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Old 05-09-2011, 10:23 AM   #11
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Sure you can fry without coating in flour, chicken wings are done all the time that way. Just season the chicken like you want before adding to the pan.
But yes, hot oil and a little splatter go hand in hand.
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Old 05-09-2011, 12:13 PM   #12
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T%his won't give you whole chicken pieces, but will help eliminate splatter, and give you a very tasty chicken technique to work with.

The technique is called velvetize and will work equally well with chicken, pork, and beef. Remove the meat from the bones and cut into thin strips, like bacon is sliced. Mix together 1 egg with 2 tbs of good soy sauce, and a little ground pepper. Place 1/2 cup of cornstarch into a shaker bag (plastic zipper bags work great for this purpose). Place the the meat strips into the egg mixture and let sit for 1/2 hour in the fridge. Heat 2 inches of oil in a frying pan, but only to about 250'F. Use a thermometer to get the temperature right. When the oil is the proper temperature, place the chicken strips into the bag with the cornstarch and shake until all is well coated. Remove the strips and place into the oil. You should not see bubbles as if it were frying. You are poaching the meat. Leave the meat in the hot oil until the cornstarch turns whitish-gray in color, then remove from the pan. use this chicken in Asian dishes such as stir fry, or Chicken with stir-fried veggies and a sesame sauce, or with a light barbecue sauce, or Cantonese style Chinese food, or in any way you can think of.

Velvetized meat, be it chicken, pork, or beef, is very versatile, and super tender. Hope this helps you.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 05-09-2011, 12:37 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
T%his won't give you whole chicken pieces, but will help eliminate splatter, and give you a very tasty chicken technique to work with.

The technique is called velvetize and will work equally well with chicken, pork, and beef. Remove the meat from the bones and cut into thin strips, like bacon is sliced. Mix together 1 egg with 2 tbs of good soy sauce, and a little ground pepper. Place 1/2 cup of cornstarch into a shaker bag (plastic zipper bags work great for this purpose). Place the the meat strips into the egg mixture and let sit for 1/2 hour in the fridge. Heat 2 inches of oil in a frying pan, but only to about 250'F. Use a thermometer to get the temperature right. When the oil is the proper temperature, place the chicken strips into the bag with the cornstarch and shake until all is well coated. Remove the strips and place into the oil. You should not see bubbles as if it were frying. You are poaching the meat. Leave the meat in the hot oil until the cornstarch turns whitish-gray in color, then remove from the pan. use this chicken in Asian dishes such as stir fry, or Chicken with stir-fried veggies and a sesame sauce, or with a light barbecue sauce, or Cantonese style Chinese food, or in any way you can think of.

Velvetized meat, be it chicken, pork, or beef, is very versatile, and super tender. Hope this helps you.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Sounds very interesting. Can something be substituted for the soy sauce, e.g., Worcestershire? (I'm not supposed to have soy.)
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Old 05-09-2011, 01:00 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Sure you can fry without coating in flour, chicken wings are done all the time that way. Just season the chicken like you want before adding to the pan.
But yes, hot oil and a little splatter go hand in hand.
thanks! thats what i did and encountered hot oil that made few major splashes
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Old 05-09-2011, 01:04 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
T%his won't give you whole chicken pieces, but will help eliminate splatter, and give you a very tasty chicken technique to work with.

The technique is called velvetize and will work equally well with chicken, pork, and beef. Remove the meat from the bones and cut into thin strips, like bacon is sliced. Mix together 1 egg with 2 tbs of good soy sauce, and a little ground pepper. Place 1/2 cup of cornstarch into a shaker bag (plastic zipper bags work great for this purpose). Place the the meat strips into the egg mixture and let sit for 1/2 hour in the fridge. Heat 2 inches of oil in a frying pan, but only to about 250'F. Use a thermometer to get the temperature right. When the oil is the proper temperature, place the chicken strips into the bag with the cornstarch and shake until all is well coated. Remove the strips and place into the oil. You should not see bubbles as if it were frying. You are poaching the meat. Leave the meat in the hot oil until the cornstarch turns whitish-gray in color, then remove from the pan. use this chicken in Asian dishes such as stir fry, or Chicken with stir-fried veggies and a sesame sauce, or with a light barbecue sauce, or Cantonese style Chinese food, or in any way you can think of.

