"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-23-2012, 02:34 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Unfortunately my Internet connection is not good enough to support video. I expect to have a decent connection later this year.

Yeah I knew about the buttermilk substitute. And also the well known substitute to add a T of vinegar to a C of milk.

Would you care to have me watch it again and write it down for you?
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 02:41 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
First, let me say that all my children are now in their 40's and I've had this recipe since they were toddlers. It is, by far, the best fried chicken recipe I've ever made and I have lots of recipes for fried chicken we all like.
That recipe looks good! I've saved it to try it some time.
__________________

__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 05:24 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
To get the recipe you do have to watch the video with pencil and paper in hand to write the recipe down. They do give the full recipe with all the directions. And if you can't find buttermilk, there is a product called "Saco Cultured Buttermilk" and you can find it in the baking section of your supermarket. It is in a yellow container and usually stocked on the top shelf. Before you start to do anything else, make up the amount or even a little extra. It needs time to blend in the liquid.

I live up north and buttermilk is not an item that is found in any store. So I use the powder version all the time with no problems. Down south, they probably sell more butter milk in quart containers than regular milk. This is an excellent recipe.
Yeah in just about every grocery store here, you have your choice of 2-3 varieties. I usually get the full fat buttermilk, makes really nice baked goods.
__________________
I'm Bloggin'

http://bakingbetter.com
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 07:04 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Would you care to have me watch it again and write it down for you?
Oh you're so darned nice! But thank you no, that's too much to ask of anyone and I'm more interested out of idle curiosity than seriously considering cooking their recipe.

Anyway the Crisco recipe looks pretty good and I'm going to try that one next time I do fried chicken.

I usually bake my "fried" chicken anyway. Frying in oil makes too big a mess and wastes too much oil by the time I factor in the small amount I'd make. If I ever win the lottery I'll get a small restaurant sized kitchen put in, and have a housekeeper to clean up my messes.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 08:41 PM   #15
Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
First, let me say that all my children are now in their 40's and I've had this recipe since they were toddlers. It is, by far, the best fried chicken recipe I've ever made and I have lots of recipes for fried chicken we all like.

Except....when they asked for "The Colonel's chicken" I knew they meant the recipe in the link. It is soooo crunchy and moist and delicious. Yum. You can tell, I sort of recommend it.

I made it for my new husband a couple of weeks ago and I didn't think he was going to stop eating it. He's a real southern boy and likes his fried chicken.
That looks yummy! Fried chicken is one of the things I have not been able to master. Keeping my heat even, blah blah. Everyone swears by the cast iron skillet, but I can't seem to make it without a super dark spot in the middle of each piece. Alton claims that is 'good eats', but it always just tastes a bit burnt to me.

My other problem is even when I get everything right, the crust seems to fall right off when you take a bite. Katie, with this recipe, does the breading stick? I am always wary of the 'double-dip', it seems to make a super thick crust that tastes, I don't know, flour'y if you know what I mean.
__________________
lisaluvstocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 09:31 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisaluvstocook View Post
That looks yummy! Fried chicken is one of the things I have not been able to master. Keeping my heat even, blah blah. Everyone swears by the cast iron skillet, but I can't seem to make it without a super dark spot in the middle of each piece. Alton claims that is 'good eats', but it always just tastes a bit burnt to me.

My other problem is even when I get everything right, the crust seems to fall right off when you take a bite. Katie, with this recipe, does the breading stick? I am always wary of the 'double-dip', it seems to make a super thick crust that tastes, I don't know, flour'y if you know what I mean.
From the first time making this chicken, I've never had a problem with the breading coming off. Yes, this does make an extra-thick crust but it in no way tastes floury.

The one thing I would recommend, from experience, is to place the freshly-cooked pieces on a wire rack (placed over a tray or platter to catch any oily drips). This helps to keep the outside crispy.

