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Old 11-04-2013, 10:41 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
This = Elements: The Consommé | Michael Ruhlman is a wonderful explanation and technique for clarifying stock. I couldn't improve on this man's tutorial if I worked on it for a day and a half.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

So, to make sure I understand, I make my chicken stock from whatever recipe I use, and then use this method to clarify it after it's finished. Is that right?
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Old 11-04-2013, 10:59 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by CarolPa View Post
So, to make sure I understand, I make my chicken stock from whatever recipe I use, and then use this method to clarify it after it's finished. Is that right?
Yes.
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Old 11-04-2013, 12:24 PM   #53
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Excellent discussion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldvine View Post
In my kitchen, I'm the boss. That Wolf stove is on high, when the pot starts to boil, it gets turned down low to a simmer.
I understand Wolf makes one of the best gas ranges you can buy. Jeff Smith "frugal gourmet" used one on his show.
Looked very nice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I'm going to go against the consensus here and agree with Jenny that you should not boil stock. In fact, when I make stock (which is on a regular basis), I barely let it come to a simmer and leave it that way for 6 hours or longer. Not even a full simmer, but occasional bubbles. And while we're on the subject, I don't stir it, either. I was taught many years ago by a friend who is a trained chef in Las Vegas that boiling and stirring stock traps the grease. By keeping the activity to a bare minimum all the fat will stay on top, where it can be easily skimmed off, resulting in a cleaner end product.
I have never paid this much attention to a giant pot of simmering bones and veggies before. But I do complement you wanting things perfect.
I just throw everthing into the stock pot, fill with water, bring to rolling boil, then I turn it down to low and let it simmer (bubbling simmer) for 2-3 hours. Cool, Strain, de-fat and store in small containers in freezer until needed.
I use it all the time.

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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
And that's why egg whites are used to clarify stock.
This interests me!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I too place my stock in the fridge. The fat separates from the water and solidifies on top. I simply remove the sold mass of fat and discard it,, or use it to help light the grill.
Chief. How do you use the renderings as fire starter? I know it will burn, but how do you use it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I have the giant porch freezer too. Isn't it handy?
Chief. Is the porch heated? I have a chest freezer in my basement and was told that under 50º F, the freezer may not operate correctly?
But, I have also seen outdoor freezers in Alaska (on TV) and wondered who is off their rocker? Or are there freezers that work in the low temps?
I mean the ambient temp in many cases could be much lower than the freezer temp. I am asking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
And I use CG's shortcut when making stock. My stockpot has an insert like the one in a pasta pot.
What a delightful idea. I like it and will implement an insert next time I make stock.
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Old 11-04-2013, 01:26 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Excellent discussion...

Chief. How do you use the renderings as fire starter? I know it will burn, but how do you use it?

Roll_Bones; First, I like your online moniker. It reminds me of a short story by Harlan Ellison called "Gonna Roll The Bones" I wonder how many people realize that to "roll the bones" means to throw the dice.

But to answer your question, I save my used cooking oil in a large jar. After cooking some kind of meat where fat is rendered out during the cooking, I simply empty the hot, liquid fat to the jar of used cooking oil. But if I'm going to save the fat, to use for cooking, I'll pour it into a pot of boiling water. I then turn off the stove, pour the water into a suitable container, and refrigerate it. When cold, I lift off the solid, mostly clean fat, and put it into a bowl. I then nuke it, or remelt it in a clean pan, then carefully pour it through a paper towel and into a clean jar for storage in the fridge.

The fat that was mixed into the used cooking oil is poured over crumpled newspaper and left to soak in. The paper is already in the bottom of my Webber kettle, under the charcoal grate. I put the charcoal on the grate and light the paper. The fat-saturated paper burns long enough to completely ignite the charcoal, or wood. By the time I have the food prepared to go on the fire, the fire is ready. This is a fast way to light the charcoal, and leaves no petroleum taste on the food. It also saves me from having to dispose of used cooking-oil/excess fat.

Chief. Is the porch heated? I have a chest freezer in my basement and was told that under 50º F, the freezer may not operate correctly?
But, I have also seen outdoor freezers in Alaska (on TV) and wondered who is off their rocker? Or are there freezers that work in the low temps?
I mean the ambient temp in many cases could be much lower than the freezer temp. I am asking.


I have a small porch that is simply stairs, railing, and a roof, all in front of my entry door. My outside fridge is simply the outside air, especially in the 40 something temps of autumn and fall. It allows me to chill food quickly, and without having to use electricity. My deep freeze is in my basement too.

In the winter, I often use the outside air to freeze things before I put them into the freezer. Sometimes, I use the car as my fridge or freezer, to keep critters away from things that might attract them. I always use metal, covered containers to maximize temperature transfer, and a rack to allow air to flow all around the container.

