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Old 08-22-2013, 07:02 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
It does if you already have a stock pot but not a pasta pot
Okay, gotcha.

I pull the insert out, then tilt it and let it drain into the pot I just pulled it out of.
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:04 PM   #42
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What is the difference between stock and broth?
In our family stock is the liquid you add when cooking a dish or making gravy or soup, while broth is a "thin" soup rather like consommé (sorry, can't do an accent over the "e" on this keyboard) but with "bits" in it (vegetables, meat, etc.) Mind you, that begs the question of Scotch Broth which is a thick soup.

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Old 08-22-2013, 09:14 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
As Chief said, there are several answers. Mine is this.

Stock is made with bones and meat scraps seasoned or not with some aromatic veggies etc. Broth is made without bones, just meats and/or veggies, seasoned or not.

By this definition, you cannot have vegetable stock, just broth.
This is the definition used in culinary school.

I have poached chicken breasts in water with thyme, parsley stems, peppercorns and a bay leaf for just 20 minutes or so, to use for chicken salad. Then I strain the seasonings and save the broth for making rice.
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Old 08-22-2013, 11:36 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Just curious; isn't a sauce, that's been concentrated by boiling away water, called a reduction?

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Can be. Are you thinking of demi glace?
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Old 08-23-2013, 07:36 AM   #45
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Can be. Are you thinking of demi glace?
Yes, but with more than just beef. Turkey, chicken, ham, pork, even fish (fume' anyone?) can all be made into wonderful stocks, and then into so many more things. A reduction of turkey stock makes a wonderful base liquid for a home made turkey pot pie, for instance.

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Old 08-23-2013, 11:33 AM   #46
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I have two different size pots with pasta inserts. I only use the inserts for steaming (usually tamales because I don't like steamed veg) because it requires way too much water to fill either of the pots enough to cover the insert and up the side to have enough water to boil the pasta.

Then when you pull the insert out, you have a piece of dripping hot metal to put down somewhere. Then you need another pot to strain the liquid into. Maybe CG has worked out a better method, but it doesn't work for me.

I have a few different sizes, also, but none with a pasta insert. I think that would work well when I'm making chicken stock for soup. Much better than trying to fish everything out of it. I can never have too many utensils or pots and pans. I don't know why I held off so long on a pasta pot!

Now that I know NOT to let the stock boil, I am going to try again come winter, and soup weather. No more dirty dish water! LOL
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Old 08-23-2013, 11:41 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I have two different size pots with pasta inserts. I only use the inserts for steaming (usually tamales because I don't like steamed veg) because it requires way too much water to fill either of the pots enough to cover the insert and up the side to have enough water to boil the pasta.

Then when you pull the insert out, you have a piece of dripping hot metal to put down somewhere. Then you need another pot to strain the liquid into. Maybe CG has worked out a better method, but it doesn't work for me.
I agree with GG that it takes too much water for making pasta. It also takes more water to make stock. I don't use it when making smaller amounts of stock - that can double the amount of water needed, then I have to reduce the stock more. That makes enough extra work and time to lose any advantages.
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Old 08-23-2013, 11:43 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by CarolPa View Post
I have a few different sizes, also, but none with a pasta insert. I think that would work well when I'm making chicken stock for soup. Much better than trying to fish everything out of it. I can never have too many utensils or pots and pans. I don't know why I held off so long on a pasta pot!

Now that I know NOT to let the stock boil, I am going to try again come winter, and soup weather. No more dirty dish water! LOL
No need to wait till winter I have a few quarts of chicken broth or stock I've made over the last few months that I just stick in the freezer, so it's ready when I want to make that first pot of soup. Sometimes I use it for making rice or a sauce as well.
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Old 11-04-2013, 09:26 AM   #49
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And that's why egg whites are used to clarify stock.

How do I do this?
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Old 11-04-2013, 10:12 AM   #50
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How do I do this?
This = Elements: The Consommé | Michael Ruhlman is a wonderful explanation and technique for clarifying stock. I couldn't improve on this man's tutorial if I worked on it for a day and a half.

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