My only recommendation is to follow the instructions exactly as written, which is how I have been doing for many, many years...with awesome success.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 09:49 PM   #17
Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 53
Thank you Katie, I appreciate the feedback. I always drain on a wire rack, I learned that trick young, nothing like picking up a piece of fried goodness and finding a soggy, greasy bottom. Yuck. I have had thick crusts that I liked, but I also appreciate a lighter breading, thin and crunchy. Too many options!
__________________
lisaluvstocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 10:34 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisaluvstocook View Post
That looks yummy! Fried chicken is one of the things I have not been able to master. Keeping my heat even, blah blah. Everyone swears by the cast iron skillet, but I can't seem to make it without a super dark spot in the middle of each piece. Alton claims that is 'good eats', but it always just tastes a bit burnt to me.
Are you pan frying or deep frying? I'm assuming here that the recipe needs deep fat to work well. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2012, 12:33 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
First, let me say that all my children are now in their 40's and I've had this recipe since they were toddlers. It is, by far, the best fried chicken recipe I've ever made and I have lots of recipes for fried chicken we all like...
It took me a good long while to learn to make crunchy fried chicken. And, contrary to popular belief, you don't need a pressure fryer, or special equipment. A good heavy pan with high sides, cooking oil, and a good recipe are all you need.

I make my crunchy fried chicken the same way as is done in Katie's recipe. The secret to this is that the chicken is patted dry before coating with the seasoned flour. The flour sticks to the chicken, which allows the thick batter to stick as well. Then, when the chicken is put into 2 to 3 inches of hot oil, the batter remains on the chicken and fries up crispy and delicious. The only difference between my crunchy chicken and Katie's is that I use more seasonings in both my seasoned flour, and batter. I also fry the chicken until the crust is medium brown, and then place it into a 375' F. oven for 20 minutes more. This makes sure that it is cooked through, without drying it out.

Here's my recipe for seasoned flour. Like Katie's, my family loves it.

Chief Longwind's Fried Chicken:
Ingredients:
Cut up chicken for as many people as you need.

1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt (for extra flavor, replace the salt with a great chicken soup base)
1/2 tsp. granulated garlic powder
1/8 tsp. powdered ginger
1/2 tsp. marjoram
1/4 tsp. rubbed sage
1/4 tsp. ground thyme
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1/4 tsp. tumeric
1/8 tsp. red pepper (cayenne pepper)
1 dash Chinese 5-spice powder
1/8 tsp. celery seed
1/4 tsp. granulated onion powder

Batter:
1 1/2 cups ap flour
1 cup water
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp. rubbed sage
1 tsp. black pepper
1/2 tsp. red pepper (cayenne pepper)
1 large egg.

Enough oil to fill a heavy frying pan 3 inches deep.

Combine the seasoned flour ingredients in a 1 gallon plastic freezer bag.
Whisk together the batter ingredients in a large bowl. Heat the oil in the pan to 360' F. Preheat the oven to 375' .

Place the chicken into the freezer bag and shake until it's well coated. Remove the chicken pieces onto a cooling rack for five minutes. Dip the chicken into the batter and place in the hot oil. Don't put so many pieces in so as to crown the pan.

Brown the chicken on all sides to a medium brown. Place onto a parchment paper lined cookie sheet. Put the chicken into the oven and bake for 20 minutes. Serve with your favorite sides and a glass of my new, favorite citrus punch.

Citrus Punch
2 blood oranges, peeled
Juice of 1 lemon
juice of 1 lime
4 tbs. plain yogurt
4 cups ice water
sugar or sweetener to taste

Blend it up, and serve in chilled glasses.

Alternately, blend only the fruit, yogurt, and sweetener. Divide equal portions into four chilled glasses. Fill glasses with sparkling water.

For a lighter coating, omit the batter. Shake the chicken in the seasoned flour, dip in egg wash, and again into the seasoned flour. Fry and bake as before.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chicken

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.