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Old 05-27-2007, 04:28 PM   #11
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Beautiful, legend. I think it could use a little more soil. Add as much extra in as you can. You might have to resort to using a large spoon to get it into the "balconies," but it can be done.

Make sure you keep them watered and you feed them some Miracle Grow once a week. To make sure the herbs "bush" out, don't forget to pinch them back.
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Old 05-27-2007, 08:03 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legend_018
ok, I've never done this before. The garden center gave me a run down. I posted some pictures of what I made. Does anything look abnormal? Does it look normal? There is oregano, thyme, basil, rosemary, and parsley that I planted into the pot. I keep in thinking I should squish more dirt in there?

Are they suppose to hang down like that? It's the best I could do.
Looks good I would put some more soil in the top - the crown, where the root meets the stem, of the plants should be almost even with the top of the opening.

They will pop up as they become accustomed to their new home.

When you see flower buds, pinch them off; otherwise, the plants will put their energy into making flowers rather than the leaves you want. And when you harvest, never take more than one third of the leaves.
Good luck with your new garden
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Old 05-28-2007, 11:27 AM   #13
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looks nice, legend.... just not sure how long it will last you because all those herbs needs more space for the roots. especially oregano it can grow to a pretty big sized bush. good luck anyway!
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Old 05-28-2007, 11:38 AM   #14
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I thougth that it was a doable solution? The lady at the garden center did say in the ground was bettter. Hmmmm. She also said the basil and some might die when I bring it in for the winter. But she said it was doable and people do it this way.
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Old 05-28-2007, 11:47 AM   #15
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It can be done, legend. I've done it. And, yes, some of the plants don't fare as well as others when brought inside for the winter.

When you bring them inside, you should find a nice sunny place to put the pot and make sure you keep the soil moist. The climate in our homes is usually somewhat less humid than outside, so you have to watch the moisture level of the soil. You might also mist the leaves from time to time to make sure they're hydrated, too.

One thing's sure, if you don't try it, nothing is going to happen.
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Old 05-28-2007, 02:45 PM   #16
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I'm a big-time herb person (In fact, I had my own herbal landscaping business back in NY).

While your pots as you have them should do fine, here are a couple of tips.

Woody-stemmed herbs like sage, thyme, oregano, rosemary like dryer conditions than fleshy-stemmed herbs like basil, parsley, & chives, so it's best to plant these different groups together so you can water accordingly.

Also, except for miniature varieties (which I don't think you have there), basil can easily reach 3' high, so is best off in it's own big clay pot. But if you keep yours pinched back with use, yours should be okay. You could, if you wanted to, take out one or two of the basil plants & give them their own large pot. Then you'd definitely have enough basil for a summer's worth of cooking & pesto. Yum!!
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Old 05-28-2007, 07:03 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
But if you keep yours pinched back with use, yours should be okay.
Does pinched back mean cut them every once in awhile? LIke cut them taking the basil off?
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Old 05-28-2007, 07:19 PM   #18
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Legend, what pinching back means is, is you cut or pinch the top-most growing part of a plant or its shoots. Basil, for example, will grow tall and leggy and even bloom if it isn't pinched back. The object is to encourage side growth and fullness by limiting the height.

Here's a link that might help. Also click on the "herbs" link in the article for information on a wide variety of herbs. I think you'll find it interesting.
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Old 05-28-2007, 07:22 PM   #19
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Exactly. Pinch or snip/cut the tops of the plants for cooking use. More leafy branches will sprout, & it will help to keep the plant in bounds.
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:13 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic
Most commonly used herbs originated in the Mediterranean, so they needs lots of full sun - they generally don't do very well inside, unless you can give them lots of sun.

My herb garden is about 15 years old now (this is a picture from last year):



I have Italian, Mexican, and purple ruffled basil; flat-leaf parsley; French and lemon thyme; sage; tarragon; lemon verbena; Greek and Mexican oregano; and rosemary. We're also growing fennel and garlic in the herb garden, and I have spearmint in a clay strawberry pot; mint is invasive, at least where I live, so it needs to be contained

Also, to preserve fresh herbs, another option is to whir them in a blender with some water, then freeze them in ice cube trays. With basil or oregano, for example, you can then throw a cube or two into some sauce to get that fresh herb flavor.
This is beautiful! I would love to have this! Here is a dumb question, are these herbs perenials? Can I plant them and have them come back year after year? Thanks for sharing this picture! What a great job!
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