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Old 11-27-2007, 10:05 AM   #31
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Get a small gas grill--buy meat, light grill, put meat on grill--hard to beat...

Hamburger gravy over toast!
Fry hamburger up in a skillet, breaking it up as it fries. Add salt and pepper. When the burger is done, sprinkle with flour, around 2 tbls or until the meat has a bit of floured look. Stir and fry the flour for a bit to toast it up--just a few minutes.

Pour milk in and bring to a boil while stirring. When it thickens, your done. Season to taste(salt, pepper) enjoy.

You can also use sausage. This is a good intro into cooking gravies, an important item to learn to cook.

So many things that are simple but tasty. don't be afraid to just step in and cook something...
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:45 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
(In my Rodney Dangerfield voice) No respect, I tell you. I get no respect! My Hungarian Grandma must be smiling down when she hears how much you like the dish. When I was little, she boiled up some broad egg noodles, drained, add salt & peper & a few pats of butter; stir. Mix in cold cottage cheese & eat it while the noodles are still hot (right out of the pot w a fork, while no one's looking, haha.)
Well, MY Hungarian Grandma must be standing right beside your Hungarian Grandma! LOL And yes, your description is perfect and I believe I even ate them straight out of the pot! LOL AND, no one was looking!!!
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Old 11-27-2007, 11:10 AM   #33
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And I do believe MY Hungarian Grandma is standing with them (except with a beer) and saying "HA!!! I TOLD them that was a real dish!!"

My mother always said it wasn't "real" food because it had no meat or veggies.

Who needs veggies? You have pasta and cheese!
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Old 11-27-2007, 12:14 PM   #34
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You can't go wrong with soup! Rather than go to the effort of stock in your student digs, buy stock cubes and look for good soup recipes! Souffles are also easy and cheap, whatever you have heard about them! They are also quite impressive if you get to ccok for a date as every one thinks they are really hard. ;) As well as a basic cheese souflle, canned fish (tuna, salmon) with leeks, or perhaps a little spring onion and soy sauce- which you'll have for all those stir fries ;) is a delicious option and a great thing to have with salad.

Baked potatos are wonderful student food, as are stews and I'd try a basic risotto. Risi Bisi (risotto wth ham and peas) is easy, especially good if you manage to get an off cut of prociutto: the ends are usually sold cheaply, and a great way to get the taste of this expenive treat, otherwise bacon or pancetta work brilliantly too.

Chiilies are warm, sit on the stove well, and last in the fridge, and can feed people for social or study nights cheaply.

Eating well and taking the time to start cooking now will stand you in excellent stead for the rest of you life. My fiend and I had the busiest social life of our college because we could cook! GOOD FOR YOU :) Enjoy learning.
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Old 11-27-2007, 12:40 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suziquzie View Post
And I do believe MY Hungarian Grandma is standing with them (except with a beer) and saying "HA!!! I TOLD them that was a real dish!!"

My mother always said it wasn't "real" food because it had no meat or veggies.

Who needs veggies? You have pasta and cheese!
....and the Hungarians are slowly taking over..............

It might not have actual meat but it still has the protein!! Just save the veggies for the next day and eat a double salad
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Old 11-27-2007, 12:54 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
(In my Rodney Dangerfield voice) No respect, I tell you. I get no respect! My Hungarian Grandma must be smiling down when she hears how much you like the dish. When I was little, she boiled up some broad egg noodles, drained, add salt & peper & a few pats of butter; stir. Mix in cold cottage cheese & eat it while the noodles are still hot (right out of the pot w a fork, while no one's looking, haha.)
My Irish mother did this and called it stroganoff. I hate egg noodles to this day. Just the thought.
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Old 11-27-2007, 02:18 PM   #37
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If you are living in a dorm, I DO NOT recommend cooking anything with sauerkraut in it, unless you want all your dormies to cuss you out.

In fact, that was the last time I made kraut and wieners, LOL!

