03-24-2008, 03:32 PM   #18
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I'm from the Martin Yan stir-fry school, which says "Everything relies on the sauce." Once the sauce has been established, you can add any type of meat, seafood, or tofu to complete the meal.

Here's two examples, Kung Pao and Mongolian:

KUNG PAO BEEF, PORK, CHICKEN, SHRIMP, FISH OR TOFU (a.k.a. meat!)

1 1/2 pounds beef , pork, or chicken strips, shrimp, tofu, or fish pieces
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon rice wine or sherry
1 egg, beaten
1/2 teaspoon salt

2 Tbs peanut oil
4 dried red chiles, cracked
1 Tbs garlic, minced
1/2 Tbs grated ginger
1 tsp pepper
2 scallions, chopped
1 red bell pepper, cut in strips
2 Tbs soy sauce
3 Tbs rice wine or sherry
2 Tbs balsamic vinegar
1 tsp sugar
1 cup chicken broth
1 Tbs cornstarch, dissolved in 4 Tbs water
1/3 cup unsalted, dry roasted peanuts

Combine the soy sauce, sesame oil, rice wine/sherry, egg and salt in a glass bowl. Add the meat and stir to coat. Marinate for 1 hour, covered, in the refrigerator.

Combine the soy sauce, rice wine, balsamic vinegar, sugar and chicken broth.

Place peanut oil in a wok, and swirl to coat sides, then place over high heat. Add the chilies and cook until they begin to darken. Add the garlic, ginger and pepper and continue to cook to infuse the oil. Add the scallions and bell pepper. Remove the meat from the marinade, and add it to the wok. Stir-fry the meat for 3 minutes. Add the soy sauce, rice wine, balsamic vinegar, sugar and chicken broth mixture to wok and heat to boiling while constantly stirring, then add the cornstarch slurry to thicken the sauce. Add the peanuts and stir to blend.


MONGOLIAN STIR-FRY
Ingredients:

1 pound Flank steak or lean pork, sliced thin; chicken, turkey or tofu, cubed; or shrimp, shelled, cleaned, and deveined
peanut oil for frying
1 small onion or shallot, sliced thin
4 oz snow peas
4 oz Green onion, green part only

4 oz button mushrooms
2 cloves finely minced garlic

Coating:

1 Egg white
1/2 tsp Salt
1 tsp Cornstarch


Sauce:

1 tsp Cornstarch
1 tsp Turbinado Sugar
1 tsp Chinese chili sauce

2 Tbs dry Sherry, white wine, or rice wine
2 Tbs Hoisin sauce
2 Tbs soy sauce
1/4 cup beef, chicken, shrimp, or vegetable stock

Combine sauce ingredients and set aside. Combine egg white, salt and cornstarch, add meat, shrimp or tofu, and mix well to coat. Heat 2 Tbs oil in wok over high heat, then stir fry meat, shrimp or tofu until just cooked through and remove from wok. Add additional Tbs peanut oil to wok and stir fry onion or shallot, and snow peas, and for 1 minute. Add green onion, mushrooms and garlic and continue stir-frying until mushrooms are tender. Add sauce to vegetables and heat until sauce has thickened. Add meat, shrimp or tofu and stir until heated through.
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Old 04-13-2008, 07:53 PM   #19
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I use salt, blk pepper, and finely ground red pepper flakes with my stir fry. I don't use any sauce but it still turns out very tasty.
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Old 04-13-2008, 09:43 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by EastWestknives View Post
Ladies and Gentleman,

I found this wonderful page last year that had a universal curry recipe. It listed all the things you absolutely needed and then listed optional things to experiment with. I found it a joy to cook this way rather than slavishly following the recipe. So, now I want to move on to stir fry. Does anyone have a kind of universal stir fry recipe they use and then what are some things you can add to spice it up for variation?

Thanks!!
Stir Fry is a cooking method/technique - it is not a recipe. There are recipes that are cooked by stir fry - but, I would hate to burden you with recipes since you have a self-admitted adversion to following instructions. Instead - here are the basics for a proper stir fry:

1. Prep your ingredients before you begin cooking - in French this would be called mis en place. Once you start cooking - it goes quickly and you don't have time to slice-n-dice ....

2. Heat your pan/wok

3, Add your oil

4. Cook - adding the ingredients in the order of cooking time (add those that need longer cooking time first .. etc.)
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