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Old 08-19-2013, 11:41 AM   #1
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ISO - Help Making Stock

First attempt making stock. The rec. says to bring to simmer on low ....let it cook for along while. Question .....will it eventually simmer on that setting? I am thinking it will but might take 4 ever? Its a good big pot of stock i have. It says in bold do not BTAB . Wanted to ask before I started.

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Old 08-19-2013, 11:50 AM   #2
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hmmmm. I wouldn't worry too much. You have to get it up to temp. I suppose it will start to simmer eventually at a lower temp if you have the time to watch it. I just crank it, stir it occasionally to prevent stuff from sticking to the bottom, and then turn it down when it starts to roll...
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Old 08-19-2013, 12:28 PM   #3
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hmmmm. I wouldn't worry too much. You have to get it up to temp. I suppose it will start to simmer eventually at a lower temp if you have the time to watch it. I just crank it, stir it occasionally to prevent stuff from sticking to the bottom, and then turn it down when it starts to roll...
This is what I do as well. I see no reason to try to get the pot to a simmer using only low heat. It could take hours to get to simmer - a complete waste of time that doesn't produce a better end result.
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Old 08-19-2013, 12:29 PM   #4
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First attempt making stock. The rec. says to bring to simmer on low ....let it cook for along while. Question .....will it eventually simmer on that setting? I am thinking it will but might take 4 ever? Its a good big pot of stock i have. It says in bold do not BTAB . Wanted to ask before I started.
I assume that BTAB means "bring to a boil"? How odd. I would have thought it better to bring it up to temp fairly quickly and then, when it starts to simmer, turn down to a setting which maintains the temperature
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Old 08-19-2013, 01:01 PM   #5
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Mad Cook, crank the heat up to get it almost to boiling, and then turn it down.. And if it does boil--no worries, really. Your stock might not be crystal clear, but it will be delicious.
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Old 08-19-2013, 01:42 PM   #6
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In my kitchen, I'm the boss. That Wolf stove is on high, when the pot starts to boil, it gets turned down low to a simmer.
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Old 08-19-2013, 09:46 PM   #7
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Bring it to a near boil and then lower it to a very gentle simmer.

Never boil your stock for more than a minute. Impurities and fat get emulsified making the finished product cloudy and greasy.
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Old 08-20-2013, 08:07 AM   #8
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Bring it to a near boil and then lower it to a very gentle simmer.

Never boil your stock for more than a minute. Impurities and fat get emulsified making the finished product cloudy and greasy.
That's what an egg float is used for, to clarify the stock. But the op isn't looking for consume, but tather, stock. It's ok if it's a bit cloudy. I don't mind cloudy. I can clarify it later if need be. Besides, cloudy make better gravy, IMHO. The particulates add to the gravy color and texture.

Other than that, I agree 200% with what everyone else said.

If you are making a chicken stock, start by roasting the bones to add color and develop flavor. The more skins and bones you have, the better. Crack the bones to help release the marrow flavor and nutrients. Chicken wings, lots of them, help develop a rich flavor and texture as well as does the carcass. After the stock is done, remove the skin and bones. REduce by half to concentrate the flavor. This allows you to use less space in canning as well, as you need less stock in a recipe to get that rich chicken flavor.

Of course, this works for all kinds of fowl, fish, and pretty much, all meats.

Seeeeeya'; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-20-2013, 10:59 AM   #9
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I'm going to go against the consensus here and agree with Jenny that you should not boil stock. In fact, when I make stock (which is on a regular basis), I barely let it come to a simmer and leave it that way for 6 hours or longer. Not even a full simmer, but occasional bubbles. And while we're on the subject, I don't stir it, either. I was taught many years ago by a friend who is a trained chef in Las Vegas that boiling and stirring stock traps the grease. By keeping the activity to a bare minimum all the fat will stay on top, where it can be easily skimmed off, resulting in a cleaner end product.
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Old 08-20-2013, 11:00 AM   #10
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Bring it to a near boil and then lower it to a very gentle simmer.

Never boil your stock for more than a minute. Impurities and fat get emulsified making the finished product cloudy and greasy.

So that's why my chicken soup looks like dirty dishwater!!!
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