When you are shopping, keep an eye on the back of soup, sauce, noodle and some vegetable packages. They often have easy, fast and edible recipes on them. These are also great recipes to start with; usually they are easy to customize and change.

Another idea is to look for recipe cards in grocery stores. Walmart, the evil empire, has recipe cards in the produce and flesh sections that have yielded some decent eats.
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Old 11-27-2007, 03:23 PM   #38
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You can make your own scalloped potatoes, or use the boxed kind, and add some cooked ground beef or ham to it.

Instead of making your own chili you can make the canned kind taste more homade. Using 2 cans of chili add 1 can stewed tomatoes (with seasoning if you wish), some frozen sweet corn, a dash of chili powder, and some shredded cheese. Top with sour cream.

Fiesta Skillet Dinner- This is filling and should be enough for leftovers.
Cook about 1lb. gound hamburger. Strain off the oil and add a packet of taco seasoning mix and stir until it has coated the meat. Now stir in 1 cup uncooked instant rice, 1/2 cup water, and 2 (14oz.) cans tomatoes. If you can find the tomatoes that have the peppers and onions use that. Continue cooking until mixture comes to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer on low stirring occasionally until rice is tender (5-6 minutes). Stir in some cheddar cheese and serve with tortilla chips.

Easy Chicken A La King
In the grocery stores you can purchase a rotissarie chicken that is already cooked for you. Chop a few tablespoons of green pepper and cook in butter until tender. Blend in 1 can cream of mushroom soup, and 1/2 cup milk. Now stir in chicken and pimento. Heat and stir often. Using the microwave rice cook as instructed and serve chicken over the rice.

Hot Chicken Salad-enough for leftovers
Using the rotissarie chicken I mentioned above make this dish. Mix chicken, 3 cans cream of chicken soup, 1.5 cups mayonnaise, chopped celery, chopped onion, 1 package slivered almonds. Put into a baking dish and sprinke with crushed potato chips. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes.

Quick and Easy Corn Chowder
In pan large enough for the soup fry bacon until crisp. remove and put onto a paper towel to absorb the grease. Add 1 chopped onion, to the bacon drippins and cook until onion is tender. Stir in 1 can cream of corn, 1 can cream of mushroom soup, and 1 soup can of milk. Sprinkle with the crumbles bacon. You can buy the rounds of sourdough bread and hollow them out to serve the soup in.

Also, you can look up some fritatta recipes. Eggs are cheap and it's a great way to use any leftovers you might have.
-A frittata is a type of omelette that uses fillings such as meats, cheeses, and vegetables. Like a normal omelette, a frittata is prepared in a skillet. However, whereas a normal omelette is cooked on a stovetop and served folded, a frittata is first partially cooked on a stovetop but then finished under the grill (broiler).
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Old 11-27-2007, 07:14 PM   #39
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hi i am 18 years old and in college. i am soon to be living on my own. i am wondering if anyone can help me with cheap and easy recipes so as im not stuck eating pizza. lol any help or ideas is greatly appreciated.

THANKS A BUNCH
Hello and sorry to hear that from someone who recently graduated!

I'm assuming you've got either cable/satellite or BitTorrent? The best advice I can give is start watching Good Eats on Food Network. It'll give you a grounding in food that'll serve you all the rest of your days. How to buy it, how to season it, how to cook it, how to enjoy it. Great for impressing a date and stretching your own budget. Once you've got that grounding, you'll be able to knock out everything from mindblowingly good and cheap ramen or chili, to gourmet fare fit for a five-star restaurant.

A wok is absolutely the one cooking vessel to have because you can cook ANYTHING in one, if you have to. You'll want a 4-quart and an 8-quart stock pot as well once you can afford them. A couple inexpensive cast-iron skillets from the hardware store would round out the most basic college cookware set.

FYI, NEVER EVER use steel wool on a non-stick piece of cookware (the ones with the black coating inside). I've lost good pots because of roommates doing that.
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:17 PM   #40
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thanks ofor the info i cant wait to start sounds like fuun
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