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Old 03-26-2011, 11:22 AM   #11
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I've done both, cold/cold and hot/cold. I don't notice any difference in the stick/no stick either. And I too think Zereh's post pretty much nailed it.
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:24 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post

Hot pan, cold oil is the same as searing meat seals in the juices.

Searing meat doesn't "seal" in it's juices.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:43 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Searing meat doesn't "seal" in it's juices.
I think that is his point.
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Old 03-28-2011, 02:46 AM   #14
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i'm with Zereh's post all the way.

The cold oil thing is bull. I keep my oil at room temp in a squeeze bottle. add the oil to my pan, turn on the burner and let the oil heat up. Once my oil is hot, i toss in my food and cook away.
you will have little bits of stuck stuff here and there...more often then not, that is the good stuff..
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Old 03-28-2011, 09:21 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Searing meat doesn't "seal" in it's juices.
That is what I was saying.
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Old 03-28-2011, 09:53 AM   #16
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I need to get some new pans and I'm debating on whether to get stainless steel or Teflon. Any suggestions? Has anyone tried those ceramic nonstick pans you see in infomercials?
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Old 03-28-2011, 10:10 AM   #17
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I have mostly tri-ply SS pans. So it's no surprise I think they're the best. For the most part, Teflon pans aren't necessary. They are very good for cooking eggs and a few other things. Otherwise, SS tri-ply is your best bet for all around cooking.

It's also useful to have a cast iron skillet, a teflon 8" to 10" skillet and a heavy Dutch oven such as LeCrueset.
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Old 03-28-2011, 10:17 AM   #18
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I do have a couple cast iron pans, and I really like them for some things, but they are so heavy! Not really my favorite all purpose pan. My reservation about Teflon is that it is so easily scratched. SS seems like it would be sooooo much more durable. And with these tips I think I would be fine with it
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Old 03-28-2011, 10:29 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
I need to get some new pans and I'm debating on whether to get stainless steel or Teflon. Any suggestions?...
Non-stick won't give you any of the little super tasty bits (fond) that come from browning meats and left behind stuck to the bottom of the pan when it comes time to make your sauce or gravy.

I have both non-stick, cast iron and stainless steel in 10" pans (a size I prefer), depending on what it is that I intend to cook.
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Old 03-28-2011, 10:35 AM   #20
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I've got all three, too, CI, SS and non-stick. It all depends on what I am cooking as to which one I grab. Just like it all depends on what needs hittin' as to which hammer I grab.
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