Velvetized meat, be it chicken, pork, or beef, is very versatile, and super tender. Hope this helps you.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

thanks! i don't personally like stir fry because of the sauses Asian dishes use which contain unhealthy ingridients. cornstarch and egg adds calories. i was looking for straightforward answer actually from whomever also fries like chicken legs and stuff.
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Old 05-09-2011, 01:22 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by mommyNY2 View Post
thanks! i don't personally like stir fry because of the sauses Asian dishes use which contain unhealthy ingridients. cornstarch and egg adds calories. i was looking for straightforward answer actually from whomever also fries like chicken legs and stuff.
Sounds to me like you are on a high protein diet, like the Atkins diet. Remember that we are omnivores, and that yes, starches like cornstarch and flour add calories. But so do fats and meats. Nuts also have high nutritional value, but contain a significant amount of fat. After years of research, and speaking with nutritionists, I've come to realize that any one thing, eaten in excess is bad for the body. Fats are a required food, but in moderation. They are very high in caloric content, as are processed starches such as white flour and cornstarch. Potatoes are high in starches and will also spike the blood sugar.

The body is a complex machine that requires a whole bunch of different nutrients. Grains supply most of them. Fruits, especially those that grow outside the tropical regions are very healthy to consume. Grapes and oranges, even grapefruit, mangoes, papay, bananas, etc., have nutritional value but are very high in natural sugars. These must be eaten sparingly.

Sweet potatoes are listed as one of the "super" foods, as are blueberries, cranberries, raspberries, etc.

The phrase; all things in moderation, is a natural law of nature. Of equal importance is eating a wide range of foods, as each contributes in ways that are specific to them.

It really doesn't hurt to enjoy something like a piece of flour-coated fried chicken once in a while. Just don't make it a habit. If you want great tasting chicken that doesn't use flour, try marinating in a spicy sauce, then grilling, broiling, or baking it.

Good luck in your search for the perfect technique. I hope you find it. If you want, I have a recipe that uses no flour, or staches of any kind, and no eggs as all. And the spicy heat is just right. But your will need to either bake this chicken, or cook it on over charcoal.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 05-09-2011, 01:45 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Sounds to me like you are on a high protein diet, like the Atkins diet. Remember that we are omnivores, and that yes, starches like cornstarch and flour add calories. But so do fats and meats. Nuts also have high nutritional value, but contain a significant amount of fat. After years of research, and speaking with nutritionists, I've come to realize that any one thing, eaten in excess is bad for the body. Fats are a required food, but in moderation. They are very high in caloric content, as are processed starches such as white flour and cornstarch. Potatoes are high in starches and will also spike the blood sugar.

The body is a complex machine that requires a whole bunch of different nutrients. Grains supply most of them. Fruits, especially those that grow outside the tropical regions are very healthy to consume. Grapes and oranges, even grapefruit, mangoes, papay, bananas, etc., have nutritional value but are very high in natural sugars. These must be eaten sparingly.

Sweet potatoes are listed as one of the "super" foods, as are blueberries, cranberries, raspberries, etc.

The phrase; all things in moderation, is a natural law of nature. Of equal importance is eating a wide range of foods, as each contributes in ways that are specific to them.

It really doesn't hurt to enjoy something like a piece of flour-coated fried chicken once in a while. Just don't make it a habit. If you want great tasting chicken that doesn't use flour, try marinating in a spicy sauce, then grilling, broiling, or baking it.

