"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-30-2011, 11:26 AM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 3
yes it is
__________________

__________________
ruffus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 11:38 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
The acidity of tomatoes and aluminum can be an undesirable combination.
__________________

__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 01:26 PM   #13
Cook
 
AmandaN80's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Midwest, USA
Posts: 94
I wouldnt use a PC for sauce. When I make mine, I start it the night before I want to have it done and cook low all night and til dinner time :) Usually its kind of thick and more so if I add any meats at the end.
__________________
AmandaN80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 02:07 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Kent, CT/Dover Plains, NY
Posts: 30
I think Simple is Best!

While I have enjoyed many long, slow, simmered spaghetti sauces over the years, I find that simple sauces made in 45 minute or less are still my favorite. Marcella Hazan's recipe with 5T butter, 28 oz San Marzano Tomatoes, broken up by hand, and an onion cut in half through the root end to keep both halves intact, simmered for about 40-45 minutes, then seasoned, is hard to beat. Also simple EVOO, minced garlic, salt, pepper, 28 oz San Marzano Tomatoes simmed about 40-45 minutes, adding lots of fresh basil chiffonade at the end, is also hard to beat!
__________________
ranleemil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 02:19 PM   #15
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Fresh whole tomatoes and sauces with chicken, pork, sausages, and meatballs can take longer.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 03:24 PM   #16
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Kent, CT/Dover Plains, NY
Posts: 30
I Agree!

Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Fresh whole tomatoes and sauces with chicken, pork, sausages, and meatballs can take longer.
I agree, and as I said, I have had some wonderful sauces that have even taken days to prepare. A real Bolognese is the perfect example, but my own personal preference is to be more traditional and have a pasta course and a meat course later in the meal. I once took a cooking class with Arthur Schwartz and he taught me to make the best Neapolitan meatballs with raisins and pine nuts. That is one of my preferred meat courses!
__________________
ranleemil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 04:24 PM   #17
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranleemil View Post
I agree, and as I said, I have had some wonderful sauces that have even taken days to prepare. A real Bolognese is the perfect example, but my own personal preference is to be more traditional and have a pasta course and a meat course later in the meal. I once took a cooking class with Arthur Schwartz and he taught me to make the best Neapolitan meatballs with raisins and pine nuts. That is one of my preferred meat courses!
Schwartz is pretty good. I use one of his recipes to make a nice chocolate and chestnut desert. Many Americans are not familiar with the primo e segundo piatti concept.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2011, 01:41 AM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1
Oh, yes... you can make pasta sauce in the pressure cooker!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ruffus View Post
I would like to know if someone has tips on how to avoid burning spaghetti sauce in a pressure cooker? Thanks
I can't believe some of the responses you got! You can absolutely make sauce in the pressure cooker - from fancy to easy.

Sausage is a good starter, but plain tomato and any classic Italian pasta sauce can be done under pressure.

20 minutes is entirely too long to cook a pasta sauce under pressure (unless you are doing the classic bolognese) and could explain the scorching problems some people are talking about.

The most important points are:

1. Use chopped or whole tomatoes so that the pan can reach pressure quickly.
2. Do not overcook the sauce.
3. If your pressure cooker is larger than 6L, add a couple extra tablespoons of water (your pressure cooker needs it).
4. Cook pasta one minute less than you usually would - pressure cooked pasta sauce can be pretty hot and it will keep cooking the pasta once you stir them together.

You can also cook the pasta directly in the sauce - but I'm still working on perfecting the "secret formula" for the right pasta shape, and quantity of liquid so that the results can be predictably al-dente!

happy pressure cooking, and let us know about your results!

Ciao,

Laura
hip pressure cooking
__________________
hipcook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2011, 07:38 AM   #19
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 3
Thank you for your answers to my question, yesterday I cooked my spaghetti sauce in a pressure cooker, it was excellent!!! but you have to control the heat if you do not want to burn it. I added a little bit more beef stock. If anybody had good recipes for pressure cookers could you please post them. Thanks again
__________________

__________________
ruffus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
in

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.