The advantage of using the outside air, is that it takes up no space in my fridge, and allows me to chill large amounts of food for holiday get togethers. It's great for chilling beverages. It's a pretty common practice in my part of the world.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-04-2013, 02:33 PM   #55
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Hmmm. I remember back in the 50's my parents rented out a small apartment on the second floor of our home. One young couple moved in during the winter and didn't have a refrigerator. They put a wooden box out on the porch roof and kept their perishibles in that box until they could get a small used fridge. That was the only time I've seen that done, but it is a very good idea! Also, storing things in your car. I guess a shed would work, too. My husband puts pies on the porch to cool but I'm always afraid a critter will come and get them.
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Old 11-04-2013, 02:58 PM   #56
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I love a good sale on milk in the winter. I can keep it on the porch or in the car, bringing it in as I need it. That's why last winter was so disappointing for temps, it was too warm to count on my outside freezer.
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Old 11-04-2013, 03:52 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Chief. How do you use the renderings as fire starter? I know it will burn, but how do you use it?

Roll_Bones; First, I like your online moniker. It reminds me of a short story by Harlan Ellison called "Gonna Roll The Bones" I wonder how many people realize that to "roll the bones" means to throw the dice.

But to answer your question, I save my used cooking oil in a large jar. After cooking some kind of meat where fat is rendered out during the cooking, I simply empty the hot, liquid fat to the jar of used cooking oil. But if I'm going to save the fat, to use for cooking, I'll pour it into a pot of boiling water. I then turn off the stove, pour the water into a suitable container, and refrigerate it. When cold, I lift off the solid, mostly clean fat, and put it into a bowl. I then nuke it, or remelt it in a clean pan, then carefully pour it through a paper towel and into a clean jar for storage in the fridge.

The fat that was mixed into the used cooking oil is poured over crumpled newspaper and left to soak in. The paper is already in the bottom of my Webber kettle, under the charcoal grate. I put the charcoal on the grate and light the paper. The fat-saturated paper burns long enough to completely ignite the charcoal, or wood. By the time I have the food prepared to go on the fire, the fire is ready. This is a fast way to light the charcoal, and leaves no petroleum taste on the food. It also saves me from having to dispose of used cooking-oil/excess fat.

Chief. Is the porch heated? I have a chest freezer in my basement and was told that under 50º F, the freezer may not operate correctly?
But, I have also seen outdoor freezers in Alaska (on TV) and wondered who is off their rocker? Or are there freezers that work in the low temps?
I mean the ambient temp in many cases could be much lower than the freezer temp. I am asking.


I have a small porch that is simply stairs, railing, and a roof, all in front of my entry door. My outside fridge is simply the outside air, especially in the 40 something temps of autumn and fall. It allows me to chill food quickly, and without having to use electricity. My deep freeze is in my basement too.

In the winter, I often use the outside air to freeze things before I put them into the freezer. Sometimes, I use the car as my fridge or freezer, to keep critters away from things that might attract them. I always use metal, covered containers to maximize temperature transfer, and a rack to allow air to flow all around the container.

The advantage of using the outside air, is that it takes up no space in my fridge, and allows me to chill large amounts of food for holiday get togethers. It's great for chilling beverages. It's a pretty common practice in my part of the world.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Thanks for the clarification on the outdoor freezer.

I see about starting the fire. I use a chimney starter with newspaper. And I do add a couple drops of oil to the newspaper before I light it. The oil helps it out and does a better job than just dry newspaper. Especially when there is no breeze.

My screen name comes from my favorite band. "Rush". They have a song called "Roll the Bones".

No Youtube function on this forum?
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Old 11-04-2013, 03:58 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Thanks for the clarification on the outdoor freezer.

I see about starting the fire. I use a chimney starter with newspaper. And I do add a couple drops of oil to the newspaper before I light it. The oil helps it out and does a better job than just dry newspaper. Especially when there is no breeze.

My screen name comes from my favorite band. "Rush". They have a song called "Roll the Bones".

No Youtube function on this forum?
Like this?



It's so simple it took me a while to figure out. Find the video you want to post. Copy and paste the URL of the video into your Post. Not as a photo or as a link. Just plain pasted into the message.
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Old 11-04-2013, 04:16 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
I love a good sale on milk in the winter. I can keep it on the porch or in the car, bringing it in as I need it. That's why last winter was so disappointing for temps, it was too warm to count on my outside freezer.
This reminds me of the Christmas we had hordes to feed and there was no room in the 'fridge for the turkey to defrost. It spent 24 hours in the boot of my car!
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Old 11-04-2013, 04:21 PM   #60
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This reminds me of the Christmas we had hordes to feed and there was no room in the 'fridge for the turkey to defrost. It spent 24 hours in the boot of my car!
For PF, me, and a number of others here, that wouldn't work - too cold outside.
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