Good luck in your search for the perfect technique. I hope you find it. If you want, I have a recipe that uses no flour, or staches of any kind, and no eggs as all. And the spicy heat is just right. But your will need to either bake this chicken, or cook it on over charcoal.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
thanks! you are absolutely right about having everything in moderation. me and my husband experimenting and learning.

i am actually not on high protein diet, i do use starch for baking only.

in addition to the above, i like fat in moderation like we add few drop of extra virgin olive oil to freshly squeezed juice. we add olive oil to salads, my family like to have buttermilk for snack, just stuff we don't per say count calories but i would love to loose some extra baby weight.

we bake meat, meatloaf, basically don't use salt, i do make healthy meal have to feed my husband NYC fireman who is in great physical shape he runs marathons and works out regularly, i am in decent shape and then need to take care of babies so we include all foods in our diet from fruitss/vegies/soups,meat/chicken etc.

sometimes do like to bake deserts that's how i found out about corn starch that was required.
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Old 05-09-2011, 04:50 PM   #18
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It sounds like you and your husband are doing things right. My eldest son is a fireman in Tacoma/Seattle area of Washington. He too runs and is in great physical shape, as is his wife, who is about to give him their 2nd child, this one a boy.

I'm always happy to hear about people who are trying to live life the right way, making family decisions to make the family healthy both physically, and mentally, spiritually as well.

I have certainly made dietary mistakes early in life from nutritional ignorance. I try to share what I've learned to help others avoid those mistakes.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 05-09-2011, 04:54 PM   #19
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It sounds like you and your husband are doing things right. My eldest son is a fireman in Tacoma/Seattle area of Washington. He too runs and is in great physical shape, as is his wife, who is about to give him their 2nd child, this one a boy.

I'm always happy to hear about people who are trying to live life the right way, making family decisions to make the family healthy both physically, and mentally, spiritually as well.

I have certainly made dietary mistakes early in life from nutritional ignorance. I try to share what I've learned to help others avoid those mistakes.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
thanks! that's really good to share/learn new info.
i am getting sweet potatoes for my kids next time i am going shopping, haven't bought those in a while.

fireman besides being brave (applause) they are very picky eaters, my husband tells me each nite they go to the supermarket with their team and pick out ingridients for their meals. some of the senior guys are professional level cooks and they make certain dishes that cook for hours which in real regular home life most people won't do.
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Old 05-09-2011, 05:18 PM   #20
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thanks! that's really good to share/learn new info.
i am getting sweet potatoes for my kids next time i am going shopping, haven't bought those in a while.

fireman besides being brave (applause) they are very picky eaters, my husband tells me each nite they go to the supermarket with their team and pick out ingridients for their meals. some of the senior guys are professional level cooks and they make certain dishes that cook for hours which in real regular home life most people won't do.
My son will eat most anything. I am a bit of a gourmet cook, and very adventurous. He'd had escargot and squid, and most anything I could find to make before he was 7 years old, including peppers of all kinds.

None of my family are picky eaters. They couldn't be because I had them try anything and everything from the time they were alowed to start solid foods. I hope his children are the same way. I know my youngest daughter's kids will be. She is a very adventurous cook and loves most everything. She is like me in that she wants to try every technique and flavor she can find. It makes for interesting and healthy meals.

I always lived by the rule that if I've never had it, then I better give it a try, to see if I like it. And except for minty things, I like almost everything I've tasted. That also gives me and my family options. We can go anywhere and enjoy the local cuisine. It's a good thing.

Sweet potatoes - they are considered a super food from their nutritional value. You can cook them so many ways. If you find that your crew isn't crazy about them, then mash them up, add some ginger, cloves, and cinnamon, a touch of molasses, and the sweetener of your choice. They they will then taste like pumpkin pie filling. They also go well with oranges, and with salt and pepper. Y can fry them, steam them, bake them, grill them, boil and mash them, mix them into quick bread recipes, pies, or just eat them with a bit of butter, right out of the skin.

Can you tell that I really like sweet potatoes? And the darker orange they are, the better I like them.

And don't even get me started on rutabagas, or celery root. Yum. Have you ever had a pasty? We have great big discussion threads about those little beauties.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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