"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-27-2011, 10:01 AM   #1
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,296
ISO converting pan size

I want to make a cupcake recipe but I want to use the mini cupcake size. How do I figure out the time needed to bake the mini cupcakes?
__________________

__________________
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2011, 10:20 AM   #2
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 108
I would start checking them using the toothpick method about half way through the time suggested.

When the toothpick comes out clean then they are done.
__________________

__________________
Two things make every meal better. Pork Fat and Carbonation. It's that simple.
Dumpandstir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2011, 09:51 AM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,296
That would be the "by guess and by golly" method. Since baking involves chemistry, I guess I was thinking "spreadsheet, equation, table" where one could plug in the new pan/muffin paper size and get the percentage by which to reduce or increase the time based on the change in the mass. Kinda like an online converter where you can convert baking times rather than measurements <g>. It would seem that linear heat transfer equation might work. The recipe I wanted to try has a baking time of 23 minutes. Using an LHT equation, the baking time to raise the center temperature to approx. 190 degrees would be between 8 and 16 minutes. I'm guessing the cooking time will be between 14-16 minutes. If anyone knows of such a spreadsheet...I looked on the Internet (maybe I didn't put in the right keywords), a link to the same would be appreciated.
__________________
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2011, 12:42 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,228
While it is probably mathematically possible to figure out the time involved to heat a given mass to a specified temperature with a given temperature input. I would guess that there are too many variables to arrive at a meaningful answer. I would go with the toothpick method.
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2011, 12:46 PM   #5
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,344
I'd bet there is a fixed relationship between the cooking times for a mini cupcake size vs. standard or large cupcake sizes with the same recipe.

I think your best bet is to experiment and make notes. Buy some cake mixes on sale and donate the results to the local senior center. You'll have your info and make a lot of people happy at the same time.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2011, 12:50 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,296
Interestingly enough, there are several articles in peer-reviewed domestic and international journals on this (the ones I read this a.m. had to do with bread). That's enough to peak the curiosity of my DH--nothing like a problem grounded in the laws of physics for which he can tweak an equation to get his brain churning. Especially if he might be able to "spin" an article for a journal out of it. Some people's ideas of "fun" are different from others <g>.

Have to say, one of my pet peeves is a cake recipe that saws "can also be used to make cupcakes" but doesn't even hint at the time it takes for cupcakes...
__________________
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2011, 12:55 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I'd bet there is a fixed relationship between the cooking times for a mini cupcake size vs. standard or large cupcake sizes with the same recipe.

I think your best bet is to experiment and make notes. Buy some cake mixes on sale and donate the results to the local senior center. You'll have your info and make a lot of people happy at the same time.
There definitely is. The spatial area of the mini-cupcake is about 2/3rds that of the large size. The result for the equation for LHT is about 2/3rds that of the large size--the flex would be 1/3 to 2/3 of the cooking time for the large size. Of course, what the equation can't factor in is temperature fluctuation if you open the door or if your oven thermostat is funky or the size of the oven (large vs. small).
__________________
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2011, 01:26 PM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
...Of course, what the equation can't factor in is temperature fluctuation if you open the door or if your oven thermostat is funky or the size of the oven (large vs. small).

All baking recipes have to deal with the variables you mention and more, not just converted ones. Posted times are always to be taken as guidelines. Individual results may vary.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2011, 01:38 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
I still don't see what's wrong with using a toothpick. The principle of transmitting a given value of heat to the core of the batter of a cake or a cupcake so it can rise and solidify is the same. By my measure, the thickness of a single layer in a cake pan is very close to that of a cup cake, and since the heat is transmitted through the minor dimension of both, the time should be about the same. That's where the toothpick comes in. At the baking time the cake is due is when I would test the cupcakes for doneness. Adding 3 minutes at a time once or twice should complete the process.

No muss... no Pythagorean theorems... no headache trying to calculate the surface of a sphere... just meeting the everyday challenges of baking with tried and true techniques.
__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2011, 02:08 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,873
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
I still don't see what's wrong with using a toothpick. The principle of transmitting a given value of heat to the core of the batter of a cake or a cupcake so it can rise and solidify is the same. By my measure, the thickness of a single layer in a cake pan is very close to that of a cup cake, and since the heat is transmitted through the minor dimension of both, the time should be about the same. That's where the toothpick comes in. At the baking time the cake is due is when I would test the cupcakes for doneness. Adding 3 minutes at a time once or twice should complete the process.

No muss... no Pythagorean theorems... no headache trying to calculate the surface of a sphere... just meeting the everyday challenges of baking with tried and true techniques.
But some of us like mathematical calculations.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.